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Messages - ynotbrusum

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286
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: shocking my system
« on: November 11, 2014, 12:45:54 PM »
With the advent of the better bottle, I use stuff that doesn't hurt that plastic:

http://www.better-bottle.com/technical.html?=b-b_cleaning_right.html

For stainless and counter flow chiller I CIP using PBW at the rates on the jug.

287
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: BJCP Tasting Exam
« on: November 09, 2014, 05:29:14 AM »
I hope it went well.  I start a primer class in December for a spring taste exam, so I will be reading up on scoring and practicing with score sheets this winter.

288
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Overly carbonated and overly bitter
« on: November 07, 2014, 06:10:34 AM »
There is typically enough yeast remaining to carbonate, even after cold crashing, unless you lagered it for an extremely long time, for what it is worth.  As long as the beers are not gushing, you can open each and re-cap at this point, but if it is too dry or solventy hot, that won't correct by doing so.

Did you ferment a bit too warm maybe?

289
Ingredients / Re: Big Alcohol, Little Knowledge
« on: November 06, 2014, 10:01:02 PM »
Realistically, making your own wort gives you more fermentable wort, based on my experience.  How far can you pitch it?   I don't know that....

290
Ingredients / Re: Second Use for Dry Hops
« on: November 06, 2014, 09:42:26 PM »
no - don't reuse them.  A neighbor tried and the result was BAD!   Trust me on this!  And they are carcinogenic to some pets!

291
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Overly carbonated and overly bitter
« on: November 06, 2014, 09:35:36 PM »
Yes, you can de carbonate as you seek to do, but should you?  That is a much harder question.  Why did it overcarbonate in the first place?  If an infection, then you probably have issues that are not so easily resolved.  If simply bottled before fermentation was complete, then maybe you will be okay with that process.  I rarely rack before finally hitting terminal gravity - but you don't know based on what was submitted here.  If you know based on a fast ferment test, then you can answer your question by checking FG.

If it is merely over carbonation - you should be able to pour and allow the beer to settle.

292
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« on: November 06, 2014, 09:23:32 PM »
I have almost no sensitivity to diacetyl but I am crazy sensitive to clove and similar spiciness.  I have 20 gallons of German lager made for a Christmas party that I will do a D rest on this weekend just for safety sake, but I won't be able to tell if it gets rid of it or just reduces it.  I was at a club meeting at a regional brewpub and an accomplished judge told me to try a beer to be able to taste what diacetyl is and I told him that I perceived a little slickness on the tongue, but no discernible taste issue.  He said I have much to learn, so I am signed up for his BJCP tasting class this winter.  Call me palate deprived, but willing to learn.

A high % of the population is blind to diacetyl. That is due to genetics and you can't learn to taste diaceyl if you can't, it is like being color blind to some colors. My sensitivity is medium high to high. I have to use the slickness test for levels sensitive people call out Diacetyl! Sam Smiths beers, I get it. Ringwood breweries, I usually get it.



I heard of a few guys that either get it on the end of their nose, or as slickness or as a soapiness.  Hopefully I will fall in there somewhere as I had a lager recently that a couple guys said was not great and as it was a step up lager, to just get enough yeast to do a full batch to pitch into, I wasn't too worried, but I suspected diacetyl issues.  Nobody could give me a good descriptor for the flaw, so I don't know what the issue was for sure,but I suspect diacetyl. I tried my best to tell what they tasted, but at this point I guess I must admit my blind spot...

293
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast cell counts
« on: November 06, 2014, 08:21:44 PM »
34/70 pitches fine in 5 gallons of sub 1.050 wort at lager temps, but I rehydrate :P

294
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 100% Brett First Attempt
« on: November 06, 2014, 08:13:47 PM »
I haven't done it, but expect good results.  I have done the Trois after a neutral sacc addition and with time, it works great.  I want to see how it goes straight up.  One guy I know did an all brett kolsch - and it was surprisingly good!  Not truly a kolsch, but it let the brett shine through really well.

295
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How come my lagrs are cloudy?
« on: November 06, 2014, 08:04:25 PM »
I've had beers that didn't clear at 8 weeks, but then were Crystal clear at 12...sometimes that yeast hangs in suspension for crazy long with lagers.  Others cold crash clear in 6 weeks grain to glass.  Sometimes the same strain but different generation, too.

296
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« on: November 06, 2014, 07:57:03 PM »
I have almost no sensitivity to diacetyl but I am crazy sensitive to clove and similar spiciness.  I have 20 gallons of German lager made for a Christmas party that I will do a D rest on this weekend just for safety sake, but I won't be able to tell if it gets rid of it or just reduces it.  I was at a club meeting at a regional brewpub and an accomplished judge told me to try a beer to be able to taste what diacetyl is and I told him that I perceived a little slickness on the tongue, but no discernible taste issue.  He said I have much to learn, so I am signed up for his BJCP tasting class this winter.  Call me palate deprived, but willing to learn.

297
Older than most, I had homebrew given to me in 1982 and said then that I wanted to try making it, but over the next 2 decades, I only rarely had homebrews and life got busy...fast forward to 2003-2004 when a neighbor was brewing and both of us were Boy Scout leaders with our same age sons.  I loved his homebrew and said I wanted to brew with him...it just so happens that an older Scout had an Eagle project at a women's shelter located down the street from our LHBS.  We completed the project and I ambled down the street to check out the "basic package".  Other leaders said "you'll never make your money back at that".  I bought the package and my first Pale Ale kit anyway.  Those other guys are now begging for my beer at parties.  Nuff Said.  We now have 6-7 regular Brewers in my neighborhood alone.  While I may not have made my money back, I have no regrets and typically tell people that I wasted most of my first 45 years not brewing.  But I am making up for lost time - which reminds me...at 200 gallons per year, shouldn't I consider those early years as a period of banking gallons for the current production period?  I got plenty of cushion under that arrangement!!! 

Cheers to the best hobby known to man.

298
I get staple hops in bulk, but I buy specialty hops at the LHBS, together with sacks of grain.  Nothing but help when I ask and because I buy regularly, I get special discounted deals on things that they have - such as yeast that is not yet expired, but getting legs...which I gladly use for a starter without issue or first shot at something new that is coming out.  I prefer to keep the LHBS in business, but I'm not going to pay excessively for the basic stuff.  So for me it's convenience (service?), with price lagging a bit behind that.

299
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Drill through Freezer / Fridge
« on: November 03, 2014, 07:28:06 PM »
I joined the freezer door and the fridge door together with a small plate at the side of each door on the side that opens.  That way no inadvertent trips of the tap handles.  When I open the door, I open the top and bottom as one unit.  It doesn't cause me any headaches. And it was easy/peasy.

300
On order this morning - now just waiting on delivery!

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