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Messages - ynotbrusum

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376
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Carbonation Cap
« on: October 22, 2015, 03:45:48 AM »
I broke down on a whim and bought four stainless versions.  They really are handy.  Now I siphon right to the end and take the last bit into PET bottles and carb this way.  Sometimes I get some trub because I get a bit aggressive with the siphoning, but just carb the bottle and let the gunk settle out and pour carefully - when its almost a half gallon, l figure what the heck, a few freebies!

377
Thought that you yeast guys might dig this:

https://flic.kr/p/zMeGfY

Hope it posts correctly....

378
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 21, 2015, 06:42:23 AM »
Had to get back to commenting on this next one from Jeff:

 It is a blended sour  and here are my impressions:

 A wonderful Sweetish-sour aroma at the cap removal,  poured into a dark, ruby-garnet-noted, deep mahogany color; The next whiff overwhelms the nose with bursts of deep fig and raisin, as the head dissipates to a light brown tight bead fading to the edge of the glass.

First sip brings a strong, bright sour note with the lightest of funky Brett-like overtones; lactic bite lingers with a touch of  creaminess in the corner of the mouth as an aftertaste. Very late palate leaves a mouth coating of tartness – and the slightest hint of oxidation (but not unexpectedly nor out of place).

 This is a complex, dark sour that is labeled as blended – indeed the level of complexity in the aroma and flavor bear witness that it could not be matched by a single batch sour ale.

Another well done example from the Tampa braumeister.  I clearly got the best end of this deal.....
Thanks.  I'm glad you liked it.  I had entered the two beers separately in a sours competition and they both scored in the lower 20's so I wasn't very confident in it.  The majority of the blend, about 75%, is from a solara project that's been aging for about 5 years.  The other part is from a Brett C batch, also very old, but it was showing a bit too much acetic, vinegar flavor for me and was extremely sour.  I kind of liked the way the blend turned out.  I may mix up some more and carb it up.

My taste for sours runs on the lower pH range - too sour for some,but it is all about the overall impression with these beers in my opinion.  I enjoyed it - you might find my sours to be a bit overwhelming (my Berliner is 2.9 pH - great with a raspberry syrup, though!)

379
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Does YOUR Lager Smell Before Lagering?
« on: October 21, 2015, 03:34:42 AM »
I just racked a Pilsner last night that could be drank today, if it were carbed.  Brewed it on 9-28.  Just did Marshall's temp schedule and the hydrometer sample was super - no green flavor, smell, or aftertaste, and clear as a bell with no finings, so it was perhaps the yeast (34/70), or the ferment temp schedule. BTW, it was a 45 minute mash, 45 minute boil with mostly Pilsner based malt.  Carbing as I write this and I expect to sample it before the weekend.

380
All Grain Brewing / Re: Distilled Water, salt additions and PH
« on: October 21, 2015, 02:58:01 AM »
With Brunwater in my computer, I don't feel the need to use some shotgun gimmick, either.

381
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 20, 2015, 06:22:26 PM »
Had to get back to commenting on this next one from Jeff:

 It is a blended sour  and here are my impressions:

 A wonderful Sweetish-sour aroma at the cap removal,  poured into a dark, ruby-garnet-noted, deep mahogany color; The next whiff overwhelms the nose with bursts of deep fig and raisin, as the head dissipates to a light brown tight bead fading to the edge of the glass.

First sip brings a strong, bright sour note with the lightest of funky Brett-like overtones; lactic bite lingers with a touch of  creaminess in the corner of the mouth as an aftertaste. Very late palate leaves a mouth coating of tartness – and the slightest hint of oxidation (but not unexpectedly nor out of place).

 This is a complex, dark sour that is labeled as blended – indeed the level of complexity in the aroma and flavor bear witness that it could not be matched by a single batch sour ale.

Another well done example from the Tampa braumeister.  I clearly got the best end of this deal.....

382
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 20, 2015, 11:12:55 AM »
Nice.
I am enjoying another commercial beer from Ynotbrusum.  This one is Satin Solitude, an Imperial Stout from Central Waters, Wisconsin.  Mmmmmm.  Thanks, Jerry.

Glad you like it Jeff.  I will be getting back to your beers, possibly starting tonight.  Can you believe I have been too busy to have many beers the last week or so?  I'm not talking about brewing, just drinking.  Nothing scheduled tonight after work, except for taking out the trash, so I just might enjoy a couple three of yours!

383
What I try to do is make a good solution of cleaner - PBW powder or Craftmeister tabs and give it a good soak or scrubbing.  Then I rinse well with hot tap water and sanitize with Star San (since I have a large jug of it to use up) or Iodophor at the lighter concentration.  I figure that if I do that and then use the vessel immediately, I am pretty safe from mold and wild yeast contamination.  If I store the cleaned and sanitized vessel for any length of time, then I sanitize again with Iodophor.

When I use up my present stash of Star San and Iodophor, I will be moving to the bleach and vinegar process, but that will probably be a long time down the road, given the bulk buys I made a while back!

384
All Grain Brewing / Re: Distilled Water, salt additions and PH
« on: October 18, 2015, 08:46:03 AM »
I also brew with distilled water which makes things pretty easy if you have a decent gram scale.  I've only been using gypsum, calcium chloride and 10% phosphoric acid.
That's all you really need. I do like a small amount of NaCl in my maltier beers, though.

Here's all you need (Sounds like 5.2 with options...):

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/brewing/brewing-ingredients/salts-finings/accumash

Anybody try this one yet?

385
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: and one day it happens...
« on: October 16, 2015, 07:10:39 PM »
I have been trying to nail down a few different brews. Saison, bitter, and braggot. With the saison, I brewed one which hit all the spots for me. Earthy, spicey, some fruit, and a nice noble hop aroma.,as well as low gravity. I used four different yeasts in no measured proportions, and have not been able to duplicate.

Bitter- still searching. Looking for that Burton snatch, and nice big EKG aroma, or Fuggles. Just haven't found the balence I am looking for without making it an esb.

 Braggot - not even sure quite what I am looking for. But I brew them a lot, and have a different concept for each one that is just not quite met.

4 different yeasts will be hard to replicate. Bitter is a great one to seek excellence on - recipe, mash temp and hop rate can make it elusive...I love to try to replicate Marston's Pedigree (I've gotten close, but it's just not the same as cask-served with a beer engine and sparkler).  Braggot is an area in which I have yet to delve - but you may just find what you like even without being certain what you are looking for!

386
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Hop You Hate
« on: October 16, 2015, 07:02:56 PM »
The hop I hate is whatever is in any overhopped beer...I like balance and understand that other folks like carpet bombed palate crushers, which is what makes this hobby and the human sense of smell and taste so subjective.

387
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: and one day it happens...
« on: October 16, 2015, 06:20:46 PM »
I love this success story.  If you are critical enough, you reach the point where the beers you make are good enough to be really satisfactory (and so much better than the average commercial example), but every so often they are exactly what you hoped for.  That is an "AHA" moment for sure.  I entered one such beer that got a 45 from a commercial lager brewer - it didn't even medal, but I knew what he was digging and I was digging it, too.

388
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 2000 Lag
« on: October 15, 2015, 04:19:28 AM »
I know an award winning lager Brewer in my club that does the same thing.  I just fear ester formation at warm temps.  Now I tend to pitch at fermentation temperature or just a couple degrees above it as it is dropping.  Old habits are just that....thanks for the input.

389
All Grain Brewing / Re: Distilled Water, salt additions and PH
« on: October 14, 2015, 07:30:19 PM »
At what point does the Epsom additions become a laxative?  I used it only a few times and then very little of it out of fear that the Mg would become detectable and minerally at that point.

390
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Infection IN the serving keg??
« on: October 14, 2015, 07:18:42 PM »
Please keep in mind that Star San does not kill Brett (Star San does not kill yeast or mold).   Star San only kills bacteria.

Yes, I have experienced both a Brett infection (though the "infected" beer was quite good as a clean sour) and a mold on lighter beers that were held at room temp for an extended period after reaching terminal gravity.  One time it was a residual effect from a Star San (Brett) and the other was from a dry airlock (aargh).  That's the problem you face with reliance on Star San, if you have sours going in your brewery, and running short of kegs and forgetting to watch the airlocks.

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