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Messages - ynotbrusum

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391
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Leaving Dry Hops/Fruit in a keg?
« on: August 28, 2014, 10:58:49 AM »
Found the sure screen as a brand name - and I have one, so I'll be sure to use it when racking this batch.

392
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Leaving Dry Hops/Fruit in a keg?
« on: August 28, 2014, 10:42:06 AM »
One of the fruit wine makers in my group said that some particulate is likely to be racked over, even using a sanitized mesh bag as a screen.  So I am going to see how clear my Blackberry Brett Saison racks this weekend.  If necessary, will Biofine drop this stuff out in the keg?  I could do that with a cold crash and re-rack to get it clearer....just thinking out loud.what is a sure screen?

393
Good to know, Keith.  I guess I have been acting on the conservative side for cooling ales (i.e., longer), but so far by pitching well, the yeasts have fermented pretty well and reached full attenuation, despite the extended cooling.  Good to know that after 3 days or so, I can rest easier on these ale measures and let the rise occur a little (I am not talking a total free rise to hot temperatures, of course - except for those Saisons).

394
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Choosing a house yeast
« on: August 28, 2014, 10:26:43 AM »
I thought that Wyeast 1768 was a reserve collection strain, but it is not:

http://www.wyeastlab.com/he_s_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=20

I have not tried the Roquefort strain, but could be convinced if others think highly of it! I can compare it to the new Abbaye Ale dry yeast that I have going in primary on a Belgian Golden Strong presently...
I'd stay away from the Roquefort strain, as well as the Stilton, Munster and Camembert strains.  ;)

Now Rochefort, that is second only to the Unibroue strain (WY3864 - sadly only a seasonal strain) for my favorite Belgian yeast.

Damn autocorrect!  I clearly meant to say smoked Gouda!

Thanks for the distinction, Denny.  It's good to get a concise assessment on some of these strains.  Maybe I'll do a split batch when space allows.

395
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« on: August 28, 2014, 09:51:16 AM »
I've rarely used a fermenter where I can see the krausen, to know when it has fallen.  Do you know about how long it takes this strain to reach that point at those cooler temperatures?  60 for Jim and 55-56 for Fermented-minds? I would be glad to hear your experiences, as I am pretty convinced that I will be keeping a 60-70 Schilling Scottish Ale on my regular tap rotation this fall and through the foreseeable future.

396
How far along into fermentation do you typically not worry about temperature causing fusels and excessive esters?  I have been keeping my ales cool for the first five to ten days in a chilling bag with frozen water bottle rotation, but then letting them finish at interior room temperature (72-75F in the summer) for the last little bit.  Just wondering if there is an accepted degree of attenuation where the ales can be left alone without much worry?

397
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Choosing a house yeast
« on: August 28, 2014, 09:32:35 AM »
I thought that Wyeast 1768 was a reserve collection strain, but it is not:

http://www.wyeastlab.com/he_s_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=20

I have not tried the Roquefort strain, but could be convinced if others think highly of it! I can compare it to the new Abbaye Ale dry yeast that I have going in primary on a Belgian Golden Strong presently...

398
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Choosing a house yeast
« on: August 27, 2014, 11:08:18 AM »
For my English bitters, Milds, etc...I try to keep some 1768 on hand to propagate - I like it and have even used it on a 60 Schilling Scottish Ale that was mashed pretty high and it finished off below 1.010, surprisingly.  That and 1450 for the American Ales pretty much could work for most of the lighter styles I brew.  For a bigger yeast for across the board - you could consider Wyeast 1332 Northwest Ale yeast.  I tried it on an American light rye ale and it was superb.

399
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« on: August 26, 2014, 03:47:58 PM »
In the low 60's to start (using a bag chiller and frozen 2 liter water bottles) then rose up to high 60's to 70 or so to finish off after about five days.  Still in primary, but expecting to rack soon.

400


Also remember that the ABC does not make regulations, only the legislation can do that, they only enforce existing regulations. 
That is incorrect. Legislatures pass laws and agencies promulgate regulations. The power to promulgate regulations is granted by law and can be quite broad.


Moreover, in some states local jurisdictions can make more stringent rules than the state, so you can get "dry pockets" where little or no alcohol can be sold. And by extension, they could adopt further limits on homebrewing.

401
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I want to brew bigger batches
« on: August 25, 2014, 08:39:27 AM »
I've decided that I don't need bigger batches, I need another temp controlled fermentation freezer. I like brewing and I like variety. I'd rather run four 5 gallon batches than one 20 gallon.

I hear you, Jim.  I brew 10 gallon lagers for the crowd and 5 gallon batches for myself and samplers who can venture off the path.  I went to two dedicated freezers (1 for fermenting and 1 for lagering) and run my ales in a separate brew chiller bag, rotating ice bottles, in the late spring/summer/early fall and in my garage on heater wraps in the late fall/winter/early spring.  Variety is what I have come to look forward to - but consistency on the standard offerings that my friends prefer.

402
A few years back Wisconsin cracked down at homebrews served at beerfests.  They changed the law but the homebrew is still segregated from the commercial serving area as a "homebrew island".  Illinois did a similar measure in 2013, I believe, but most beer feasts in IL don't serve homebrew, because of the licensing required here.  But they can at least now hold competitions legally, as long as the judges are affiliated with BJCP or similar organization:

http://beerpulse.com/2013/07/illinois-governor-signs-homebrew-bill-allowing-competition-entry-sharing-and-more-772/

Crazy rules but like Drew said - we have to comply or risk being considered the same as outlaw moonshiners....

403
Ingredients / Re: 6-row Maltsters Differences/Preferences
« on: August 23, 2014, 07:01:58 AM »
Both Rahr and Briess also have 6 row, but I only used it once in an American Pre-pro lager and really could not tell any difference.  I also can't recall if it was an American barley or not.  I was told that the 6 row has higher diastatic enzyme action, so it can help convert more adjuncts and has a bit mor of some type of saccharides, but I don't recall the specifics at the moment.  So, give any brand a try on a known recipe and see if you notice the difference from 2 row.  I would like to hear your thoughts.


404
Not this weekend but on my next brew day I'm going all experimental.  NW Sour, specifically a Klickitat Sour. 50/50 german pils and munich 10L, 1lb oats. 1.050ish. 2 oz of Willamette at 5 minutes, no bitter charge. Lacto for 7 days at 80º then NW Ale 1332 at 68º till done (wherever that is). If the hydrometer is lacking that certain Jenny Sayqua I'll secondary on 10lbs peaches.

I like your enthusiasm, Jim - you are all in!  Sounds like the sour bug has bit ya!  Got me about a year and a half ago based on this forum...then I met Michael Tonsmeire at NHC in June and it solidified my passion for this unique hobby and sub hobby!  Go for it! (was that too many exclamation points for a sour beer approval?)

Good on ya, regardless

405
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: And So the Solera Begins
« on: August 22, 2014, 07:57:28 PM »
Jonathon and Major -  I would be glad to be in on that exchange - plus in addition to my Flanders Solera, I have a Blackberry Brett Saison that is almost ready for racking off the fruit, if that might be of interest...it would be worth it for me just to get your honest feedback, as I am (relatively) new to the sour/funk side of the hobby.  Each year I want to do around 15-25 gallons of sour to be able to blend and age....maybe the forum will eventually generate enough interest to have a special section for sours?

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