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Messages - ynotbrusum

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46
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Quick turn around on Bavarian Weis
« on: October 13, 2016, 02:30:32 PM »
If you are thinking of keeping it on the light side, a British ale such as a bitter, golden ale or similar would likely be ready in time and be an easy drinker, too.  The golden ale would benefit from a short crash or gelatin.  Really, a whole bunch of lighter ales could fit this fermentation schedule profile.

Cheers and Good luck!

47
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: pour in four
« on: October 13, 2016, 02:26:24 PM »
I have pulled off 11 and 12 days.  Booze is done in 3-5 carbonation in the next 4-5 days and that is really pushing it

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk



I envision someone coming up with a  bottle cap that has a seal that releases above 12 psi, but then reseals as it resets at 12 psi.  A spunding valve for a bottle?

48
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 25
« on: October 13, 2016, 02:23:08 PM »
I knew Denny's position vis a vis LODO going in, so it didn't land so harshly on my ears.  Like I noted above, I am doing some things to minimize uptake of oxygen and seeing pretty good results.  I view both of the other steps (Brewtan B and GBF suggestions) as merely this - (i) additives that assist chemically to guard against oxidation or otherwise create potentially better tasting beer by binding with compounds and chemicals to minimize or eliminate occasional problems and (ii) processes which attempt to assist in guarding against oxidation and otherwise improve beer quality or stability. 

As I see it, there is room at the table for all of this and I think Joe was saying that Brewtan B can help with a number of different things, regardless of what else you use or process you take to make your beer the best that you feel you want it to be (though some things may counteract the effect of others). 

Some additives or processes are within one person's horizon and beyond that same horizon for another brewer, who is content with his beer and feels that the additional marginal effort (be it process or additive) is beyond his needs or beyond what he wishes to undertake in this hobby without further proof of the extent of improvement to be obtained by the effort.

49
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 25
« on: October 13, 2016, 11:19:56 AM »
I streamed it last night - enjoyed it, as usual.  I also do Drew's approach of sanitizer with CO2 purging and that seems to have reduced oxidation noticeably.  I heard about it at NHC this summer and now include it in my regular routine along with kegging direct from fermenter (those fermenters with valves) to keg (in the out tube via QCD with prv cracked to allow flow, to further eliminate O2 contact.  Maybe I'm imagining, but it seems to retain freshness better....

50
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 25
« on: October 12, 2016, 06:36:55 PM »
Probably should weigh out a 1/4 tsp and go by weight/volume of water.  Maybe do a few samples to average the weight, if 1/4 tsp is difficult to measure out...

51
Tx all of you, i did my transfert to a secondary and it look fine.

Now try to just primary ferment - the extra racking exposes the beer to more chance of oxidation and spoliation than just leaving it on the yeast cake for a few extra days.  Then check gravity a few days in a row and when it doesn't budge even a bit, it is done and can be racked to the bottling bucket or keg.

Cheers and enjoy your brew!

52
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: whirlpooling a krausen starter?
« on: October 12, 2016, 05:13:38 AM »
Sounds like some extra work, but maybe worth the effort.  I may have to try it when I am low on lagering chest space.

53
Note that I was not saying it was great, just that if the poster liked it, then great.  To each his own, but as an ale attempting to be like a Maibock, it is often cited.  I haven't had a Rogue beer in a long time, so I couldn't compare it from memory.

IMO, it's not even a good version of an ale pretending to be a maibock.  Now, if you like the beer, that's great...but like it what it is, not what it's not.

I agree with that, for sure.  Just like some beers just don't fit a recognized style, but are enjoyed by some beer drinkers regardless.  I make a cross between a mild and a bitter that I don't enter in contests, but I and many others really enjoy.  It just doesn't fit either style....

54
Note that I was not saying it was great, just that if the poster liked it, then great.  To each his own, but as an ale attempting to be like a Maibock, it is often cited.  I haven't had a Rogue beer in a long time, so I couldn't compare it from memory.

55
If you like Dead Guy Ale, that is great - it approaches the style from an ale perspective, of course.  As to stylistic comparisons for it, the Maibocks from Capital Brewing out of Middleton Wisconsin, Smuttynose and Summit and Schell's Maifest are lagers that pretty well exemplify the style.  You might find one of them out there in a craft beer store or seller.  They tend to hold up reasonably well at least until the early fall - or so has been my experience.  Smuttynose Maibock is the biggest abv of those named.

56
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: macro homebrew trends
« on: October 10, 2016, 11:25:03 AM »
Kettle souring has raised the sour trend, I believe, but I wonder if it will continue.  Mixed fermentation styles are trending up, as well, with a Brett finish and secondary additive, such as fruit.

57
All Grain Brewing / Re: Castle vs Dingemans Pils malt
« on: October 06, 2016, 02:39:38 PM »
We Belgian homebrewers don't really care too much which of the two.
Oh and it's Dingemans, genitive Dingemans', and not:
Dingaemans
Dingemanns
Dingemann's
Dingemann
Dingeman's
Dingeman

I stand corrected.  And it is still not my favorite when spelled correctly.

58
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Astringent New England IPA
« on: October 06, 2016, 02:37:12 PM »
If the fear is the sparge, take some hydrometer readings as it runs off and stop if you reach 1.010, then adding the water straight to the kettle to get to the desired pre-boil volume.

Or as Denny says - do like him and batch sparge it (I do).

59
It is so intentionally seasonal, that I doubt you will find a fresh example until next March or so when the American examples start to show up on the early side of spring....  while I don't advocate using beer ranking sites, you could review Beer Advocate under Maibock and get a pretty extensive listing of both German and American versions of the Maibock style.

Rogue Dead Guy is a reasonably good beer, but I don't know that I would call it an epic example of the style.

60
All Grain Brewing / Re: Castle vs Dingemans Pils malt
« on: October 06, 2016, 05:09:03 AM »
I rarely use these Pilsner malts, but Dingeman's is preferred.  Definitely for Belgians. Otherwise my favorite is Best Malz, then Weyermann (floor malted when available), then pretty much a tie between Rahr and Avengard.  And I will say that I don't fuss as to what is available, so Avengard is my most readily available malt and used the most.  I have to drive a ways to get a sack of Best, but will do so on occasion....

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