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Messages - ynotbrusum

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466
All Grain Brewing / Re: age in 15 gal rye barrell
« on: August 12, 2014, 10:54:44 AM »
Interesting to hear that, as well!  Like I said - I'm sticking with my 5 gallon Balcones Bourbon barrel and doing a Solera method for my Flanders batches.  Bretted saison is in glass or a sour-dedicated bucket.  Eventually I may get one of those wide mouth plastic fermenters for fruit beers, but I have enough buckets to justify using them for primary, rather than buying new.

Cheers to the extra info, guys.  I keep learning this hobby, which is part of the fun.  Only a year and a half in on the sours and wood aged beers, (about 8 on regular ales and lagers), so it's good to hear from those of you with more experience.

467
All Grain Brewing / Re: age in 15 gal rye barrell
« on: August 12, 2014, 04:14:17 AM »
I've had plenty of success with oak cubes soaked in my liquor of choice. It's a whole lot easier than messing with barrels

this is part of my point. part of barrel aged character as opposed to wood aged character is the micro oxygenation that happens. This takes time to occur and will be different in a plastic, glass, or stainless vessel than it would in a wooden vessel.

that being said, working with barrels is pretty easy once you've set it all up. I spent a pleasant afternoon 'painting' my barrel with melted bees wax and since then it has been no work at all.

Interesting to hear about the beeswaxing.  I just do the Solera method, but for those who oak with cubes, chips or spirals, I heard someone (John Palmer or Jamil, maybe?) say that using an oak bung allows for slight oxidation on aged beers in glass.  You need to be a bit of a wood carver to make one, I suppose, but an oak dowel in a rubber bung might get similar results.  For me, I have the barrel and it is working well enough, so I'm sticking with it.

468
All Grain Brewing / Re: BIAB: What's necessary and what's not?
« on: August 12, 2014, 04:05:54 AM »
Aluminum will discolor if subjected to extended contact with some of the alkaline cleaners.  I found out when I mixed up some BLC in my gallon sized aluminum pitcher to clean my beer lines.  No great harm, but it now has a ring at the one quart mark....

469
One easy way to tell - next batch sparge with RO or distilled and compare.

470
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: first competition entry
« on: August 12, 2014, 03:56:19 AM »
Agreed, Jim.  Better to have a great beer evaluated as being a great beer than to take home an award on a lesser beer.  Best though would be to win with a great beer properly evaluated to be just that.  Take Denny's Rye IPA, for example.  It's so good even Founders brewed one as the hand out at the NHC.  I saved my bomber to share with friends and it was fantastic.

471
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New guy
« on: August 11, 2014, 11:10:47 AM »
Welcome!  I visited that Athens HBS this past spring when my wife and I visited our daughter (grad student) in Athens - it had just moved from the main drag out to a dirty old warehouse and its future seemed to have been set by those conditions.  Hopefully you can find an alternate LHBS or order online - I try to do both, but prefer to keep my local guy as a priority.

As to the Mountaineers - you gotta like that Jerry West guy - he's still the NBA logo after all these years!

472
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First Brew
« on: August 11, 2014, 04:31:59 AM »
I had a similar experience last month - so I brewed an American Pale Ale, like my first homebrew.  This time all grain and properly pitched and fermentation temperature controlled...it is really good.  Had a bunch of it with friends this past weekend and I'm sure glad I made ten gallons of it.

473
All Grain Brewing / Re: Stout in primary question
« on: August 11, 2014, 04:15:23 AM »
Many of us don't secondary, except when adding fruit or dry hopping or extended aging.

474
All Grain Brewing / Re: Lager color adjustment
« on: August 10, 2014, 07:14:19 PM »
Carafe III and Blackprinz are the 2 I use

475
All Grain Brewing / Re: Lager color adjustment
« on: August 10, 2014, 12:46:38 PM »
Sinamar for color adjustment -yes- but you can also cold steep or add the dark roast at the very end of the mash, if you can live with a trace of roast flavor.

476
Ingredients / Re: Brewing with cabbage (say what?)
« on: August 10, 2014, 10:31:24 AM »
Blackberries are in season.  I added about six pounds that I smashed up to a saison with Brett  it look very purplish.

477
Furthering this thread, how long do you keep the beer on the fruit and do you push down the fruit like winemakers do with the must?  I am concerned about oxidation with the latter and simple thirst on the former!

478
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 09, 2014, 05:32:38 AM »
Good point - Teflon tape will be added to the male threaded stainless QDC on the boil kettle.  I recirc for a while at the end of the boil to sanitize the hosing and pump, also.  I wonder if an air inlet can arise at any connection as the wort chills and the hosing goes from boil to 55F?

479
If you like it, then you have no worries!  My palate is sensitive to certain phenols, but insensitive to diacetyl, so I rarely do a d-rest on my beers.  So whatever works for you is cool.  Maybe the saison just works with that flavor.  I wouldn't try to duplicate it, though.

Enjoy!

480
All Grain Brewing / Re: Burning your bag in BIAB?
« on: August 09, 2014, 05:21:15 AM »
Jeff - I've always wondered if you could run into the infamous HSA (mostly myth at the homebrew level I know, but with too much recirc in this way???). I may try a modified, hillbilly RIMS one of these days to see if there is a discernible difference, since I just did an ultra careful, no splash, rack to boil kettle to see if it results in any discernible difference.

BTW, I have a neighbor who does the drain and pour method while applying heat to a mash that is stepping up through steps or just being boosted to correct mash/mash out and he says he gets no problems doing it that way.  And his beers are really good, too.

With the way I recirculate, where can extra air be introduced? The return is below the mash surface, the pump is not adding air.

I pump to the kettle through the outlet ball valve and dip tube, so the dip tube is covered as quick as if I racked in.

Pilsners brewed this way in the winter stay in good condition to the end of the summer - when they are gone.

I guess you are right, but when I do the recirc during chilling, I get some foaming, at times.

If your light lagers are holding up for months, you don't have stability problems.  Like I said HSA at the homebrew level is said to be a myth.  So, I may have to give it a try.

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