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Messages - quattlebaum

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136
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Force carb vs Keg conditioned
« on: October 07, 2014, 05:49:09 PM »
Yes i agree Co2 is Co2 no matter what source however for some reason there is a distinct difference to me in natural verse forced carb. The mouthfeel seems to be smoother along with head retention is "always" better on my natural carb beers.  There is just something different to me. Perhaps it could be proteins, yeast and what not suspended in solution that gives me this sensation but it is definitely there.  I will say that once naturally carbed i hook it up to co2 to maintain the level and can not tell the difference as time goes on so i suppose it could be all in my head:)   

I guess the difference could be more related to the process and not the co2 itself.

Have you tried a blind triangle on beers carbed each way, say 2 months after carbonation?

No i have not. Ill have to add that one to the list :)  Or just state the obvious that many feel the same way and i should just stop being so stubborn :D

137
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast starter time question
« on: October 06, 2014, 07:51:31 PM »
There is no right time for starters because there are so many variables in the process such as viability of yeast, starter volume, o2, type of yeast and temp. in general if you follow an online pitching calculator it will get you in the range within 24hrs to 36 hrs. I agree with Brewinhard  the more you use your stir plate the more you will become accustomed to the "signs" that it is finished.  I just did one using the same yeast at it was done in 14 hrs also (1000ml) and i placed it in the fridge and crashed for 1 day decanted and pitched within 10 degrees of wort temp.

138
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Force carb vs Keg conditioned
« on: October 06, 2014, 06:33:25 PM »
CO2 is CO2 no matter what the source.  Properly applied CO2 from a tank, allowed to fully dissolve into the beer, will be indistinguishable from any other source.
[/quote]

Yes i agree Co2 is Co2 no matter what source however for some reason there is a distinct difference to me in natural verse forced carb. The mouthfeel seems to be smoother along with head retention is "always" better on my natural carb beers.  There is just something different to me. Perhaps it could be proteins, yeast and what not suspended in solution that gives me this sensation but it is definitely there.  I will say that once naturally carbed i hook it up to co2 to maintain the level and can not tell the difference as time goes on so i suppose it could be all in my head:)   

I guess the difference could be more related to the process and not the co2 itself.

139
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Force carb vs Keg conditioned
« on: October 05, 2014, 05:11:50 PM »
Personally i mostly set to 38F and set to 11 or 12psi and leave it alone however, depending on the style i use a homemade spunding valve.  I will rack the beer to keg when it is around 6 to 8 gravity points away from finial attenuation and set pressure to desired setting for temp and let sit for 2 weeks then hook up to co2 to maintain that level. I enjoy this method and it has its challenges but produces a finer/lacier mouth-feel. 

140
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 AM
« on: September 27, 2014, 07:10:30 AM »
92% conversion efficiency, 91% mash efficiency!
Do you mind sharing you water to grain ratio for your mash?  My mash efficiency was 72% (14 lbs of two row with 1.050 as a pre-boil OG collecting 7.5 gal wort collected) on my last batch and I am trying to decide what to change first, my mill gap (crush looks ok, but I am an all grain noob) or use a thinner mash (been using 1.250 quarts/lb)... I got the calculation from how to brew ( 37 x grain / volume = points; preboil og/ points = mash eff.)  Am I doing this calculation right?  I am batch sparging in a 70 quart cooler with a toliet braid.

If ya want to go down that "efficiency" road play with this.   http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Troubleshooting_Brewhouse_Efficiency
 There is a Efficiency troubleshooting spreadsheet under calculating efficiency that will guide ya in the direction.  Personally i use 1.75qt/lb because thats what works best for my system, EHERMS .

Heres another link that may help.   http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Understanding_Efficiency

Great website for sure. 

141
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Unusual amount of blowoff
« on: September 27, 2014, 05:45:54 AM »
Probably smells like thanksgiving in your house:)
I have had this happen on the 3 pumpkin ales i have made. My assumption is that the yeast are working there butt off to break down the brewing sugars from the pumpkin puree itself. Depending on when you added your puree, boil, mash or primary you may also have a lot of pumpkin material that is binding with the rest of the trub and what not to cause this massive krausen. i have found i need to keep my temp low till 75% complete to keep the fusels at bay. bet it will be tasty 

142
WLP007 is an English yeast not a German yeast.  Just an FYI. ;-)
yes i know WLP007 is an English strain. Maybe i didnt state it clear enough. it seems most "clones" of odells are using an English Strain like 007 however i have read somewhere and a few have said they use a German strain that is a strong top-cropper with medium attenuation and low-medium flocculation. 
I was considering brewing the 90 shilling from "Craft Beer for homebrewers". Maybe ill split a batch and pitch WLP007 and Wyeast 1007 to see which one i prefer or comes close to the original. Thanks fellas 

143
All Grain Brewing / Re: How many BTUs needed for 5-gal batches
« on: September 11, 2014, 04:52:49 PM »
I do 3 Gal batches often and believe it or not i use my camp chef explorer stove that i have for camping. It only has two burners at 30,000 BTUs each. I do not do brew in the bag though. i can heat 3 gals of strike water at 4800' in a reasonable time. i can bring to boil 5 to 6 gallons in a timely manner. It takes me 3.5 to 4 hrs on brew day if i prep the day before. i am in no hurry though its a hobby and i enjoy it. i use to do 5 gal batches on it and it did take longer but not by much. i would start heating my wort while draining my sparge in a large container. Good luck. 

144
Yeast and Fermentation / O'dells House yeast & Craft beer for the homebrewer
« on: September 07, 2014, 05:54:14 PM »
Does anyone know if O'dells brewery uses a German Ale yeast for their house yeast.  Just curious i know they are pretty tight lipped about there beers understandably, but yet have reportedly given one of the recipes in the new book, "Craft Beer for the Homebrewer" and the yeast is WLP 007 

145
Beer Recipes / Oatmeal stout feedback
« on: August 27, 2014, 11:17:54 AM »
Trying to throw an oatmeal stout together. Never brewed one and did a bit of reading and bastardized jamils Zs i think.
Any suggestions. its a 3 gal batch. Think of putting it on nitro. Also considered using pearl as the base malt instead of MO.
 
Recipe: Oatmeal stout
Brewer: Quattlebaum
Asst Brewer:
Style: Oatmeal Stout
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (30.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 4.90 gal
Post Boil Volume: 3.90 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 3.25 gal   
Bottling Volume: 3.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.052 SG
Estimated Color: 28.0 SRM
Estimated IBU: 32.0 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 73.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 84.2 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
4 lbs 1.7 oz          Pale Malt, Maris Otter (Thomas Fawcett)  Grain         1        64.5 %       
9.7 oz                Oats, Golden Naked (Simpsons) (10.0 SRM) Grain         2        9.5 %         
8.4 oz                Pale Chocolate Malt  (200.0 SRM)         Grain         3        8.2 %         
7.1 oz                Biscuit Malt (23.0 SRM)                  Grain         4        7.0 %         
5.9 oz                Roasted Barley (Briess) (300.0 SRM)      Grain         5        5.8 %         
5.1 oz                Crystal, Dark (Simpsons) (80.0 SRM)      Grain         6        5.0 %         
1.01 oz               Goldings, East Kent [5.70 %] - Boil 60.0 Hop           7        32.0 IBUs     
1.0 pkg               SafAle English Ale (DCL/Fermentis #S-04) Yeast         8        -             


Mash Schedule: (208) Single Infusion, Medium Body, No Mash Out, Fly
Total Grain Weight: 6 lbs 5.9 oz
----------------------------
Name              Description                             Step Temperat Step Time     
Mash In           Add 2.79 gal of water at 169.2 F        154.0 F       60 min       

Sparge: Fly sparge with 2.88 gal water at 168.0 F
Notes:
------


146
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I want to brew bigger batches
« on: August 24, 2014, 07:01:40 PM »
The beer is just amazing. I run out too fast..

You must have a lot of thirsty friends.  I went the other way. I brew 3.5-gallon batches that yield 3 gallons of kegged beer.  It takes me four to six weeks to drink that much beer.  I used to brew 5.5-gallon batches that yielded 5 gallons of kegged beer.  Beer would queue up to the point where I would have to dump batches in order to be able to brew.

Same here. I have a fancy 15 Gallon EHerms system that can produce 5 to 10 Gal batches and just have a hard time drinking that much and dump also on occasions (i should be ashamed). Most of mine are 3 Gal also. get through it in 4 to 6 weeks also. Good luck

    82Qt SS Pot. my 62Qt works great for 10gallons on my system
  http://www.bayouclassicdepot.com/1082_stainless_steel_pot.htm


This is a link to mine to possibly give ya some ideas.   http://wildhops.webs.com/apps/photos/album?albumid=13136712

147
Equipment and Software / Homebrew Compatition Coordination Program?
« on: August 13, 2014, 07:05:45 PM »
Does anyone know of a program besides the ones on the BJCP page that one can use to organize a homebrew comp that may be Mac compatible?

148
Ingredients / Re: Storage of Grain
« on: August 12, 2014, 03:20:10 PM »
Rubbermaid cereal container for specialty malts and Gamma lid buckets from walmart for base malts. No problems love them

149
All Grain Brewing / Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« on: August 11, 2014, 08:54:47 PM »
Isomer
In regards to the whirlpool.... I added my hops at flameout and let them steep for 50 mins.  I've read where the hops should go in at lower temps (around 170 degrees) before steeping.  Is there a specific temp to add for aroma?  Will adding at flameout increase bitterness instead of aroma?

Isomerization of hop alpha acids will occur at temps above 185F so yes you will get bitterness. i depend on software to get me somewhat there. Once the temps goes below 185F i think there are just different characteristics that come out of the hops Such as the essential oils such as myrcene, humulene and caryophyllene which could contribute more the aroma.

150
All Grain Brewing / Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« on: August 11, 2014, 08:22:56 PM »
i have found a few things that has helped.

Lots of late hops, fresh hops, low cohumulone, low bicarbonate water and higher gravity like greater than 1.055 which can hide some of the byproducts of large amounts of hops.  Also a simple grain bill and clean yeast. Some say a crap ton of dry but i think it gives to much of a grassy/green flavor. i also whirlpool i really really like the characteristic this gives. 

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