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Messages - pehlman

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1
Equipment and Software / Re: Upgrading Equipment vs Learning Your System
« on: November 07, 2012, 02:28:19 AM »
I guess it really is a little bit of both. There are certain upgrades that could probably make things better, and there are certain things that would only make things easier...

Its probably just a matter of whether something is worth the cost and time needed for an upgrade.

Plus for consistency's sake, its probably good to not keep changing things because then I'll never really learn how to optimize what I have.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: IPA's and Caramel Malts
« on: November 07, 2012, 02:22:16 AM »
I think the key is to select a good flavorful crystal malt, and use no more than necessary. A good medium (50ish SRM) UK crystal is my go-to for pale ales. 4% in my IPA.

That great that you say that... For instance... Sierra Nevada's recipe for Celebration Ale uses about 11-12% of a medium UK crystal malt, which sounds like a lot. At least a lot more than most people would want to use these days in what we now call IPA.

My theory for why it works for them... That chunk of caramel malt is the only other thing in the grain bill besides their 2-row base malt. So maybe its the simplicity of the recipe that allows it to work so well???

I know there are no black and white, 2+2=4 answers here. Im just trying to get opinions. Im just so fascinated by how much they seem to keep things "old school" and against what many brewers seem to be going away from. Yet, they are still arguably one of the best breweries to be producing hoppy beers right now.

3
Equipment and Software / Re: Upgrading Equipment vs Learning Your System
« on: November 06, 2012, 07:54:23 PM »
*I HAVE REPOSTED THIS TOPIC IN THE "EQUIPMENT" CATEGORY*

My bad!

4
Equipment and Software / Upgrading Equipment vs Learning Your System
« on: November 06, 2012, 07:52:20 PM »

Ive come to the point in my brewing where I feel I am at a crossroads. I would really like to make my brew day easier and shorter if possible. More importantly, I would also like to take my quality and consistancy up a few knotches.

So here is my question....

Is it best to put more focus into buying better equipment and having a better system overall?

or... To put less effort and worry into it, and just learn how to fully optimize the system that you currently have? Given the system you are using already does all the basics to a certain extent (mash, lauter, boil, cooling, fermenting, packaging).
 


5
Equipment and Software / Re: Upgrading Equipment vs Learning Your System
« on: November 06, 2012, 07:51:17 PM »
Thanks! That makes a lot of sense!

I think youre right, I did post this in the wrong section... haha. Im going to repost in the equipment section. :)

6
Equipment and Software / Upgrading Equipment vs Learning Your System
« on: November 06, 2012, 07:32:07 PM »
Ive come to the point in my brewing where I feel I am at a crossroads. I would really like to make my brew day easier and shorter if possible. More importantly, I would also like to take my quality and consistancy up a few knotches.

So here is my question....

Is it best to put more focus into buying better equipment and having a better system overall?

or... To put less effort and worry into it, and just learn how to fully optimize the system that you currently have? Given the system you are using already does all the basics to a certain extent (mash, lauter, boil, cooling, fermenting, packaging).
 

7
General Homebrew Discussion / IPA's and Caramel Malts
« on: November 06, 2012, 06:52:47 PM »
So it's no secret that American IPA brewers nowadays (especially here on the west coast) seem to shun the use of much, if any, caramel malts in their IPA's. Many of the the best IPA brewers (Vinnie Cilurzo and Matt Brynildson to name a few) have been very open about their dislike of crystal/caramel malts paired along side american hops.

However...

As I sit here drinking a delicious glass of Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale, it has gotten me thinking. How do they seem to do it so well where as everyone else seems be going so far the other way? Just this season alone, having tried the Celebration Ale, Northern Hemisphere Harvest Ale, Estate Ale, and even a classic like Torpedo... I am SO impressed and intrigued by how well they get that combo of crystal malts and american hops to work together.

Any thoughts???

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry-Hopping Citra DIPA
« on: October 16, 2012, 04:12:05 PM »
Well, if its OK by Matt Brynildson, than its more than OK by me  ;D

I just picked up the new Mitch Steele IPA book, and it is so cool to see all of the different ways brewers go about dry hopping, and all getting such great results. It's too easy to get caught up thinking that there is only one correct way to do something... Whatever makes my beer taste good is what I'd say is correct. HaHa

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry-Hopping Citra DIPA
« on: October 15, 2012, 09:11:14 PM »
I have heard people mention about dry-hopping in the primary fermenter but i was never too sure about how it would turn out. Plus, since Im still using carboys and not a conical, I cant just drop my yeast so I guess it scared me a bit too much to try. But, I guess there is only one way to find out  ;)

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: simcoe bittering
« on: October 15, 2012, 09:04:47 PM »
Go for it. If that's what you've got on hand, there's no sense in not using it. Columbus is one of my absolute favorite aroma hops, but I still bitter with it all the time. There are so many awesome aroma hops out there, that if you can't get Simcoe at some point, it's just an excuse to experiment with something new.

Totally!

If you have enough of it to try something new and different, then why the hell not!? Thats partly why we do this anyway, right?  ;D

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry-Hopping Citra DIPA
« on: October 15, 2012, 08:56:50 PM »
I've been dry hopping in my primary fermenter and skipping racking to a secondary to dry hop.  I just throw the pellets in and let sit for 7 - 10 days.  I would recommend just leaving it in the primary carboy and throw in the hops as scheduled.

I suppose you mean on a homebrew scale I dont have to worry as much about yeast presence during dry-hopping? I could always add just a tad more to compensate? Excuse me if I misunderstood  :P

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Bourbon Porter
« on: October 15, 2012, 08:54:16 PM »
It is not refermenting, because you haven't added anything much that is fermentable.

I agree.

I did a beer much like this a while ago and found that it would bubble for a bit any time I would add something to it. But just because I would move the fermenter around a bit, as well as what tschmidlin said... temperature changes can do the same.

Sounds like quite a flavor bomb. I bet its gonna be great! :) I always find beers like that to take quite well to aging. As the flavors blend together... its a beautiful thing.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Red Hoptober
« on: October 15, 2012, 08:46:19 PM »
Kinda late to this topic im sure... but here it goes.

I really enjoyed it. It kind of reminded me of a Stone Levitation Ale. But I would still take the Stone Levitation over the New Belgium Red Hoptober if forced to choose.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Dry-Hopping Citra DIPA
« on: October 15, 2012, 08:41:54 PM »
So recently I brewed the Kern River Brewing "Citra" double IPA clone from The Jamil Show CYBI on The Brewing Network. Im about 9 days in and Im pretty close to the numbers I should be hitting so far. I had an OG of 1.071 and today Im @ 1.012 ... Goal was 1.010, but I won't lose any sleep over that. So I think it's about time to start dry hopping.

Kern River dry hops this beer at fermentation temp, which is 68F

Here is my question:
Since I am fermenting in a 6.5gal carboy, I am going to transfer to a smaller 5gal carboy for dry hopping. My assumption here is that the smaller carboy will help reduce head space, thus less oxidation. Anyway... The dry-hopping schedule for this beer is 4 separate dry-hop additions over a total of 12 days. One new addition (no, not like Bobby Brown. Thats "Edition" with an E.) every 3 days. Since Im in a carboy, and really would NOT like to rack into a new vessel every 3 days (for multiple reasons), do you think i will be ok just adding the hops to that same carboy each time? That means the first dry hops added will be in contact with the beer for 12 days. Im just hoping that at 68F, 12 days wont be too long and start pulling out harsh, green flavors from the hops. What do you guys think???

PS - Ive heard people mention purging the Oxygen out of secondary fermentation carboys using CO2. This may sound dumb to ask... but how exactly is this usually done?

Is using a keg for secondary overall a better idea?

15
All Grain Brewing / Re: Another water chemistry question.... Sorry
« on: September 02, 2011, 01:18:08 AM »
Yeah, I knew that mg/L was pretty close to PPM... it was just the CaCO3 part that really confused me. Cause Im trying to enter my water stats into the Bru'n Water software and I wanted to make sure I wasn't going to get readings that were way off!

Thanks

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