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Messages - davidgzach

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1381
Beer Recipes / Re: Kolsch Mash Schedule
« on: March 29, 2012, 04:41:34 AM »
There is absolutely no reason to do anything but a single infusion on this style, anywhere between 148-152. Any decoction would be pointless.

Wasn't planning to do a decoction:  double infusion.  But looks like single wins!  I'm going to go at 150 and see how it comes out.

Thanks all!

Dave

1382
Beer Recipes / Kolsch Mash Schedule
« on: March 28, 2012, 04:35:44 PM »
I've been researching Kolsch schedules as it's on my to-do list next weekend.  I've seen single infusion in the 149-152 range as well as a traditional Hochkurz mash at 146 to 158.

I really like Hochkurz mashes but Ray Daniels says single infusion in "Desiging Great Beers".  What say the forum?

Dave

1383
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Starter
« on: March 28, 2012, 11:49:51 AM »
Mr. Malty says 2 vials without a starter.  Honestly, if the production date of the yeast is within the past couple of weeks, I don't think it's a necessity.  However, if it's older than a month, a 1L starter will probably take away any worries.  Gravity should be around 1.035-1.040.

Dave

1384
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lagering quality question
« on: March 28, 2012, 05:48:12 AM »
Thanks Mike.  Makes sense. 

1385
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lagering quality question
« on: March 28, 2012, 05:21:07 AM »
I use 2206 frequently and I don't remember ever having it throw diacetyl.

One of the reasons it's my go-to lager yeast.

SO, I ended up doing a D-Rest for 4 days per the Wyeast recommendation for 2206 and the activity picked up dramatically.  At the start of the D-Rest it was at 1.013 and I kegged it last night at 1.012.  So it dropped a point but that does not seem like a lot for 4 days of activity.  So what was the activity then?  Tom mentioned CO2 release by diacetyl reduction not being part of the pathway.  So what was happening?  As previously stated I thought it was due to the yeast cleaning up the beer but now I'm thoroughly confused..... ???

Sorry to hijack the thread, but it still seems to fit with the OP and subsequent replies.

1386
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 3068 vs 1056 death match...
« on: March 28, 2012, 05:11:40 AM »
GO 1056!

1387
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lagering quality question
« on: March 27, 2012, 12:25:37 PM »
That I cannot answer.  I figured it was the yeast cleaning up.  It was at 1.013 and the top end of the attenuation for the strain.  Maybe it fermented out further?  I'll take another gravity reading today as I'm kegging it.  I hear ya on the 2206 as well.  The sample tasted great.

I must be missing something.  I need a beer..... ???

1388
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lagering quality question
« on: March 27, 2012, 12:10:56 PM »
I seems like fermentation should be finished by this point.

I think he meant that CO2 will come out of solution.

If diacetyl was produced in primary fermentation and a diacetyl rest was not done, the yeast will start to clean the beer if it is raised to 65F and you will see some activity.  I've seen it with my own two eyes!

Dave

Germans don't do diacetyl rests. If the beer was fermented properly, a diacetyl rest is not always necessary. Also, I wouldn't think the yeast would become active just to clean up diacetly. That should only happen if fermentation is not complete.

Americans, Japanese, Belgians, Indians and Eskimos also don't do diacetyl rests so long as they pitch the correct amount of yeast and ferment properly.  However, with some strains a diacetyl rest is still recommended.  See below from the Wyeast website:

"YEAST STRAIN: 2206  |  Bavarian Lager
Used by many German breweries to produce rich, full-bodied, malty beers, this strain is a good choice for bocks and dopplebocks. A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete."
 
All I'm saying is if there is some, and the beer is raised to diacetyl temps, then there will be activity in the airlock.  This just happended to me recently and the beer was feremented out.  Could it have been degassing, I guess, but it lasted a few days.

Dave

1389
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High temp with 1968 / 002?
« on: March 27, 2012, 11:52:58 AM »
I agree, it may not be ideal but 72 is not too high and pitching and starting your fermentation off cool will alleviate most problems from high fermentation temps. I wouldn't recommend going much higher though.

+1.  Yeah, don't take it to 75!

Dave

1390
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lagering quality question
« on: March 27, 2012, 04:54:39 AM »
I seems like fermentation should be finished by this point.

I think he meant that CO2 will come out of solution.

If diacetyl was produced in primary fermentation and a diacetyl rest was not done, the yeast will start to clean the beer if it is raised to 65F and you will see some activity.  I've seen it with my own two eyes!

Dave

1391
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High temp with 1968 / 002?
« on: March 27, 2012, 04:50:22 AM »
You're fine.  That strain can go even higher temp-wise with no ill effects. 

Dave

1392
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lagering quality question
« on: March 26, 2012, 02:24:47 PM »
If you didn't perform a diacetyl rest, don't be surprised if you start to see some activity........

1393
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Table Sugar Starter
« on: March 26, 2012, 01:31:55 PM »
One of the dry yeast manufacturers porduces the yeast using sugar and nutrients.  The ones that say they are gluten free - forget which one. There is a trick to do this.  They continuosly feed the yeast a 10 Plato solution of the sugar and nutrients.  The fermentation pathways are never switched on, so the yeast just grow. Too hard for the homebrewer, as you need to keep the solution in a tight range. I think I read about this on the HBD about 5-10 years back.

If I am out of DME I mash up a couple of pounds of malt.

You know, I've got 40# of 2-row in the basement.  Should have just done that......next time!

1394
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Table Sugar Starter
« on: March 26, 2012, 01:24:30 PM »
I thought there were solid reasons as if it worked, everyone would be doing it!

Some replies:
Yes, I save and wash my yeast.  However, when I brew a lager I still typically make a starter to make sure the yeasties are healthy and ready to go.

I typically buy from Midwest for $11.00, however I had some time to kill and needed DME for my BoPils starter for this weekend's brew.  Had to spend the $$.

The 3# typically lasts me a while.  I was just wondering the specific reasons why we cannot use sucrose.

As always, thanks all!

Zacher

1395
Yeast and Fermentation / Table Sugar Starter
« on: March 26, 2012, 12:15:03 PM »
I plan to buy another chest freezer and use it as my primary lager making fridge so I can brew more than 1 lager over a 3-4 week period.  I currently use our wine cooler in the basement which my wife loves......

However, that means buying a lot of DME to make starters.  As I purchased a 3lb bag for $13.75 at my LHBS, I got to thinking about ways to reduce this cost. 

Since we are only making yeast and not beer, why not use just plain table sugar?  I'm sure there is a scientific reason as to cell walls and mutations due to the sucrose versus maltose, but please enlighten me!

Zacher


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