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Messages - davidgzach

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1486
Ingredients / Re: Weirdest thing: Sulfur Removal tip
« on: October 10, 2011, 01:03:43 PM »
Good trick to know!  Got one for Acetaldehyde?

1487
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« on: October 10, 2011, 11:32:28 AM »
"then condition for a week and straight to keg for secondary."

I thought conditioning occured in the keg/bottle after primary and secondary fermentation?

 "What was the style of beer you were brewing?"

Well, the recipe came from a friend that called it a Creemore Clone. I've added some dextrine malt and some Willamette FWH, so needless to say, I've strayed outside the bounds of a Premium American Lager.  So, at OG 1.060 and ~29 IBU, I think I'll call it an EXTRA Premium American Lager. ;)


Conditioning starts once fermentation is complete.  It's still the same process, just on the yeast cake. 

Sounds like you have quite an interesting brew going here.  You should still get the sour note out of the 2112 but it will be clean at a 62F fermentation.  At 1.060OG did you make a starter?  If not you may get some sulphur and diacetyl.

1488
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« on: October 10, 2011, 11:24:46 AM »
A little trivia-The name Steam Beer came from the pressure that built up inside the kegs that would "steam" when tapped during gold rush San Fran.  We now legally have to call it "California Common" as Anchor Steam trademarked the term "steam".  From our friend Ray Daniels-Designing Great Beers.......
[/quote]

Well WE don't have to call it california common unless we are going to sell it. I actually prefer cali-common now just cause I am grumpy with Mr. Maytag for trademarking the name and don't want to associate my beer with his (Which is good beer, but still grumpy >:()
[/quote]

Agreed!  I still call it a Steam Beer out of pure disregard...... :)

1489
All Grain Brewing / Re: Flawed classic stout
« on: October 10, 2011, 10:36:05 AM »


It wasn't a repitch, it was fresh yeast.  I did not make a starter.  Do you think that could be the problem?  I've actually never made a starter - how important is that?  (I've never understood why it's necessary - yeast seem to multiply so fast that even without a starter my carboy is always vigorously fermenting after 24-48 hours)
[/quote]

Pitching the correct amount of yeast is VERY important to making great beer.  Especially higher gravity ales and any lager.  Underpitched yeast will struggle to multiply and produce off-flavors.  You'll see your carboy vigorously fermenting after 2-3 hours versus 24-48!     ;)

1490
All Grain Brewing / Re: Strong RIS Mash Schedule
« on: October 10, 2011, 10:27:05 AM »
Interested to know what process you ended up using and the OG.  I would have skipped the protein rest as well.  But I might have gone as high as 152 for the single infusion.

Dave

1491
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« on: October 10, 2011, 10:21:06 AM »
Are you after a steam beer? When I am doing a cali-common i do a primary at 60-62f I do a d-rest but I don't know if I really need to. I don't bother with secondary and condition for anywhere from 1 to 6 weeks. This style was historically tapped quite young without any real lagering (think central cali in the 19th century, not a lot of refridgeration)

A little trivia-The name Steam Beer came from the pressure that built up inside the kegs that would "steam" when tapped during gold rush San Fran.  We now legally have to call it "California Common" as Anchor Steam trademarked the term "steam".  From our friend Ray Daniels-Designing Great Beers.......

1492
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« on: October 10, 2011, 10:15:12 AM »
2112 holds lager characteristics up to 68F+.  I use this exclusivery for my Steam Beers.  I've never done a d-rest with this strain and I usually ferment it at around 68.  Primary is typically 5-7 days to ferment, then condition for a week and straight to keg for secondary.  I've tapped it from 1-4 weeks afterwards and always have a great brew.  It's one of my favorite styles and a crowd pleaser.  At 60F it may take a bit longer to ferment, especially if you did not make a starter.

What was the style of beer you were brewing?

Dave

1493
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: using old yeast
« on: October 09, 2011, 07:23:17 AM »
Please report back.  Good to know how this worked out......

Dave

1494
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Starter With Reused Yeast-Trub
« on: October 07, 2011, 05:55:36 PM »
My thoughts as well.  Good to have some backup!  A toast of my very sweet Red Ale to you!   ;D

1495
Yeast and Fermentation / Starter With Reused Yeast-Trub
« on: October 07, 2011, 12:23:35 PM »
I just put some 2112 reused yeast in a starter on my stir plate.  I seem to have some hop leaves in there from the last brew.  More than normal.  What's the best route on this?  Just let it roar for the next 10 hours, decant and pitch or should I take it off, let it settle and transfer at high Krausen to a jug to try to leave the trub behind?

1496
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saving the yeast cake
« on: October 07, 2011, 11:42:53 AM »
ts-You are 100% correct though.  And can you really have a sterilized vessel if you are not working in a sterilized environment?  As soon as you expose the container to ambient air, it runs the risk of infection. 

That's what is great about this forum.  Answering homebrewing's puzzling questions.  Or maybe I had too much of my just tapped Red Ale.  One or the other.  Both are good......TGIF!   :)

1497
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saving the yeast cake
« on: October 07, 2011, 06:45:03 AM »
Hence why you need to rinse thoroughly....... ;)
Which is also why the vessel can no longer be considered sterile.

Right. 
Yeasties need a bit more  protection to be sure, especially if any time is going to pass before re-use. 

When I have a batch fermenting, the day before racking time (from the primary) I take one of my large flasks, boil 800ml of water in it for 15 minutes, cover it with foil, and let it cool.  After racking the beer (which in my case is almost always to a secondary), I dump the now cooled water into the carboy with the yeast, mix  it well, and dump it back into the flask.
Covered with foil (and a rubber band if one is handy) it lives in the fridge until I'm ready to use it for another ferment, generally within a couple weeks.   I've  found washing the yeast to be  unnecessary, even with my habit of 8-9 repitches.
20+ years of doing it that way  has only ever resulted in a lost  crop twice  (once due to a fridge malfunction, and once when I was on tour and waited too long to reuse it for another brew after I returned home). 
Other than that, just keeping it simple and keeping it clean has served well.

I think your last sentence is the point here.  Keep it simple, keep it as clean and sanitized as possible (I will not make the sterilized mistake again) and you'll be fine. 

1498
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saving the yeast cake
« on: October 07, 2011, 06:41:33 AM »
Hence why you need to rinse thoroughly....... ;)
Which is also why the vessel can no longer be considered sterile.

True enough.  But a previously sterilized container, only rinsed with 140F water has treated me very well.  I have not lost a cake yet. 

Totally just jinxed myself.......

1499
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: missed gravity
« on: October 07, 2011, 05:16:25 AM »
Even the pros dump batches occasionally.  Things happen, some you can fix some you can't.  It was still fun brewing. :)

Nice to know others make the same silly mistakes I do.  My last one was leaving my vorlauf alone while I attached my sparge arm.  Lost about a pint of fresh wort...... :-[

It still chokes me up....... :'(

1500
All Grain Brewing / Re: Flawed classic stout
« on: October 06, 2011, 11:30:29 AM »
I had a witbier with about 3g of coriander that the judge said tasted like I had dumped dishsoap into the beer. Some people taste coriander as soapy. I don't. So there's definitely a genetic component to taste you can't account for.

First on this, a judge should NEVER make comment like this!  Poor choice of words......

Secondly, here is a link to Palmer's online version of How to Brew.  I use this a lot when I'm trying to identify flaws.  Hope it helps you as well.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html

Dave

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