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Messages - davidgzach

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721
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lager diacetyl rest...now what?
« on: February 07, 2013, 06:10:37 AM »
A couple of things:
1) You typically do not want to cold crash the beer as opposed to gradually bringing it down to lager temps.  You don't want to shock the yeast.  That being said, it's not the end of the world.  Note for next time. 
2) How long to lager?  Well, how much yeast did you pitch?  Did you make a starter?  If you had a sufficient pitch, you could consume in 3-4 weeks.  If not, I would leave on for 4-6 weeks to let the yeast finish their job cleaning the beer.  What temp did you ferment and for how long?
3) You can prime with sugar for carbonation or force carb when it is done.  Up to you. 

Hope this helps and good luck!

Dave

If you have done a D-rest and cleaned up all of the VDKs and such, you can crash it down so that the Stokes law thing is going for you.

Look at Kai's site (Braukaiser.com) and see the different profiles of temp and time.

Jeff,

This is why I asked my second question.  If there was not a sufficient pitch, then a 3 day D-Rest may not clean up everything and gradual cooling may be preferred.  Kai is assuming a proper pitch rate.  I still think gradual cooling is best practice, but that's just my humble opinion.  As stated, you can make great beer by crash cooling as well.   

Dave

722
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: yeast starter temperature and gravity
« on: February 07, 2013, 05:55:55 AM »
It sounds like two processes are being confused. 

For lagers:

If you make a starter at room temperature, you need to crash cool and decant the ester, sulphur and diacetyl laden "wort" before pitching in to your main wort for primary fermentation.  You hopefully made a lot more yeast but you also made some really bad beer.

However, if you make a starter at primary fermentation temperatures, you can pitch the entire starter in to your wort if you desire.  The starter will take much longer to ferment so timing the brew will be harder to determine.

For ales, you have the choice to pitch the starter directly in to your wort if made at room temps.  Just be sure to calculate it in to your recipe.

Dave

723
+1 to Mort.  If you keg, you can purge the headspace every couple of hours with CO2 for a couple of days.  That usually helps too.

Dave

724
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lager diacetyl rest...now what?
« on: February 06, 2013, 03:54:58 PM »
Dave, since I have primitive temp control, I always just cold crash.  But I do that after a long fermentation ti be sure the yeast is finished.  By doing that I don't need to worry about keeping the yeast active.

That works!

725
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: yeast starter temperature and gravity
« on: February 06, 2013, 11:37:54 AM »
IME, when you make a starter, you are making yeast, not beer.  Room temperature is fine for lager yeast as well.  Most starters are in the 1.035-1.040 range.  What version of HTB do you have?

Dave

726
Events / Re: Congrats to the lucky few
« on: February 06, 2013, 09:10:12 AM »
Does anyone know if this part of Philly is safe to walk at night?  I am looking at the hotels that are north of the big convention center (a few blocks north of our convention) or about an equal distance south.  I figure I won't be the only AHA conventioneer making these treks.

Yes, this part is safe.  However, I would not go more than 1-2 blocks North.  South, East and West are all good for several blocks.  And there are cabs everywhere.

Dave

727
Beer Recipes / Re: Brewing a Barley wine.
« on: February 06, 2013, 08:11:27 AM »
My first was just made and bottled.  It was 95% 2-Row and 5% Crystal 80.  Ray Daniels said to keep the grain bill simple so I did.

It was an American version with Chinook bittering and Cascade flavor and aroma for an IBU of 112.5. 

Looking forward to trying it..........in several months.

Dave

728
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lager diacetyl rest...now what?
« on: February 06, 2013, 08:01:28 AM »
A couple of things:
1) You typically do not want to cold crash the beer as opposed to gradually bringing it down to lager temps.  You don't want to shock the yeast.  That being said, it's not the end of the world.  Note for next time. 
2) How long to lager?  Well, how much yeast did you pitch?  Did you make a starter?  If you had a sufficient pitch, you could consume in 3-4 weeks.  If not, I would leave on for 4-6 weeks to let the yeast finish their job cleaning the beer.  What temp did you ferment and for how long?
3) You can prime with sugar for carbonation or force carb when it is done.  Up to you. 

Hope this helps and good luck!

Dave

729
Events / Re: Congrats to the lucky few
« on: February 05, 2013, 02:52:45 PM »
Yep, took me an hour to get through.  Took the Friday-Saturday package as well.  I'm good with that though.

Dave

730
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottling a Barleywine
« on: February 04, 2013, 02:10:10 PM »
I just bottled a barley wine.

I wracked to an clean sanitized co2 purged keg containing my priming sugar and .5 packets rehydrated yeast (if you do not have access to kegs you can skip to the next section)
I sealed the keg up, gave it a couple good shakes rattle roll to mix everything well
Then I bottled with a bottling wand stuck in the end of the cobra tap.

Mort,

I bottled today.  Cleaned and sanitized a keg, racked the Barleywine, added 3/4 cup of corn sugar, rehydrated 1/2 packet of US-05 and added.  Purged the headspace with CO2, turned down the pressure to about 5psi and filled bottles with my new growler filler that hooks up to my tap. 

This was by far the most enjoyable bottling experience I ever had.  Great idea!  This is now my new process whenever I bottle!

Dave

731
All Grain Brewing / My First Batch Sparge
« on: February 02, 2013, 01:09:14 PM »
Well, it was way to cold to hawk over a fly sparge to make sure my rates were equal so I decided to have a crack at batch sparging.  Funny enough, I started fly sparging when I first switched to all grain and have never done it before.

I have to say.............I like it!   ;D

I drained the first runnings and added 3 gallons of 200F water which brought the mash to 171.  Stirred up and let settle for 5 minutes and drained and then repeated with 3g of 170F water.  The whole process took 10-15 minutes.  NICE!

Ended up at 78% efficiency too!  I may have to do this more often........

Dave

732
All Grain Brewing / Re: protein rest
« on: February 02, 2013, 12:20:50 PM »
A short protein rest can help with efficiency and head retention but as Denny said it is absolutely not necessary and could be detrimental.  Modern malts are much better modified than when that book was written.

Dave

733
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Perplexing
« on: February 02, 2013, 07:36:06 AM »
Thanks Paul.  The last time I used this strain it stalled on me as well.  But that was several years ago before I discovered the magic of proper pitching rates and a stir plate!

I pitched a ton of healthy yeast.  2 stage ramp up for 10 gallons.  I'm sure it was a sufficient pitch and there was ample aeration. 

I'm sure it will be fine.  Just needed to hear it from someone else....

It does make a tasty lager though.  Very crisp and clean!

Dave

734
Yeast and Fermentation / Perplexing
« on: February 02, 2013, 06:27:58 AM »
I made a lager 2 weeks ago and pitched in accordance with Mr. Malty.  I aerated with O2 for 90 seconds and fermentation took off.  I used Wyeast 2278 for a clean Czech Pils. 

Well a week later it stalled at 1.030.  So I decided to raise the temp and brought it up a few degrees a day to 68.  I have another lager in there so I figured it would not hurt it and I could perform a diacetyl rest on that while the former burned out.

Well another week later and I'm only down to 1.020.  It should get to at least 1.015.

RDWHAHB and just wait it out?  It sure seems to be taking a long time.  2 weeks to only 1.020....

Dave

Edit:  And I'm a little worried about the other lager being at 68 for 2 weeks.  Again, RDWHAHB?  The newer one is REALLY tasty though already!  YAY!   ;D

735
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Newbie Kegging Questions
« on: January 31, 2013, 07:56:48 AM »
IME-lack of headspace definitely effects the rate of carbonation.  Pull a few for posterity and the scientific method!

Dave 

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