Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - davidgzach

Pages: 1 ... 62 63 [64] 65 66 ... 111
946
Just about to start sparging my Pumpkin Ale.  The neighbors just polished off the last of the 2011 batch which was quite tasty for an 8.3% brew.

Dave

947
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: stuck at 1.020
« on: November 23, 2012, 06:24:50 AM »
Our beer tastes good but seems to be a bit "starchy."  We usually mash at 149, then raise the temp to 155, then raise it again to 165 and sparge for 60-90 minutes with boiling water.

In regards to tannin extraction, I'm assuming you are fly sparging since it's taking 60-90 minutes.  Since you are starting your sparge at 165F, I'm still betting your grain bed is over 180F if not over 190F by the time you are finished.  I'm betting the $25 in my pocket that is the culprit behind the "starchy" flavor.

Try not going to mash out and starting your sparge from 155F as this will proababy get your grain bed to around 172-175F.  Or, sparge with 175-180F water. 

Dave

948
All Grain Brewing / Re: I am back!
« on: November 23, 2012, 05:52:19 AM »
That's wonderful news!  I'm sure those beers are going to be very sweet!

Dave

949
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mold spots in bottom of air lock bottle.
« on: November 22, 2012, 06:49:23 AM »
Yep, RDWHAHB....

950
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: stuck at 1.020
« on: November 21, 2012, 09:06:43 AM »
Would you happen to be using a refractometer to test the FG?

That's a good one....

951
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: stuck at 1.020
« on: November 21, 2012, 07:35:54 AM »
I think you have it covered here:
1) Evaluate yeast strain and amount being pitched.
2) Make sure you are aerating very well.
3) Try not sparging with boiling water. (I do this and have not had a problem with 10G)
4) Try a single infusion mash without mashout. (Actually, if you are raising to 165F and then sparging with boiling water, this could be it.  That means your mash is probably getting past 180F+.  I'm getting to mash out temps with boiling water from ~150F)
5) Double check your hydrometer.

It's got to be in there somewhere.....

Dave

952
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mold spots in bottom of air lock bottle.
« on: November 21, 2012, 07:28:46 AM »
Do you have a blow-off tube in the 5 gallon jug?  That's my guess Euge....

Dave

953
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentation Control During Cold Winters
« on: November 20, 2012, 06:23:45 AM »
I would definitely start with an Ale upstairs or a Steam Beer in the basement.  Your upstairs is perfect for just about any ale yeast and the basement is perfect for Wyeast 2112/White Labs 810 SanFran Lager. 

Northern Brewer or Midwest Supplies would be a great start for kits and questions along the way.  Midwest has always treated me very well.

Enjoy your first brew!

Dave

954
All Grain Brewing / Re: Step Mashing? Important?
« on: November 19, 2012, 02:32:59 PM »
SO, if you build a RIMS and start experimenting, you can come back in a year or so and let us know what you have found out!  Then we can have this debate all over again!   ;D

You'll make a lot of good beer in the process, and have the ability to make a Hefe the right way..... ;)

Dave

955
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: I'm a Believer!
« on: November 19, 2012, 10:34:50 AM »
Man, I never get yeast that fresh...it's always at least a month old.

Me too!  The stars lined up for me I guess.  But I was shocked at how fast it burned out on the stir plate.

Dave

956
All Grain Brewing / Re: Step Mashing? Important?
« on: November 19, 2012, 10:14:42 AM »
Depends more on the type of beer you want to make than the malts now.  If you have under-modified malt, then it's very important.  I haven't run in to any though.

However, for certain beer styles, especially German, you may want to rest at various temperatures.  For instance you really want a ferulic acid rest at 111-113F to bring out the clove in a Hefeweisen. 

Dave

957
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentation Control During Cold Winters
« on: November 19, 2012, 09:03:06 AM »
hi new brewer here, as im getting close to starting my first batch im having worries about keeping my fermenter at proper temps, now the whole house is usually below 65, when no one is home then heats up to 68 when im home, now my question is, what do i do to get my fermenter above those temps? much thanks appreciated

Why do you want your fermenter above those temps? 

958
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: November 16, 2012, 09:09:38 AM »
I've been reading this thread from the start.  Posted a few times I think.  I tried something new with my past couple of German Lagers that has really changed the game for me and made that "wow, that's amazing" beer. 

This may be back there somewhere, but I have been lagering on the cake, in primary for 2-3 weeks before kegging.  I'll let it finish out, raise it to 65F if it's not at FG, then bring it down 2-3F every day until I'm at 36F.  I leave it there for 2-3 weeks, then keg and continue lagering until I need a beer on tap.  I took one out the other day that was kegged for only a week as an emergency party continuer, and it was great.  Not only clean, but really had "That German Lager Flavor". 

Just passing along my experience with this.

Dave

959
Yeast and Fermentation / I'm a Believer!
« on: November 16, 2012, 05:16:08 AM »
In fresh yeast that is.  I have been planning a Sammy Smith Nut Brown Ale Clone and called my LHBS last week about the Yorkshire Square Yeast which is rumored to be from the Sam Smith Brewery.  They had one in transit and mailed it out the day it got in.  The production date was 11/5 which means it was a week old.  I made a 3L starter yesterday afternoon and by 11:00PM I swear it was done!  In about a 3 hour span last night it went from small bubbles to egg drop soup.  Truly amazing and the fastest I've ever had a 3L starter burn out.  About 10 hours!

Dave

960
Ingredients / Re: Munich and Wheat
« on: November 15, 2012, 08:58:19 AM »

Quote from: 2008 BJCP GuidelinesCategory: 15B
Ingredients: By German law, at least 50% of the grist must be malted wheat, although some versions use up to 70%; the remainder is usually Munich and/or Vienna malt. A traditional decoction mash gives the appropriate body without cloying sweetness. Weizen ale yeasts produce the typical spicy and fruity character, although extreme fermentation temperatures can affect the balance and produce off-flavors. A small amount of noble hops are used only for bitterness.

it'll be fine... ;D


Nice call Blatz!

Pages: 1 ... 62 63 [64] 65 66 ... 111