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Messages - HoosierBrew

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1
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Trimmed Dip Tube when Spunding?
« on: February 23, 2017, 07:33:51 PM »
IIRC Bryan posted that he waits until after FG then gives the keg a quick swirl or two, then pumps out a big slug of yeast. Then waits an hour and does it again. Gonna start doing that.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: February 23, 2017, 05:23:16 PM »
Quote from: stpug link=topic=27965.msg379421#msg379421
I meant to ask "How many times have YOU taken a blind triangle test of these two beers?" and how many times right/wrong. 


Ok, blindfolded myself and had my wife pour triangle style. Did it twice. Picked out the different beer both times. Both times I preferred the low O2. With this beer at least, it's just honestly not that tough - it's a malty style and the low O2 has more malt aroma and flavor, and for lack of a better word, is 'softer' around the edges. Another $0.02. .

Very good and thanks for testing yourself.  I would conclude that you prefer your low oxygen process beer over your regular process beer :o.  That's awesome that the difference is so pronounced in what should effectively be identical beers.  The assumption is that it's purely the limiting of oxygen during the brewing process (both hot and cold side) that made such a difference.  I look forward to any future batch comparisons you may do.  Thanks for sharing.


Sure. And I'm curious myself to see if the difference is as pronounced in other styles. We'll see.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: February 23, 2017, 05:11:35 PM »
Quote from: stpug link=topic=27965.msg379421#msg379421
I meant to ask "How many times have YOU taken a blind triangle test of these two beers?" and how many times right/wrong. 


Ok, blindfolded myself and had my wife pour triangle style. Did it twice. Picked out the different beer both times. Both times I preferred the low O2. With this beer at least, it's just honestly not that tough - it's a malty style and the low O2 has more malt aroma and flavor, and for lack of a better word, is 'softer' around the edges. Another $0.02. .

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Got a brewday disaster story?
« on: February 23, 2017, 12:46:05 PM »
Man, it runs the gamut in terms of all my screwups!

1/ 2 broken carboys where I got stitches.

2/ Scorched DME and LME that didn't get stirred, as posted above.

3/ Brewing a double batch and pitching the wrong strain into the wrong wort.

4/ Same as above, but wrong hops into wrong wort.

5/ Broken glass thermometer into my wort.  Yeah, wow.


Many others. I learned how to be creative with the profanity.

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: February 23, 2017, 10:04:25 AM »
It sounds like the actual testing session was completed successfully.  Were the participants privy to the pour or blinded from that as well?  How many times have YOU taken a blind triangle test, and how many times were you correct (you should probably -literally- wear a blindfold)?

Aside from that, ignoring anyone else's input, can you describe the difference in aroma and flavor between the two, and the "degree" to which they are different?


I've taken several triangles, non blindfolded. Been right and been wrong depending on the premise.No one was allowed to see me pour, and, as I mentioned, I used opaque cups since there is a color difference.

For me, I feel the low O2 beer definitely has more and better malt aroma and flavor. More complexity in aroma and flavor. The difference is even more noticeable now as the traditional beer is around 2 months old and its malt character seems to have faded some already. No fading at all on the other. And the mouthfeel is softer and 'drinkability' better on the low O2. As said, both are good beers but the low O2 is just plain excellent. And superior IMO.

Darn it; I asked that wrong. My apologies.  I meant to ask "How many times have YOU taken a blind triangle test of these two beers?" and how many times right/wrong.  I guess I'm just wondering if the difference between these beers when you're put in the hot seat is so stark that it's a no-brainer to tell them apart, or if it becomes much harder once you're not part of the process.  Sorry, my fault for not phrasing that correctly the first time.


I haven't done that. I'll do it and report back. Side by side many times, no blindfold. I honestly believe I'm being objective when I say that one is noticeably better, but no harm in doing it.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: February 23, 2017, 08:20:24 AM »
Gonna reluctantly post a triangle test I did today on the Dunkels I brewed on 12/28. Please take it as it's intended, as a single data point. No broad pronouncement or indictment of anyone here, or how they choose to brew. Couldn't care less. Really.   :)

Here is the triangle test. Finally got the group of friends I wanted all in the same room, no small feat. The idea was to have mostly brewers with a few non brewers, to show applicability across a wider group of people. 8 people total, 6 good brewers, 2 wine and craft beer fanatics with good palates. This is only intended to show tasting preference, not to rise to laboratory paper level.

I brewed 2 dunkels on 12/28, one my traditional method (Narziss style temp rise @ 60% attenuation), the other low O2 style (46 F held throughout), in addition to the other stated methods. I was diligent and lucky, and achieved 1.052 OG on both, 1.010 FG on both. Same grist (double weighed), strain (2206), mash pH (5.2), and step schedule. The low O2 beer is noticeably lighter in color, so I used opaque cups to avoid any presumed prejudice. I will post a pic soon, as the one I took today didn't do justice to the difference (it was cloudy outside).

Results:

Of the 8 people, 6 could tell a difference between the samples (one brewer, one non brewer could not).

Of the 6 people who noticed a difference, 5 preferred the low O2 Dunkel.

Comments from the people who preferred the low O2 beer:

"Amazing malt aroma and flavor".
"Better malt character and softer character".
"Great malt character and drinkability".
"More defined malt. Great malt aroma".
"Better beer. Softer, more drinkable. Awesome malt character".

Just a data point. Both are good beers. My prior assessment was that the low O2 is far better. Nothing changes my feeling there. Only $0.02 .

It sounds like the actual testing session was completed successfully.  Were the participants privy to the pour or blinded from that as well?  How many times have YOU taken a blind triangle test, and how many times were you correct (you should probably -literally- wear a blindfold)?

Aside from that, ignoring anyone else's input, can you describe the difference in aroma and flavor between the two, and the "degree" to which they are different?


I've taken several triangles, non blindfolded. Been right and been wrong depending on the premise.No one was allowed to see me pour, and, as I mentioned, I used opaque cups since there is a color difference.

For me, I feel the low O2 beer definitely has more and better malt aroma and flavor. More complexity in aroma and flavor. The difference is even more noticeable now as the traditional beer is around 2 months old and its malt character seems to have faded some already. No fading at all on the other. And the mouthfeel is softer and 'drinkability' better on the low O2. As said, both are good beers but the low O2 is just plain excellent. And superior IMO.

7
The Pub / Re: Beer Criticism
« on: February 23, 2017, 07:08:17 AM »

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: February 22, 2017, 08:55:39 PM »
Gonna reluctantly post a triangle test I did today on the Dunkels I brewed on 12/28. Please take it as it's intended, as a single data point. No broad pronouncement or indictment of anyone here, or how they choose to brew. Couldn't care less. Really.   :)

Here is the triangle test. Finally got the group of friends I wanted all in the same room, no small feat. The idea was to have mostly brewers with a few non brewers, to show applicability across a wider group of people. 8 people total, 6 good brewers, 2 wine and craft beer fanatics with good palates. This is only intended to show tasting preference, not to rise to laboratory paper level.

I brewed 2 dunkels on 12/28, one my traditional method (Narziss style temp rise @ 60% attenuation), the other low O2 style (46 F held throughout), in addition to the other stated methods. I was diligent and lucky, and achieved 1.052 OG on both, 1.010 FG on both. Same grist (double weighed), strain (2206), mash pH (5.2), and step schedule. The low O2 beer is noticeably lighter in color, so I used opaque cups to avoid any presumed prejudice. I will post a pic soon, as the one I took today didn't do justice to the difference (it was cloudy outside).

Results:

Of the 8 people, 6 could tell a difference between the samples (one brewer, one non brewer could not).

Of the 6 people who noticed a difference, 5 preferred the low O2 Dunkel.

Comments from the people who preferred the low O2 beer:

"Amazing malt aroma and flavor".
"Better malt character and softer character".
"Great malt character and drinkability".
"More defined malt. Great malt aroma".
"Better beer. Softer, more drinkable. Awesome malt character".

Just a data point. Both are good beers. My prior assessment was that the low O2 is far better. Nothing changes my feeling there. Only $0.02 .
Why reluctant?  I think most folks are looking for opinions one way or the other.  I am!  Thanks for sharing!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk




It's been a pretty divisive issue lately, unfortunately, JT. Thanks, man ! Brewing beer is pretty damn fun, that's where I'm at.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: February 22, 2017, 08:30:09 PM »
Gonna reluctantly post a triangle test I did today on the Dunkels I brewed on 12/28. Please take it as it's intended, as a single data point. No broad pronouncement or indictment of anyone here, or how they choose to brew. Couldn't care less. Really.   :)

Here is the triangle test. Finally got the group of friends I wanted all in the same room, no small feat. The idea was to have mostly brewers with a few non brewers, to show applicability across a wider group of people. 8 people total, 6 good brewers, 2 wine and craft beer fanatics with good palates. This is only intended to show tasting preference, not to rise to laboratory paper level.

I brewed 2 dunkels on 12/28, one my traditional method (Narziss style temp rise @ 60% attenuation), the other low O2 style (46 F held throughout), in addition to the other stated methods. I was diligent and lucky, and achieved 1.052 OG on both, 1.010 FG on both. Same grist (double weighed), strain (2206), mash pH (5.2), and step schedule. The low O2 beer is noticeably lighter in color, so I used opaque cups to avoid any presumed prejudice. I will post a pic soon, as the one I took today didn't do justice to the difference (it was cloudy outside).

Results:

Of the 8 people, 6 could tell a difference between the samples (one brewer, one non brewer could not).

Of the 6 people who noticed a difference, 5 preferred the low O2 Dunkel.

Comments from the people who preferred the low O2 beer:

"Amazing malt aroma and flavor".
"Better malt character and softer character".
"Great malt character and drinkability".
"More defined malt. Great malt aroma".
"Better beer. Softer, more drinkable. Awesome malt character".

Just a data point. Both are good beers. My prior assessment was that the low O2 is far better. Nothing changes my feeling there. Only $0.02 .


10
Commercial Beer Reviews / Green Flash Fearless 50
« on: February 22, 2017, 04:40:03 PM »
I meant to post this review last night, but this is a saison with sweet orange peel, rose hips, and El Dorado hops, brewed for Trader Joe's 50th anniversary. Honestly, it raised red flags - a 'saison' brewed by a brewery known for mostly hoppy beers, with orange peel, rose hips (which have to be used in tiny amounts to keep me from spitting it out), and El Dorado hops which aren't my favorite and easily dominate. A recipe for $5.99 down the drain.

But it's a surprisingly good beer. First off, amazingly enough, it actually uses a saison strain , a huge pet peeve for American beers labeled as saison that.....aren't. 3711 by my estimation. It's very well attenuated, another frequent pet peeve. Thankfully, the orange peel is subtle and the rose hips as well, thankfully so (worried me considerably). And the El Dorado are far from up front - definitely no IPA/saison. I really like it and will buy more. Don't get me wrong - it won't overtake Dupont any time soon,  but it's an actual legit American saison at a nice price point.
 

11
Beer Recipes / Re: CAP recipe
« on: February 22, 2017, 12:53:22 PM »
I must be slow today - what's a CAP?

Classic American Pilsner, aka, Pre-Prohibition Pilsner, aka, Pre Bud/Coors swill.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Never a shortage
« on: February 22, 2017, 07:51:42 AM »
Pretty cool!

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: February 22, 2017, 05:48:33 AM »
Great looking cream ale, JT !

14
Beer Recipes / Re: CAP recipe
« on: February 21, 2017, 05:43:28 PM »
Is this a beer style that people actually like? I've never made one, but it just doesn't sound like an interesting beer to drink.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
They can be really good. I brew them about once a year. If you like a crisp refreshing Lager in the summertime, this is a good one to brew.

I like a crisp refreshing lager in the summertime for sure. I guess it is the corn that I am hung up on. What does it bring to the beer?


It lightens body,  but also brings a subtle sweetness to the party. Corn is a vastly superior adjunct to rice IMHO.

15
Beer Recipes / Re: CAP recipe
« on: February 21, 2017, 04:38:01 PM »
+1, I like them . 80 2 row (used to be 6 row)/ 20 flaked maize. Cluster to bitter, noble late. Good stuff.

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