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Messages - HoosierBrew

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106
I would have to disagree with the temp control part (at the very least) on that list. :o  .

There's less need for it where I live (UK) - never very hot and not much seasonal variation. However, I do keep my ferments cool as I've had nasty hangovers from rare summer heatwaves.

I do think temp control helps a little. But it doesn't take beer to "the next level" - plenty of brulosophy experiments to back that up.

"The next level" is 99% placebo effect. That's not to say placebos don't work - they can be very effective, especially where subjective judgement is concerned.


Like I said, I made pretty good beer in a cool basement and get that the climate is different as a whole in the UK. But calling fridge/controller temp control placebo effect just isn't accurate IMO. I do see it as 'next level'. It offers an array of benefits (reducing heat generated from fermentation, better control of esters, phenols and fusels, precise temp schedule for beers that need it, better foam at cooler fermentation temps, etc.) Regardless, I don't doubt that your beer is good. We can agree to disagree and that's perfectly fine.

I used to agree 100%, as it was what I read everywhere on the internet. The problem is, the brulosophy experiments just haven't found much of an effect. I still do temp control, I'm just not convinced by all the claims made in its favour any more.

Historically it was a great way to maintain sanitary conditions as cool ferments excluded most bacteria and wild yeasts. Keeping those out meant a cleaner ferment and less funky flavours.

The idea that fermenting warm allows yeast to express it's character better through esters is dubious, I think. I need to see empirical evidence of perceptible effects - anecdotal doesn't sway me any more.

Happy to be proved wrong as it's very easy for me to control fermentation temp with my setup.



That point was that esters are more easily controlled by being able to control fermentation temps precisely, not an argument about warm vs cold effect on esters. As for Marshall, I appreciate his contributions but don't take them as gospel. Or any other one person's for that matter.

107

By this logic no one would do anything to make better beer because it wouldn't make much of a difference.  Go ahead, you keep not caring about taking your beer to the next level - I choose otherwise. 

And I can easily demonstrate the difference between excellent and poor beer.  It is dramatic, and it is not rooted in confirmation bias, it is rooted in process, equipment, ingredients, recipe design, etc.





Yup.

108
I would have to disagree with the temp control part (at the very least) on that list. :o  .

There's less need for it where I live (UK) - never very hot and not much seasonal variation. However, I do keep my ferments cool as I've had nasty hangovers from rare summer heatwaves.

I do think temp control helps a little. But it doesn't take beer to "the next level" - plenty of brulosophy experiments to back that up.

"The next level" is 99% placebo effect. That's not to say placebos don't work - they can be very effective, especially where subjective judgement is concerned.


Like I said, I made pretty good beer in a cool basement and get that the climate is different as a whole in the UK. But calling fridge/controller temp control placebo effect just isn't accurate IMO. I do see it as 'next level'. It offers an array of benefits (reducing heat generated from fermentation, better control of esters, phenols and fusels, precise temp schedule for beers that need it, better foam at cooler fermentation temps, etc.) Regardless, I don't doubt that your beer is good. We can agree to disagree and that's perfectly fine.

109
Not so funny story about cloudy NE beers. My local brew pub got a keg of 3F's Zombie Dust (Not a NE IPA) over the weekend. The first one was perfect and crystal clear. My second pour was very cloudy. I asked the bartender if the keg kicked on that pour. He said, "No. I just went back and lifted the keg to see how much was left. I must have kicked up the trub. It's actually better now that it's cloudy." Facepalm... No. Now I have one of the best and hard to get IPA's in the country that has yeast and whatever else unwanted sediment mixed up in it. These people believe that if you mix all the trub up, you get a "juicy NE IPA." I wanted to smack the guy.


Yeah, that's pretty ridiculous. Just like the quality of craft beer is spotty, so is the quality of the people pouring it. Just dumb.

110
All Grain Brewing / Re: Glass Disaster
« on: January 09, 2017, 10:36:59 AM »
I hear milk crates make excellent carboy carriers.
Yes, even better than the straps they sell. The only time I ever came close to breaking a carboy after moving them hundreds of time is the first time I tried the strap thingy.

I kept all my glass in crates, before I cracked one while cleaning it (outside of the crate).  I got rid of the glass, but still use my crates for better bottles.

If you're using glass carboys, crates are the best way to go.  Protects them on the sides and gives convenient handles for lifting/moving.


I did the same - I moved carboys with milk crates but broke one while cleaning it out of the crate. The other one I broke - here's a good brain fart - by picking it up by one of those handles they sold with the wing nut. I knew not to trust it to support the load. I think it was my second batch ('93ish). Stitches. Glad I kept on brewing anyway.


Edit -  Kids were the X factor for me as well.

111
I would have to disagree with the temp control part (at the very least) on that list. :o  . And having done a couple lodo batches, I disagree there as well. Not meant as trying to argue, to each his own. I agree that not every single 'X taking your beer to the next level' is the case in reality.

Temperature control for sure. Before any equipment upgrades beyond a basic starter kit, I'd tell a new home brewer to find a temperature control solution ASAP. For me, that made a world of difference for my beer when I was starting out. But this is also very situation dependent. If you live somewhere with a basement/concrete floor that remains at a stable cool-ish temp, to me that is temp control. I didn't have that as an option starting out and made some awful beer my first few batches because of wildly swinging temps.



Yeah, a cool basement with a steady temp is a definite improvement over a warm closet for sure. The only issue being it doesn't do anything to account for the heat generated by fermentation the way a fridge/controller would. But I started brewing in a basement with a carboy on a concrete floor and made pretty good beer. More importantly, I forgot about this thread being a 'no argue' thread. My bad.

112
I would have to disagree with the temp control part (at the very least) on that list. :o  . And having done a couple lodo batches, I disagree there as well. Not meant as trying to argue, to each his own. I agree that not every single 'X taking your beer to the next level' is the case in reality.

113
All Grain Brewing / Re: Glass Disaster
« on: January 09, 2017, 06:18:42 AM »
I'd say if you are going to plastic, just use buckets. Lowes sells some great food grade buckets in the 5 gallon size.
I agree. For primary fermentation I prefer a food grade plastic bucket to a plastic carboy. The scratch thing is a non issue if you never use anything more abrasive than a Terry cloth. The buckets are way easier to clean and way easier to take gravity samples out of. Also plastic buckets can be washed with hot water while the plastic carboys melt with very hot tap water.
Keep your glass carboys, they will come in handy if you want to condition a high gravity beer and will be indespensible if you get into making mead.


^^ Preaching to the choir. I started in carboys,broke a couple, got cut badly, and (having kids) made the switch to buckets. I have no more infections than before. Actually far fewer because my overall process is better. I agree the 'scratches harboring bacteria' thing is a non issue and overstated if you don't scrub with something that would create scratches. I scrub with a wash cloth. Having said that, I'm hoping to get a couple Brewbuckets this year. They're nice.

114
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: January 08, 2017, 06:18:56 PM »
Those all look awesome, man.

115
IPAs are the autotuned pop music of the brewing world.  Flashy.  Popular.  Uninspired and requiring very little talent to produce.

Ahh.  That IS unpopular.  And I have to call BS.  Just like any other beer style it is easy to brew, but very difficult to brew well.

Maybe you just don't like the style, or the fact that IPAs are extremely popular, or both.  I was counseled once by a professor who said if you are going to judge a genre well, you must enjoy the genre.
Yep. Most breweries brew crap, maybe subpar, IPAs. Very few brew good to great examples.


Agreed. There are good and bad examples of EVERY style, with the mediocre to bad ones being more common than the really good ones. As said, it IS fairly easy to brew IPA, pretty difficult to brew a great one. Generalizations are lame.

116
All Things Food / Re: why can't you people simply say...
« on: January 08, 2017, 04:21:57 PM »
What shape does your butter come in?  Small molds of the Mannequin Pis?


Bwahahaha. ;D.   As it melts the butter runs out of its....................

117
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: January 08, 2017, 02:30:08 PM »

My latest American Barleywine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


That is a great looking beer. Nice foam considering the abv.

118
All Things Food / Re: why can't you people simply say...
« on: January 08, 2017, 12:36:10 PM »
Arguing about using 113 instead of one of a single unit is akin to arguing the use of 3.14 instead of π in a calculation. (IOW, There's a time and a place for both... :P)


Yeah.  :)

119
I use one but don't trust the SG reading. I take the Brix measurement and convert it to SG. Don't use it for FG at all.

120
Congrats, Michael! Well done.

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