Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - HoosierBrew

Pages: 1 ... 11 12 [13] 14 15 ... 431
181
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: harshness from keg hops
« on: June 05, 2015, 08:59:21 AM »
FWIW, my current procedure is to dry hop in the keg in a paint strainer bag, but also use a sure screen on the dip tube to catch any stray particulate that gets through the paint bag. Which is next to nothing. Hops are great, hop matter in the glass, not so great.

182
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: keys to a crisp lager
« on: June 05, 2015, 08:55:21 AM »
pH is a big part of getting a crisp, lager like character. I like a pH of 5.3 for pale lagers.

and sulfate

+1  That northern german pils you had of mine Jon is mash PH 5.2ish, 100pm sulfate driven by epsom, and 40ish IBU

Ok cool. Well it was excellent . Spot on. Looks like I will shoot for 5.2 then on pale lagers!  Like I edited, the tartness on saisons had to be from the yeast.

183
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Green Beers
« on: June 05, 2015, 07:49:40 AM »
The aging of traditional Brit IPAs was not to gain some benefit, it was the nature of transportation by ship.

^^This^^

184
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: keys to a crisp lager
« on: June 05, 2015, 07:46:33 AM »
Do you think temperature is partly to blame as well?

As the beer is lagered and gets clear it'll taste cleaner and crisper to a degree. I don't think it's a temp issue as much as a pH thing. 


185
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: keys to a crisp lager
« on: June 05, 2015, 07:22:14 AM »
Yeah I think I was at 5.4 for this guy

Actually, I've read some brewers here going down closer to 5.25 - 5.2 for light lagers.   I use 5.2 for saison and it gives a slight tartness that I'm not sure I'd want in a lager.  I might try 5.25 some time, though.  I like 5.3 though.


EDIT - There's a good chance that some of the tartness from the saison may come from the yeast strains though, come to think of it.

186
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: keys to a crisp lager
« on: June 05, 2015, 07:15:25 AM »
pH is a big part of getting a crisp, lager like character. I like a pH of 5.3 for pale lagers.

187
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Green Beers
« on: June 05, 2015, 06:31:58 AM »
Even American Ales (PA, AA, AIPA) will typically take about 3 weeks, IME, for optimal flavor.  2 weeks in the fermenter and then a week in the keg.  That's the relax part of the mantra.  Don't get hyper and rush the beer.

+1.  That's my version of 'aging' for APA and especially AIPA.  I'll tap at 3 weeks minimum, usually 4, to round out the flavors. Occasionally I'll use a hop combo for IPA that's still a little 'green' at 3 weeks, but is rocking at 4 weeks.

188
All Grain Brewing / Re: Big brew Barleywine
« on: June 05, 2015, 06:22:12 AM »
And I can't say I've ever had a beer that seemed thin that finished at 1.017, barleywine or not.

Yeah.  That would be anything but thin in any beer.

189
All Grain Brewing / Re: Big brew Barleywine
« on: June 05, 2015, 04:47:32 AM »
Transferred my Big Brewday Barleywine to secondary today with a Medium+ oak spiral which had been soaking in Knob Creek.

The SG measured 1.017

Should I be worried about it being too 'thin'?
Thanks



Not at all.  It's difficult, if not impossible, to brew a thin barleywine. A big malty beer that starts with an OG as high as barleywine leaves a ton of malty character in your beer regardless of your FG.  Think of the  Belgian Quads -  they're essentially Belgian barleywines and they all finish low and have tons of malty richness.  FWIW, I mash barleywines @ 148F for 90 minutes, they finish fairly low, and have a ton of body and richness.

190
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Charles from California
« on: June 04, 2015, 02:47:04 PM »
Welcome Charles  ;)     Nice catch by the way.

191
All Things Food / Re: cooking with habaneros
« on: June 04, 2015, 09:50:43 AM »
I consistently have issues just handling jalapenos without gloves. I tend to touch or wipe my eye aftereward and it is over...

Ah, yes, and also remember to wash your hands BEFORE you use the restroom!

Haha...good call! I have tried washing my hands multiple times, coating with olive oil but nothing seems to to work...Luckily I haven't had any of the issues you are referring to...

On that note I'll share a cautionary tale -  I ONCE went to the bathroom after making a blazing bottle of habanero/Thai dragon pepper hot sauce and paid the price.  Suffice it to say............well, draw your own conclusions. Not good.   ;)

Ha! Once is enough for sure...gloves. Soap doesnt always get the oils off.  I found out the hard way. jerry lee lewis style.

Goodness, gracious!

Took me a minute to catch on. That's beautiful.  ;D

192
All Things Food / Re: cooking with habaneros
« on: June 04, 2015, 09:27:15 AM »
I consistently have issues just handling jalapenos without gloves. I tend to touch or wipe my eye aftereward and it is over...

Ah, yes, and also remember to wash your hands BEFORE you use the restroom!

Haha...good call! I have tried washing my hands multiple times, coating with olive oil but nothing seems to to work...Luckily I haven't had any of the issues you are referring to...

On that note I'll share a cautionary tale -  I ONCE went to the bathroom after making a blazing bottle of habanero/Thai dragon pepper hot sauce and paid the price.  Suffice it to say............well, draw your own conclusions. Not good.   ;)

193
All Things Food / Re: cooking with habaneros
« on: June 04, 2015, 08:04:39 AM »
They can be dried as well.  They retain their flavor and heat for a long, long time.

+1 That is what I do with mine.
Another good idea. I did this with ghost chiles we grew last year. You can then cut a small piece off at a time to add a little heat to something on the fly.

+2.  I grow a variety of chiles and pretty much do everything - dry them, freeze them, hot sauces, chili garlic pastes, etc. Love some chiles.
Yes, and when I make hot sauce that gets cooked I now do it outside. The same goes for processing horseradish. We made some extra hot sirachha a couple years ago and we were tearing up, the dog was whining and the cat was meowing.


Ouch  ;D    My favorite is taking the lid off the blender when I've made a batch of fire breathing sauce. It's like a punch in the face where you cough uncontrollably.

194
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Brewer Bio: Chris in Colorado
« on: June 04, 2015, 08:02:12 AM »
With Photobucket, there are technically 4 links: Email & IM, Direct, HTML, and IMG.  But the first two are really the same, so not sure why they have two there.  I usually use the IMG link for forum posts.

That's strange. I've only been able to get 'direct' to post out of that list.  Go figure.

195
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Brewer Bio: Chris in Colorado
« on: June 04, 2015, 07:37:06 AM »
Thanks everyone! I appreciate all of your help throughout the years. I will work on getting pics up. For some reason, I am having trouble with linking from Photobucket.

I use Photobucket.  Did you use the 'direct' link ? There are three links IIRC, and the 'direct' one is the one that posts correctly.

I have a feeling you might be on to something. When I click 'share' then 'get link' it just pops up without any other options. Every time it appears to produce a different link. I will keep poking...

I think if you double click on one of the uploaded pics to enlarge then you'll see the three different links. Then copy the 'direct' link and paste between the brackets. I'm pretty sure that's what I do.

Pages: 1 ... 11 12 [13] 14 15 ... 431