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Messages - HoosierBrew

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466
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 01, 2015, 04:35:08 PM »
Save $ for a keg system. Makes 5 gallons a whole lot more attractive.

467
Ingredients / Re: blood orange saison
« on: February 01, 2015, 03:36:03 PM »
ive been wanting to make a saison...share the recipe? it sounds delicious.

This is pretty basic, but good -  75% good pils, 20% Vienna, 5% Wheat. Mash @ 147F/ 90 minutes. Wyeast 3711, pitch @ 64 or 65F. 72hrs later slowly ramp up to 80F, leave until FG.  You can sub Munich or Rye for the Vienna, all are good.

468
Equipment and Software / Re: Brew house efficiency revisited
« on: February 01, 2015, 01:56:47 PM »
+1 to everything said.  The difference in getting 70 and 75% efficiency (or 75 and 80, etc.) is maybe a buck or two a batch.  In the scheme of things, irrelevant.  What is important is to dial in your system accurately - draining your mash tun dry with your preboil volume spot on, and hitting post boil volumes consistently. That will give you pretty steady efficiency and therefore the important thing - consistency. A 75% efficient beer doesn't inherently taste any worse than an 80% efficient beer. It's all about consistency.

469
Ingredients / Re: blood orange saison
« on: February 01, 2015, 12:49:28 PM »
that's why I'm asking. Unfortunately for me the Lindemans fruit bomb zone is the death zone for me [emoji14]

I agree, can't drink Lindemans either. I actually used to make fruit beers that were pretty balanced with the grist IMO, but they were too 'beery' for her. But she puts up with me being absorbed in this hobby, so I make her a fruit bomb a few times a year and all is good. Works for me.

470
I remember SNPA as the first hoppy beer I tried. Prior to that beer it was often dusty imports and Urquell was my favorite of the hoppy imports, but its freshness was spotty. But the first Sierra pale ale I tried was fresh and, though not hoppy by today's standards, the Cascade aroma jumped out of the glass and I was hooked. I'd never had a beer with what we know as American hop character before and, in the next few years, I probably bought enough Sierra and Anchor Liberty (and others) to float a ship.

Sam Adams was my first. And like any first love, it still holds a place in my heart. SNPA was probably the first American style hoppy beer, but it didn't appear around here until much later. Bass Ale was the beer that opened up my eyes and made me think that there was more to beer than BMC or, like you say, dusty imports.

We got SN beers first, then Sam not too long after. I have a soft spot for SA too. I still like Boston Lager. Drank a ton back then. I remember being excited when I found the freshest stuff (by their freshness dating) - they were the first (or among the first) to do that, at least in beers that showed up here back then.

471
Ingredients / Re: blood orange saison
« on: February 01, 2015, 12:33:36 PM »
I just read in Experimental Homebrewing  Drew's Saison Sangreal. He adds 3 liters of orange juice to the 5 gallons of beer after first fermentation. Has anyone actually tried this? Looks like an awful lot of juice...

Not with orange juice, but when I make fruit beers I add fruit puree to a secondary fermenter and rack the beer on top. Depending on the fruit I use I might use from 1 -3  48 oz cans of fruit purees - I make these for my wife and she prefers fruit beer in the Lindemann's 'fruit bomb' zone.

472
I remember SNPA as the first hoppy beer I tried. Prior to that beer it was often dusty imports and Urquell was my favorite of the hoppy imports, but its freshness was spotty. But the first Sierra pale ale I tried was fresh and, though not hoppy by today's standards, the Cascade aroma jumped out of the glass and I was hooked. I'd never had a beer with what we know as American hop character before and, in the next few years, I probably bought enough Sierra and Anchor Liberty (and others) to float a ship.

473
Ingredients / Re: 2014 Columbus hops
« on: January 31, 2015, 10:01:55 PM »
I sent them an e-mail and it probably was just a labeling mistake or something. I think I'm going to either give these away or pitch them like I did with the Summit hops I got a couple of years ago. I like onions and garlic in my food, but not in my beer.



I'm with you. Too many good varieties out there to use Summit!

474
Ingredients / Re: 2014 Columbus hops
« on: January 31, 2015, 09:36:11 PM »
Well I hope you didn't get the wrong one by accident. I agree, I've used a lot of Columbus and never had that issue with it. I've always had good luck with YVH.

475
Ingredients / Re: 2014 Columbus hops
« on: January 31, 2015, 08:47:40 PM »
Dan, I've used their 2014 Columbus pellets and not gotten any of that.  And I avoid Summit because of the onion /garlic thing.  I use a fair amount of Columbus but obviously I can only speak for what I've used. Did you blend it with any other hops, out of curiosity?

EDIT -  Mine are from YVH, too.

476
Ingredients / Re: Equinox Hops
« on: January 31, 2015, 05:59:12 PM »
I brewed a small batch APA recently to check out this new hop and I thought I'd pass on the final results. Equinox (HBC366) is the new release from the Hop Breeding Co.- the guys that produced Simcoe, Citra, And Mosaic, so they've been on a pretty hot streak in recent years. And this is another good one. Sierra (among others) is a big fan and used it in one of their single hop IPAs last year. 
   Equinox goes around 14-15% AA, and also has a very high oil content (2.9) -  it screams out IPA and dry hopping . In comparison, Citra is often listed at ~ 2 or or a little over. This is a complex hop - I get citrus, mango, earthiness, a touch of pine, and an overall resiny character (in a good way)from the high oil content. With its intensity it could drown out less intense hops easily unless you backed off on the Equinox. Except for trying out new hops, I rarely make single hop beers because I like to blend different hops for complexity. Thing is, this hop (sort of like Mosaic) has a lot going on and tastes like a blend of hops on its own. I get a little bit of Amarillo, Citra, and Simcoe together with a unique earthy/spicy character. Just bought a lb.

Lagunitas did their "born yesterday" w/ equinox and it was fantastic.... It will be on the "it list" in no time

Yeah, I think it's the new 'it' hop for IPAs definitely.  HBC are on their game. Great hop.

477
For those of us around before the craft beer revolution (not that I was  ;)) think about your own taste in beer. I know I was drinking Bud and feeling superior to the Lite drinkers back in the 70s and early 80s. But if someone came along and handed me a Pliney the Elder or a Heady Topper then, I probably would have made a face and spit it right out. But that's not how it happened. First, we found Bass Ale, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Sam Adams Boston Lager. Those beers changed our tastes gradually, prepared out palates for Anchor Steam and Harpoon IPA.

Fast forward to 2015 and it's the same thing now with our BMC friends, you wouldn't give them a pint of Russian Imperial Stout and expect them to love it. You give them a kolsch or a cream ale and bring them along slowly. If they're open minded and willing you entice them with an Irish Red or a Nut Brown ale. And you probably shouldn't ask them if they've been living under a rock for the past thirty years.  :P

Obviously, I agree with the author. If a beer drinker is adventurous, or at least has an open mind, their palates will change. But they might need 20 or 30 years of gradual change like those of us who were there at the beginning had. Maybe not that long, but, It'll take some time.

Totally agree.

478
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentation and light
« on: January 31, 2015, 02:00:31 PM »

I used to drink grolsch while over there. Sometimes it was ok. Sometimes not.


Yeah, I used to get so frustrated with those green bottles back then.  I'd get a pretty good Grolsch, then the next few would be skunky. I found one of the 5 liter mini kegs of it one day, actually dated pretty fresh given the shipping distance, and it was really, really good. I haven't had Grolsch in years - I've heard it has declined in recent years, but that fresh keg was tasty.

479
All Grain Brewing / Re: FG Variance
« on: January 31, 2015, 01:08:34 PM »
The AA for your recipe is 75%, which is low.  WLP001 is BRY 96.  BRY 96 is one of the highest attenuating normal ale strains.  Attenuation rates in the eighties are not uncommon with BRY 96.

As I have mentioned many times, a high krausen pitch will always outperform a "fermented out" pitch because the cells are in peak health and do not have to undo the morphological changes that occur at the end of fermentation.  Add in sufficient aeration and a strain with a high attenuation rate, and an AA of 85% is not out of the question.

Are you certain that your mash was not stratified (i.e., hot on the top and colder on the bottom or in the middle)?    A minute of stirring is often not enough to achieve an even temperature throughout the mash, especially if you had small dough balls.

Finally, as others have mentioned, one drinks beer, not numbers.  In time, you will know what to expect AA-wise from a yeast strain in your brew house using your water supply.  That knowledge will allow you to adjust your grist and mash profile to push AA in either direction.



+1.  75% for Chico is low. I stir the mash for close to 5 minutes, or as long as it takes to : 1/ ensure no doughballs, and  2/ get a steady temp end to end of the cooler, deep and shallow.  That's the great thing about a trial run on a beer you plan to brew again - more chances to fine tune it.
flbrewer - be extra careful to get a steady mash temp. Assuming you did that, you could always mash a few degrees warmer and maybe increase malts like crystal/caramel or carapils next time to get a higher FG, if you think it needs it. I still say it'll be good.

480
All Grain Brewing / Re: FG Variance
« on: January 31, 2015, 12:15:28 PM »
Ok, I'll stop wondering now and enjoy my awesome dry pale ale!

It may not be dry per se, but just a little thinner in body.  I bet it's good.

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