Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - HoosierBrew

Pages: 1 ... 50 51 [52] 53 54 ... 736
766
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 23, 2016, 11:52:15 AM »
I actually just checked that out on my lunch break! Pretty informative!

And I know the differences are minor. It's more of a desire to give it a try to see how I like it. I should prolly check out a local brew club to actually witness a 3 tier setup. Who knows. I may like it better than Biab. But I enjoyed Biab more than extract so far. At least for this one time I have done it. Not knocking on extract, I just felt like I was a little more in control of the process.

Start simple and work up to it.  That was my plan.  I figured I'd use that equipment for while then get a big fancy setup.  But I never found a reason to do that!  If you start with a setup like mine, you can start doing AG easily and inexpensively.  And nearly everything there can also be used for a bigger setup if you decide that's what you want to do.


Never found a reason to upgrade either. I love the simplicity and consistency of cooler mashing (and dennybrew.com, too).

767
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 23, 2016, 09:34:22 AM »
You should be able to get that down to 1 degree or less with enough gentle stirring.

Yep. I don't have trouble getting a uniform mash temp. I wonder about Visor's thermometer.

768
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 23, 2016, 09:33:19 AM »
FWIW as far as mash outs are concerned, I don't bother with trying to do one either. As Denny said, you can be up to a boil in the time it would take to do one, especially if you sparge hot. I use 185-190F sparge water which speeds up the process.

769
The Pub / Re: the perfect relationship
« on: August 23, 2016, 09:03:33 AM »
The raspberry lambic has been ruined by fruit flies


That was my question. Sorry to hear it - that's a lot of time invested for vinegar. Damn flies!

770
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 23, 2016, 07:40:58 AM »
I haven't really noticed any trouble with foam although I have to say that my mashout never quite hits 168 F, but only goes to about the low 160s, so I've probably been enjoying the benefits all along completely by accident!

It never ceases to amaze me just how much malt mixed with warm water then allowed to ferment loves to turn itself into the most perfect beer even without a whole lot of help from expert brewmasters.  :)


Yeah, no kidding. Malt wants to become beer !

771
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 23, 2016, 07:01:45 AM »
  no the mash out temp is around 168*, so these temps for foam are lower.   


Yep. The main purpose of a mash out is to denature the enzymes and 'lock in' the mash profile. So that would denature the alpha that contributes to the good foam.

772
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why no home brew TV shows?
« on: August 23, 2016, 05:31:45 AM »
If it were actually a good show, especially in the vein of Brewing TV, I'd tune in.

773
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 22, 2016, 05:59:50 PM »
The one difference I'm absolutely convinced of is the benefit of better foam from the alpha rest @ 160-162F. It's an easily noticeable difference IMO.

Interesting.  I haven't heard of that but might have to toy with it now based on your endorsement of it.

Sub 160 it's not as pronounced, but 160-162F for 45 mins and the foam has been thicker and more persistent than the single mashed lagers for me every time.


Edit - Though adding ~ 2.5% flaked barley does seem to approximate that in a single infused beer IMO.

774
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 22, 2016, 05:41:18 PM »
If someone were to do a longer rest at beta temps (like 60-90 min) then mash at alpha temps for like 30-40, it seems like you would get the best of both worlds right?


You just hit on the reason some brewers (especially lager brewers) like to step mash a beer - to have the best of both temp ranges. Alpha works best at 154-162°F, while beta works best between 131-150°F. So if I mash a helles for 45 minutes at 145F and 45 minutes at 160F, I've created a beer that will both attenuate well with a nice drinkability (from the beta rest), and also have some nice body and foam stability (from the alpha rest).


Jury's still out if you ask me.  More experiments are needed.  Personally I'd rather save the time and extra dorking around for something that we most likely can't probably taste the difference anyway, just split the difference, mash in the 150s for 45 or 90 minutes as you prefer, and call it good.

Another thing I wonder about.... if beta amylase doesn't all die right away at 154 F or so, doesn't it make more sense to do a reverse "step" mash (actually more of a "smooth" mash) starting at that point, not insulating, and allowing the temperature to fall to the mid 140s by the end of the mash?  Anyway, that's what I do almost all the time, without thinking too hard about it and without worrying, and with very good results IMHO.  Way less effort for probably very similar results.

But, you know, many people just can't help but play with their food.  Insulated mash tuns.... bah... humbug.  :D



I agree that the jury's out, too. I've been experimenting with step mashing (again) for about a year now. The one difference I'm absolutely convinced of is the benefit of better foam from the alpha rest @ 160-162F. It's an easily noticeable difference IMO. Flavor wise, I don't find a single infused lager to be inferior in any way (if mashed right).

775
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 22, 2016, 05:13:13 PM »
If someone were to do a longer rest at beta temps (like 60-90 min) then mash at alpha temps for like 30-40, it seems like you would get the best of both worlds right?


You just hit on the reason some brewers (especially lager brewers) like to step mash a beer - to have the best of both temp ranges. Alpha works best at 154-162°F, while beta works best between 131-150°F. So if I mash a helles for 45 minutes at 145F and 45 minutes at 160F, I've created a beer that will both attenuate well with a nice drinkability (from the beta rest), and also have some nice body and foam stability (from the alpha rest).


Edit - Step mashing is still fairly common in Belgium as well.

776
All Grain Brewing / Re: where did I go wrong
« on: August 22, 2016, 04:18:56 PM »
Got the ice cube trick from you and Denny here!  I make mine with distilled water so as not to offset the pH too much. Works great.


Nice. I make RO cubes. Same idea !

777
All Grain Brewing / Re: where did I go wrong
« on: August 22, 2016, 03:25:19 PM »
I usually err on a degree or two hotter than what specific mash temp I am shooting for.  It is always easier to cool down a mash with a couple ice cubes/gentle stirring vs heating up a "cooler"...


^^ No joke.

778
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Temps
« on: August 22, 2016, 02:36:30 PM »
I don't feel that a 151F mash is noticeably different than 150F, or that 155F is noticeably different than 156F, in terms of body or FG. But I do feel that in a given grist and using a given strain, a sub-150F mash is noticeably lighter in body and lower in FG, and that a mash above 156F gives a noticeably fuller body and higher FG. The middle range between 151F and 156F (given same grist and strain) has only very subtle differences in terms of body or FG IMO.

779
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all-grain, water concern
« on: August 21, 2016, 03:16:45 PM »
I've seen mineral water containing 400+ ppm bicarbonate, so all in all that's a bit scary when the information is not present...


Exactly. That was the reason I suggested RO water - at least it's a roughly known quantity. RO from machines is sub 50ppm TDS, often far under that. Denny is right that spring water offers a few more minerals which could be conducive, but there can be a ton of variance in spring water in terms of minerality IME. Still, for OP's first batch, spring or RO water would work nicely.

780
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all-grain, water concern
« on: August 21, 2016, 08:34:05 AM »
For now, using RO (reverse osmosis ) water from grocery store machines would be the best option as opposed to your unknown local water or water through a softener which is often too high in sodium for beer. I live in Indiana where the water is not good for brewing most beers to say the least. I use RO water along with Brunwater software which is excellent for helping you predict and control your pH, as well as using the right water profile for the right beer. But until you have time or inclination to get into water further, RO water is a good start. Good luck.

https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/


Edit -  A tsp of gypsum (from your homebrew shop)added to the kettle on your pale ale is a nice addition - it helps accentuate hop character.

Pages: 1 ... 50 51 [52] 53 54 ... 736