Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - repo

Pages: 1 ... 18 19 [20] 21 22
286
The Pub / Re: #58 - Not too shabby!
« on: January 27, 2012, 12:52:39 PM »
Not one brewery from Wasington state? ??? ??? WOW 

287
Equipment and Software / Re: Iodaphor vs. Star San
« on: January 27, 2012, 12:32:52 PM »
Yes thats why I put that in "quotes". If you smell and drink friom the bottle it will have odors and tastes. They mean when properly used your bottles, carboys etc. will not have a taste or odor from iodophor

ahh that makes sense then. I guess I either have been using it correctly or have no ability to taste idophor in beer. I usually mix it so there is a visible tint to the water but if it's iced tea it's iced green tea and weak at that.

Yeah  I don't think you've over done it. Color is so subjective and the stuff stains making it hard to tell when reusing that vessel. They should give us an SRM ;) to go by. I read that 2 capfuls is what they say fro 5 gallons to get the 12.5 ppm that sanitizes with 60 seconds contact time and no need to rinse.  Excessive contact time and too much iodophor added then requires a rinse, I think this is where people get into trouble, overdoing one or the other or both.

288
Equipment and Software / Re: Iodaphor vs. Star San
« on: January 27, 2012, 11:30:48 AM »
 
I use idophor with great success. I do keep it in a spray bottle for a while. The thing with idophor is the active ingredients will evaporate so if the spray bottle is not full it can lose some effectiveness over time so I open the spray bottle up and give it a sniff before using it. If it still smells more or less like a swimming pool I figure all is well. but as others have said it's pretty cheap. I buy a big bottle for ~20.00 and it lasts for a year or more. Also it is effected by light so an opaque bottle is a good idea. that being said, at a cap full for 5 gallons I generally mix up a batch in my fermenting bucket at the begining of the brew day and transfer it from vessel to vessel as I work ( I vessel as I verk). When I am in need of a small amount I will mix up ~1/5 of a cap full to a jug of water and use that to sanitize my wine thief for samples, airlocks etc.

I also understand that eventually you will breed some bugs that are partially resistant to whatever sanitizing product you use and you will then have to switch. **knock on wood** this has not happened to me yet.



Iodophor is "Odorless and Tasteless" It recomends a homebrew soplution of 1 tsp to 1 1/2 gallons. The bottle states that as long as sloution is amber color you have sufficient iodine present to sanatize. Make new solution daily or when color fades. Hard to do in opaque bottle. Chlorine is a big factor in its degradation. Light and air also take a toll. Big spender industries like dairy and hospitals use it.
Both are great no rinse sanitizers.

That is demonstrably ( ;D) not true. unless, perhaps they are implying that since the odor is associated with the degredation and therefor doesn't count. I have not tasted it but it for sure has an odor.
I think the problem with iodophor is most homebrewers mix it too strong and still think it is no rinse.  If that's you, I can taste it in your homebrew comp entries.

Yes thats why I put that in "quotes". If you smell and drink friom the bottle it will have odors and tastes. They mean when properly used your bottles, carboys etc. will not have a taste or odor from iodophor

289
Equipment and Software / Re: Iodaphor vs. Star San
« on: January 27, 2012, 11:11:07 AM »
 
I use idophor with great success. I do keep it in a spray bottle for a while. The thing with idophor is the active ingredients will evaporate so if the spray bottle is not full it can lose some effectiveness over time so I open the spray bottle up and give it a sniff before using it. If it still smells more or less like a swimming pool I figure all is well. but as others have said it's pretty cheap. I buy a big bottle for ~20.00 and it lasts for a year or more. Also it is effected by light so an opaque bottle is a good idea. that being said, at a cap full for 5 gallons I generally mix up a batch in my fermenting bucket at the begining of the brew day and transfer it from vessel to vessel as I work ( I vessel as I verk). When I am in need of a small amount I will mix up ~1/5 of a cap full to a jug of water and use that to sanitize my wine thief for samples, airlocks etc.

I also understand that eventually you will breed some bugs that are partially resistant to whatever sanitizing product you use and you will then have to switch. **knock on wood** this has not happened to me yet.



Iodophor is "Odorless and Tasteless" It recomends a homebrew soplution of 1 tsp to 1 1/2 gallons. The bottle states that as long as sloution is amber color you have sufficient iodine present to sanatize. Make new solution daily or when color fades. Hard to do in opaque bottle. Chlorine is a big factor in its degradation. Light and air also take a toll. Big spender industries like dairy and hospitals use it.
Both are great no rinse sanitizers.

290
All Grain Brewing / Re: Efficiency: How Good is Too Good
« on: January 25, 2012, 10:31:08 AM »
[  </pontification>
to brewing I think you're on even shakier ground there. There's an old adage about not reinventing the wheel that I think may apply. In the ten thousand years we've been brewing we've learned a thing or two. 'Brewers' tales and rules of thumb' survive because they are valuable; they don't if they're not. Like evolution. Why on earth would you tell new brewers to 'throw them out the window?' What are you, a book burner?

And it's not just the methodology of brewing that's been formed by evolution. Our beer styles have come down to us through the ages. 10,000 years of development and tweaking, 10,000 years of test marketing. 10,000 years of learning what we like and what we don't. The styles aren't rules and regulations, they're valuable data about what works for us. There's have been a lot of changes in home brewing since I started 25 years ago, and most of them have been great. But two I consider unfortunate have been 1) the move toward ever faster brews (shorter mashes, batch sparging, etc.) and 2) the seeming disregard and often downright disdain for brewing lore. It seems somehow a uniquely American arrogance--10,000 years of testing, tweaking, refining? Screw that--I LIKE 100 IBU beer! Style guidelines? Fascism!
Now I'll get off my soapbox.
[/quote]



Wow I don't think I could disagree with you more. 10,000- year old recipes?? Hops have only beeen documented  back to 11th century. The german purity law had no respect for yeast. When I was in school Pluto was a planet, we did the pledge of allegiance and stretching before excercise was the rule of thumb. Science has brought us evolution and science has helped us to understand how to make better beer and proven many old rules of thumb to be ridiculous.

291
All Grain Brewing / Re: HELP! OG way too high
« on: January 21, 2012, 10:57:24 AM »
I don't think it's possible that you have 8 gallons collected at 1.074 from 14 pounds of grain. Not knowing the exact grain bill this does seem to exceed 100% efficiency. I would double check your numbers.

292
Beer Recipes / Re: IIPA recipe / how's it look?
« on: January 21, 2012, 07:58:26 AM »
Ok, you wanna brew what you wanna drink. I think your recipe would fit that bill, an east coast imperial ipa is how I'd describe it. Malty and alcoholy with some hops. And it seems to coincide with your fav commercial beers (except for the Pliny).  Carapils is a body malt so it goes well when looking for some body. Which in this case I think that you are.

293
Your kit is designed so that you are getting color and flavor from the grains, thats why its having you steep them. You will get a minute amount of sugar from the specialty grains, but what the recipe is after is the color and flavor.  It is trying to keep things simple while still creating decent beer. 

If your water tastes metallic then yes use something else.

294
You will want to keep the grains above 150 and under 170, so yes you will need to keep the stove on enough to keep it warm. It should be steeped for 30 minutes.  Use about 3/4 gallons of water per pound of grain for best results.

You can absolutely dry hop in primary, in fact many will say thats the only sane way to do it. You must wait till fermentation is almost complete. The 7 days should be fine. The hops will sink very slowly over the two weeks.

Yes be prepared and have a blowoff available.

295
Beer Recipes / Re: IIPA recipe / how's it look?
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:43:46 PM »
Hops, yes I use more than that in a 5.5 gallon batch. By alright I meant it fit the "style" guidelines.

296
The Pub / Re: Hey Denny
« on: January 20, 2012, 09:39:58 AM »
Another delicious "CONNcoction"

297
The Pub / Re: What's the Weather Like Where You Are?
« on: January 19, 2012, 07:59:15 PM »
Its lightly snowing  :-\

298
Beer Recipes / Re: IIPA recipe / how's it look?
« on: January 19, 2012, 07:34:32 PM »
Looks alright.  What are your 5 favorite commercial examples? I think that info would help people give better advice.

299
Citra is much better served in aroma and flavoring additions IMO especially given its cost and availability. With your current recipe though it'll be well into IPA ibu's, not knowing the AA's you've got it could get into double IPA range.

How about this:
1oz  Citra 60 mins  avg AA 13.2
1oz  Cascade 45 mins  avg AA 7.1
1oz  Ahtanum 28 mins  avg AA 4.5
1oz Citra 15 mins avg AA 13.2
1oz Cascade 5 mins  avg AA 7.1

I don't have the hops yet ...they are in the mail.




Do you have /are you getting any bittering hops . Those three are all considered aroma hops. You can use them as you wish of course.  I would save at least a 1/2 ounce each of the citra and cascade for dry hopping. But you gotta make what you want to drink ;)

300
Citra is much better served in aroma and flavoring additions IMO especially given its cost and availability. With your current recipe though it'll be well into IPA ibu's, not knowing the AA's you've got it could get into double IPA range.

Pages: 1 ... 18 19 [20] 21 22