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Messages - goschman

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1
Beer Recipes / Re: Brown Ale Recipe review
« on: Today at 06:10:53 AM »
I recall one brown ale that notably uses roasted barley and no chocolate malt that I really like. I believe it is Moose Drool by Big Sky which is probably not widely distributed.

I too like to use higher amounts of flaked grains to get the effect I desire. I think it will help to smooth out the roasted character.

EDIT- All the moose drool clone recipes I see have chocolate malt so I must be thinking of a different beer...

2
Beer Recipes / Re: American Wheat
« on: Today at 06:09:38 AM »
Can't really go wrong with that but I would save the amarillo for later additions and use something like Magnum for bittering. My american wheat uses cascade, amarillo, and willamette for later additions along with orange zest and some coriander. 

I find myself drinking a lot of wheat beers in the summer. I like to brew really light bodied, light colored, clean wheats but find a lot of the commercial examples to have a bit more body and yeast character than I prefer.

3
Equipment and Software / Re: 36 qt. kettle deal
« on: Today at 06:05:45 AM »
I thought this was a pretty good deal. My old aluminum 30 qt got a pinhole in the bottom somehow so it was time to find a replacement. I am glad I could find something that is stainless in my price range. It seems to be about $20 cheaper than anywhere else.

http://www.wayfair.com/Bayou-Classic-Stock-Pot-with-Lid-10-xx-BAY1032.html#

Would it be difficult to mod this to accommodate a spigot in the future? I think if I took my time and used a uni-bit it wouldn't be too bad...
Wait!...your subject says 36 qt. but the link is for an 82 qt. pot.  You want a 20 gallon pot?

When I click the link, it takes me to a default 'select size' option. I purchased the 36 qt pot

4
Beer Recipes / Re: Brown Ale Recipe review
« on: May 26, 2015, 12:31:39 PM »
That's cool that you had a good experience with the chestnuts. If it has worked well the way you have it then you may not need to change a thing. My initial thought would be to crush them and add them to the mash but that is not really based on anything but intuition.

I think the base recipe looks great and I have been wanting to do something similar for quite some time. When I finally get around to a brown, I think it will be munich dunkel inspired mut of a beer.

5
Equipment and Software / Re: 36 qt. kettle deal
« on: May 26, 2015, 10:30:26 AM »
Good find. I don't have any issues with aluminum but would prefer stainless. Looks like with the 32 qt pot and the lid it would be about the same price.

6
Beer Recipes / Re: Brown Ale Recipe review
« on: May 26, 2015, 09:47:28 AM »
I think that looks very good.

I would investigate adding the chestnuts in the mash or at another time during the process. Also, considering adding the nibs into the fermenter after activity has slowed. I have not used either ingredient but those are the only things that seems to stick out to me.

7
Equipment and Software / 36 qt. kettle deal
« on: May 26, 2015, 09:43:09 AM »
I thought this was a pretty good deal. My old aluminum 30 qt got a pinhole in the bottom somehow so it was time to find a replacement. I am glad I could find something that is stainless in my price range. It seems to be about $20 cheaper than anywhere else.

http://www.wayfair.com/Bayou-Classic-Stock-Pot-with-Lid-10-xx-BAY1032.html#

Would it be difficult to mod this to accommodate a spigot in the future? I think if I took my time and used a uni-bit it wouldn't be too bad...


8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Gelatin not working?
« on: May 22, 2015, 01:16:36 PM »
I don't think you need to stir anything.  I have been adding hot gelatin mixture onto cold beer without stirring for years with overnight results.  I figure as the gelatin temperature reaches equilibrium it sinks to the bottom because it is more dense and takes all the haze with it. 
I agree with dmtaylor on this.  Maybe you haven't picked it up because your dip tube is off the bottom of the keg.

This is my process as well. For some reason I have been getting mixed results lately. Some beers clear very fast while others will take 1-2 weeks so at that point I feel that I didn't follow the correct process or something. My current lager cleared extremely fast but that is probably also due to the nature of very flocculant lager yeast.

9
Beer Recipes / Re: help me classify this beer
« on: May 22, 2015, 06:52:45 AM »
Okay thanks. I totally knew you were kidding so don't worry. I wasn't sure when the new guidelines would be adopted so I may be jumping the gun there. For now it will just have to remain 'GoschaLagerBier'...

10
Beer Recipes / Re: help me classify this beer
« on: May 22, 2015, 06:34:42 AM »
Put it in green bottles and let it sit on a shelf for 4-5 months.  Then it will taste like a Premium Lager.  :)

Not a bad idea...haha. The comps I am considering entering are in August so it might work well. Should I leave them in a warm, sunny room?

11
Beer Recipes / Re: help me classify this beer
« on: May 22, 2015, 06:24:46 AM »
I hadn't considered international pale lager. That may be the ticket.

I tasted again last night and it is damn tasty whatever it is. It has a smooth character that I haven't really experienced in my beers. It is only my second lager so maybe that is the difference.

Pours a brilliant yellow with a thin lasting white head and good carbonation streaming up the glass. The aroma is of sweet malt and a light hop aroma. If it wasn't my beer, I wouldn't think this was dry hopped. There is a pretty soft malt character with an almost creamy smooth mouthfeel. It is not as crisp nor as dry as I would expect for finishing at 1.009. The hops provide good balance with some slight lemon, herbal, and spicy characters that do not overpower the beer but add an interesting note. I can see why these are sometimes used as subs for traditional noble hops. The beer finishes extremely clean with no noticeable aftertastes or off-flavors.

I am still probably making judgments a bit too early. I wish I was more familiar with these categories so I could know where to place it. It does not taste like any of the commercial examples provided for American Lager so I think I can rule that out. It seems like it is almost seems to be in between international pale lager and dortmunder. I will need to track down some examples for comparison I suppose.

Not sure if it helps but here are the hop amounts:

14 g Sterling (~9% AA) FWH
10 g Sterling / 20 g Crystal 5 min
10 g Sterling / 20 g Crystal DH

I forgot to check but I think the OG was 1.047 and the FG 1.009

Yellow balanced profile in Bru'n Water

12
Ingredients / Re: fruit puree into primary
« on: May 21, 2015, 02:59:15 PM »
You may end up with some that sinks and some that floats. If you drain from the spigot it most likely will just plug up. Or the sunk fruit matter will slowly flow out with the beer and you end up with all of it in the bottle/keg. With this beer I'd really concider using a siphon so you can pin point where you are racking from (below the floaters but above the sinkers)

Got ya thanks for the advice. I planned to ferment this guy in a bucket like last attempt but forgot. It was a piece of cake with the paint strainer back clamped down by the bucket lid. I just lifted the bag out to remove most of the fruit chunks and hops...

13
Ingredients / Re: fruit puree into primary
« on: May 21, 2015, 12:18:39 PM »
A healthy 48 hr cold crash with your primary fermenter will definitely help to settle out the majority of the fruit (puree) to the bottom.  Then it is up to you to rack carefully to avoid any fruit.

Since I have a speidel I transfer from the spigot at the bottom. With yeast, dry hops, and fruit puree I will likely need to just dump a bunch of sludge until I am getting beer.

14
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Busch Copper Lager
« on: May 21, 2015, 08:52:30 AM »
As Paul Gatza has stated to his BA members: The biggest challenge facing the craft industry is poor quality beers.

There are a lot of crap craft beers out there. Finding that diamond in the rough is great, but you sure have to down a lot of coal dust to get there.

As you will notice with many of the European beers that we hold dear, they only make a few beer styles or maybe one, but they focus on honing and refining that limited slate to high quality. We need more of that focus here in the craft beer industry too.

Good point. I would say that 4/5 new breweries opening in my region are below average quality in my opinion.

15
Beer Recipes / Re: help me classify this beer
« on: May 21, 2015, 07:34:53 AM »
There were so many different lager styles that I wanted to brew that I just ended up making a mut. I will take a look at the guidelines for Dortmunder and see if I can find a commercial example around. Is the new style called 'German Helles Exportbier"?

EDIT: Yes, that is the new name apparently and after reviewing it that does seem the most accurate at this point. Thanks for your help.

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