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Messages - goschman

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1
Ingredients / Re: hop balance for 'kolsch' style
« on: Today at 06:59:54 AM »
With Amarillo you are brewing a pale ale, not a kolsch.

And by pale ale, he means blonde. lol  But yeah, this is more a blonde (you're on the low side IBU-wise for an APA).  For a kolsch, I really like all Spalt.  I assume a mostly Pils grain bill with maybe a little Vienna or Munich?

Yep. Mostly pils with a bit of vienna and wheat. I normally use WLP029 but gonna give WY2565 a go for the first time. Any advice on ferm temps? I like a bit of fruitiness so I am thinking a bit above 60F.

2
Ingredients / Re: hop balance for 'kolsch' style
« on: Today at 06:40:46 AM »
I think, in terms of style, it would come off as a kolsch/pale ale hybrid. Not that that's a bad thing at all. I know your IBUs are low, but Amarillo just has that American ale flavor and aroma. If you're not gonna comp with it, it doesn't matter.

Thanks Hoosier. I would think it would be closer to a blonde than a pale but I understand the point. I should just leave kolsch out of it and ask for advice regarding this 'ale'. Any input on the hop schedule to meet my goals? Getting the hops right is always the hardest part of recipes for me.

I am thinking about changing it to:
12 IBUs Spalt FWH
14 g Spalt 20 min
28 g Amarillo 5 min

Ballast Point has a beer which is designated as a 'pale ale'. I was always disappointed in it assuming it was supposed to be an APA. Years later, I discovered it is actually a kolsch which explains my confusion. If I called this beer a pale ale, my friends would be extremely disappointed..haha


3
Ingredients / Re: hop balance for 'kolsch' style
« on: Today at 06:15:39 AM »
With Amarillo you are brewing a pale ale, not a kolsch.

Ok thanks. Didn't think a 20 IBU beer would be considered a pale. Good to know.

4
Ingredients / hop balance for 'kolsch' style
« on: August 27, 2015, 08:57:30 AM »
I am getting ready for my 4th attempt at a kolsch and have been working to get the hop character right for what I want. My first attempt was bittered with a small amount of magnum and then amarillo for flavor and aroma. My last attempt was tettnang at FWH and that is it. Basically I did an Americanized version first and a more traditional version last. Now, I want to find a balance between both ideas.

For this attempt I will be using Spalt and Amarillo. My thought is to use Spalt for FWH then do a mixture of Amarillo/Spalt at 20 and 5 min remaining for a total of 20-25 IBUs. Any advice on usage ratio between the two varieties? I was thinking double the amount of spalt but don't want the amarillo to be underwhelming. I am not trying to do an APA with kolsch yeast but I do want the amarillo to be noticeable.

This is my current hop schedule idea:
~12 IBU Spalt FWH
14 g Amarillo 20
10 g Amarillo 5
20 g Spalt 5

20-25 IBUs total

EDIT: I realize my terminology may confuse people. I suppose we could call it a blonde if that is more appropriate.

5
Beer Recipes / Re: Alaskan Amber Steam?
« on: August 26, 2015, 02:59:23 PM »
I usually get around 80% attenuation with WLP029 but normally mash pretty low as well. I am going to do my next kolsch with 2565 for the first time then reuse the yeast for an 'alt' type beer (I know this yeast is not used for alts). I am very excited to see which strain I prefer.

Sorry to go off topic...

(Ditto about off topic, sorry.)  When you do try the 2565, keep in mind that it needs extra time to finish.  Give it a good month, maybe even 5 weeks, to finish attenuating and settling out.  Might also want to add gelatin as it takes forever to settle.  But it tastes great, superior to WLP029 IMHO.

Thanks for the advice. I will keep that in mind for sure. Hoping to brew that next.

6
Beer Recipes / Re: Alaskan Amber Steam?
« on: August 26, 2015, 02:13:38 PM »
I used the other Kolsch yeast 2565 on my last two IPAs and kind of like it, although it's almost too dry.  WLP029 might not turn out quite so dry.  'Course I did mash pretty low, I think 151-152 F, but only for 40 minutes.  Attenuation was over 80%.

I usually get around 80% attenuation with WLP029 but normally mash pretty low as well. I am going to do my next kolsch with 2565 for the first time then reuse the yeast for an 'alt' type beer (I know this yeast is not used for alts). I am very excited to see which strain I prefer.

Sorry to go off topic...

7
Beer Recipes / Re: Alaskan Amber Steam?
« on: August 26, 2015, 02:01:22 PM »
I would classify it more in the APA/IPA realm as well. I used WLP029 in a wheat IPA once and loved it. It seem that if you ferment it within their recommended range you get a bit more a fruity/grape character which I like. 58-60F seems very clean and more lager like.

8
Beer Recipes / Re: Alaskan Amber Steam?
« on: August 26, 2015, 01:33:19 PM »
Be careful with the el dorado. In my opinion they can be extremely sweet if not balanced by other hops. It sounds strange but others have experienced that as well...

9
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Things you wish breweries would figure out
« on: August 25, 2015, 01:55:08 PM »
Learn how to brew on larger systems before opening your brewery. Seems that homebrewers are continuing to make the jump without any experience on large systems.

I cannot tell you how many brand new breweries that I have been to that are horrible. After a few months, most (not all) seem to improve; some dramatically. One just opened nearby last weekend; not good. Luckily for them craft beer is so popular right now that half the people don't realize that they are drinking crappy beer. Most businesses would suffer from a bad product but a lot of new breweries are lucky that way...

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: residual CO2 and bottling
« on: August 25, 2015, 08:36:45 AM »
Its a high ABV baltic porter that finished pretty low. I may carb it a bit less than normal to reduce a bit of the bite that I am afraid it will have.

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: residual CO2 and bottling
« on: August 25, 2015, 06:27:25 AM »
I would think it depends on how active co2 production was at those various temps. If fermentation was basically done at 70° and you then lowered the temp, I'd go with that. The difference in the amount of priming sugar needed isn't so much that I would worry about bottle bombs.

Thanks. Normally, I wouldn't worry but this is a smaller batch with less room for error. You are correct in the difference in priming sugar isn't huge so hopefully it won't matter too much.

12
Kegging and Bottling / residual CO2 and bottling
« on: August 25, 2015, 06:13:15 AM »
beer fermented at 63F for a few days then free rose to 70F over a couple of days and stayed there for a couple of weeks. I currently have the beer in an ice bath but it is not getting below 55F and is usually closer to 60F.

What temp should enter for residual CO2 calculations? I don't bottle very often and in the past, I tried to keep my temps pretty constant.

13
Had one Saturday that was spiced low and had a lot of pumpkin flavor. Not sure of the brewery's process.

I have brewed one that had an amber base and had noticeable pumpkin flavor however most of mine which are usually darker have not had much detectable flavor.

14
This year I am considering roasting it in the oven as usual but possibly freezing it then thawing and adding it to the fermenter when ready. I normally add it in the mash which gets me a couple of gravity points, very little flavor, and a smoother mouthfeel.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: hot, young beer
« on: August 20, 2015, 10:59:46 AM »
Thanks for reaffirming. That's why I tried to preface it with "this is one of those posts that I already know the answer to; wait and see".

I thought maybe someone would have some tips on aging higher OG beers or possibly recommendations on carbonation to reduce 'bite'...

I have read several papers that talk about fusels aging into esters, but none of them ever gave guidelines or a time frame.

Ok great. Man I think I will just have to make some premature judgements so that I will have time brew the final batch and let it age long enough. 

Thanks all, I will try to remember and update to let ya know how it turns out. For next batch, I will remove the brown sugar which I used to bump up my OG after getting low efficiency. I am also thinking about switching out the dark munich (9L) which is at about 33% for light munich (6L).

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