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Messages - gman23

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1
Beer Recipes / Re: Lager beer recipe recomendations
« on: January 16, 2019, 11:03:08 PM »
I really enjoyed this Dark Czech Lager. It is based on a recipe from another homebrewer Paulaner which is based on Pivovar Kout na Šumavě Koutský tmavý speciál 14°.

I used

77% Pils
10% Munich
10% Caramunich II
3% Carafa II

22 IBU Saaz at 60 min
13 IBU Saaz at 30 min

Bohemian Lager Yeast (I had to sub my preferred yeast to S-189 because my Homebrew shop was out of Bohemian Lager Yeast. Paulaner used 2278.)


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How bad would a bavarian lager yeast be in this? I may give this a shot soon.

2
Beer Recipes / Re: Lager beer recipe recomendations
« on: January 16, 2019, 03:43:14 PM »
So are you saying that you're used to hoppy beers but you want to brew a malty beer?

I'm not sure you would want to tackle a Doppelbock for your first lager but at the same time; why not? Another good option would be a dunkel lager.

As Keller mentioned, when I do bigger maltier beers I like to push the IBUs up to or above the upper limits of the range out of personal preference.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Formulating a RIS
« on: January 11, 2019, 07:45:28 PM »
I would appreciate some input/opinions on this RIS recipe I'm formulating.

Here goes:  Pale Malt 74.6%
                  Flaked Barley 9.8%
                  Roasted Barley (300 SRM) 3%
                  C-120 2.2%
                  Chocolate Malt (340 SRM) 2.2%
                  Brown Malt (65 SRM) 1.9%
                  Sugar,Table 3.7%
                  Candi Syrup, D-180 2.5%


After a similar post for a recent Imperial Porter I did, I agree on the notes about simplicity as well.

I agree on Special B for the dark stone fruit you are going for but 120 will do some of that as well.

I would say that Brown malt is a great malt but probably won't do much at that percentage. I would either up it considerably or remove it completely.


4
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 10:50:26 PM »
Are you using flaked oats or other flaked adjuncts?  I've noticed my efficiency to drop inconsistently when using flaked oats enough so that the next time I use 'em I will probably boil them before adding to the mash. I've tried grinding them without success.

Another thought: are you getting dough balls?  I'm guessing not, but doesn;t hurt to ask.

Another issue seems to be that you don't always have a good estimate of mash efficiency.  In my signature line, is a link to an efficiency calculator that I tweaked for estimating efficiency of batch sparging.

Flaked grains sometimes. I have the extract potential set super low in Beersmith as I notice a dip as well. Some software has the the extract potential for flaked set to the same as base grain which has not been my experience. 

No dough balls. I make sure to stir well and destroy any at mash in.

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 04:59:14 PM »
You guys probably have something with grain crush consistency. I'm brewing this weekend and will try to add pictures. Time to save up for a better grain mill...
Well when you're ready I have an unequivocal endorsement I can make.  :)

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Hey I'll take it now and file it away!!

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 04:29:49 PM »
You guys probably have something with grain crush consistency. I'm brewing this weekend and will try to add pictures. Time to save up for a better grain mill...

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 04:06:04 PM »
Maybe I'm blowing it a bit out of proportion.

Here's the bh efficiency from some of my most recent batches:
67.3% (last time I brewed this it was 73.6% when milled twice)
65.8% (expectedly low due to bigger grain bill)
72.6%
70.5%
69.3% (last time I brewed this it was 73.6%)
68.4% (last time I brewed this it was 66.3%)
70.4%
65.7%

Over about 100 batches I average 71.1% brewhouse and 74.3% mash efficiency which isn't horrible. I'm obviously more concerned about the inconsistency that is anywhere from 65%-79% for average OG beers. It makes designing a new recipe a nightmare. I basically have to use my average efficiency and keep my fingers crossed...





8
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 03:24:09 PM »
Still don't understand why you remill.  But that may be a red herring.

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Fair enough. I won't try to explain it.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 03:22:29 PM »
Once its milled, it is taking up atmospheric moisture however carefully you store it.  This could lead to significant inconsistency.   Milling immediately prior to brewing is much preferred.   If you don't care to mill at home but want to buy by the sack, will the shop let you take it back there batch by batch to use their mill?

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I remill at home within a couple of days at most. When I purchase full bags of malt it is unmilled and it gets milled per batch. I take the bag back to mill there since I am usually purchasing specialty malts. I have always read advice about running through the mill twice which is basically what I'm doing...

10
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 03:09:15 PM »
Okay, step back and rethink.  Gman23, I gather you buy your grain at the LHBS on a batch by batch basis, rather than by the sack to use over time?  Is it possible that their storage conditions lead to inconsistencies in freshness and quality from batch to batch?  Or something between your first crush and second?  Maybe consistency is to be found in (what I do for convenience even though my LHBS is impeccable) buying whole sacks of base malt (from somebody else?) and milling fresh at home at brew time.  Exercise full control.   Just grasping at straws here maybe, but....

(Realize I don't understand why you mill both at the shop and at home, if you have the ability to do it yourself.)

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When I have the funds, I normally purchase bags of weyermann pilsner which is my main base malt. I have them mill it first just because it can't hurt and my milling process at home is kind of time consuming. Having it already crushed speeds up the second go round.

11
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 03:04:52 PM »
Thanks all. I just wanted to make sure there wasn't anything glaring with my process.

I have always been leery of mills at brew stores which is why I remill tighter at home. Honestly, I have an old corona mill with a drill attachment so I have no idea what the measurement of it is actually is. I do know that I don't touch it so the crush should be consistent though...

I have been wanting to get a proper mill for some time but brew on a very tight budget. I have been brewing for about 10 years now and is just something I have come to accept but is really frustrating at the same time. I will continue to examine my processes and look further into my crush. 

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 03:02:15 AM »
Hmm.  Well, base malts do give a higher yield than specialty malts.  But if you're using software that should already be figured into your expectations.

At least 10-15 minutes at 170°F is a good target for mash off.  Of course in your system (I use direct heat) the infusion will eat into either your ability to thin the main mash or your second runoff.  But worth a try to see of there's a payoff in the balance.

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My sparge water is calculated to bring the grain bed up to 170f however I have seen little difference in letting it rest or stirring well and collecting wort immediately.

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 02:45:48 AM »
One more thought.  Do you/can you include a mash off step?  I know some are skeptical, but I find it really makes a difference.  Squeezes out little more yield.  May help diffuse extract.  Mechanism debatable,  effect real, IME.  If you already do this... well damn, then.

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I never had but I could probably figure out a double infusion/step. What temps and lengths would you recommend?

One other note my paler grists with fewer specialty malts seem to get higher efficiency. One of my beers is 100% pilsner malt and gets me near 77% Brewhouse. Does that point to a conversion issue?

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 01:51:23 AM »
Not sure if it matters but water to grain is usually above 1.5

15
All Grain Brewing / Re: another efficiency woes thread
« on: January 09, 2019, 01:45:24 AM »



If your crush is so fine that you’re making flour from the grain I have to disagree with others who say tighter is better and instead say open the gap until you get cracked grain “nuggets” with no ‘old maids’ (uncracked kernels). This allows permeability of the grain bed.

If Denny is the batch sparge guru, BrewBama is the permeability guru!  :)

I'm thinking that since the problem seemingly starts with conversion efficiency, there is something  to this.   If the bed is too compacted or the grist too fine, the lack of permeability means enzymes don't get full access to the starch, and sugar can't be diffused out into the liquor -- and the concentration of sugar that is there within the dough inhibits further enzyme activity.  I would try a coarser crush as BrewBama described, and frequent stirring during conversion (you didn't mention whether you stir the mash at all.)  See if this aids mash efficiency.   Lauter efficiency then will be what it is with a batch sparge.

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I stir the mash well about every 15 minutes. An unchanged recipe and process yielded a 6 point efficiency difference on two different occasions. The higher efficiency batch was re milled at home.

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