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Messages - goschman

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121
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA malt bill advice
« on: February 10, 2014, 09:20:04 AM »
I have had good success with:
75% Two row
20% Munich
5% crystal 40/60

122
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 05:53:45 PM »
Hard to say without tasting, but some people mistake munich's melanoidins as diacetyl

True. If I hadn't have made a 100% munich beer then I probably wouldn't be sure. This 20% munich beer definitely has a butterscotch quality that wasn't in the 100% munich beer.

123
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cold Keg
« on: February 07, 2014, 05:19:22 PM »
I was afraid my kegs were going to freeze in the garage fridge with this cold snap that hit CO. I never took the temp in my garage but it would be safe to say it dropped below freezing with the negative temps outside. Luckily it warmed up to 40F today and I think I am in the clear for the next few days.

124
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 04:12:41 PM »
70% two row
20% light munich
5% flaked oats
5% crystal 40

Mashed at 158 for 75 minutes

Hops:
Magnum 60 min
Amarillo 10 min
Cascade/Citra 0 min

S-04
OG 1.047
FG 1.016
IBUs ~25

this beer is my session beer so it is around 4% ABV. The first version I did of this beer was well balanced but not malty per se. The second batch was infected but I drank it because it tasted like a Belgian...haha.

This one does have some more sweetness due to a higher FG but the butterscotch/toffee character seems out of place. The aroma completely overtakes the cascade/citra flavor and aroma which was quite nice on the first batch.

125
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 12:24:31 PM »
If you get repeated infection issues, then you should check your sanitizer or routine and finally consider new plastics for whatever touched that batch.  Some bacteria is really persistent.  You can keep the infected plastic stuff for use on sours, perhaps.

Well the last batch that was infected was about 6 months ago. I normally don't run into many infection issues.

126
Ingredients / Re: El Dorado Hops
« on: February 07, 2014, 11:10:28 AM »
An old new belgium seasonal featured El Dorado hops. I remember really liking Red Hoptober and it appears to have been dry hopped with El Dorado and Centennial. As bluesman said, I think it could be great if you use it in combination with the right hops.

127
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 10:57:29 AM »
Thanks guys! I was under the impression that it would not go away even it was fermentation related.

I used S-04 between 62F - 66F. The last beer I did under similar circumstances ended up super clean which makes me a bit worried about infection. The last time I brewed this particular beer it got some strange infection that made it taste "belgianesque". If this batch ends up infected, I think it is time to move on from the bad mojo...

128
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 10:28:30 AM »
It kinda depends on the cause of the diacetyl.  If it's from an infection there's not much you can do.  If it's due to incomplete fermentation, you could try krausening.  I doubt simply warming up the keg and counting on the retained yeast will do much.
Agreed.

You didn't back up beer into your lines recently did you? I had an issue where I did that and there was mold in one of my disconnects and lines that was causing hoppy beers to turn butterscotchy. Finally over that mess. Check your co2 lines and disconnects to be sure.

Cleaned my lines while I kegged this batch. I noticed the caramelly, butterscotch notes when I took a hydrometer sample when kegging.

129
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 09:45:03 AM »
It kinda depends on the cause of the diacetyl.  If it's from an infection there's not much you can do.  If it's due to incomplete fermentation, you could try krausening.  I doubt simply warming up the keg and counting on the retained yeast will do much.

I think it is incomplete fermentation. I don't think that it is not an infection but I guess it is too early to tell for sure.

I kind of rushed this batch for no particular reason but didn't take the steps to ensure it was done. It fermented quickly and the yeast dropped out fast. It finished 4 points higher than expected but I am told this may be due to a proper mash out that I don't normally do...

130
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 09:27:39 AM »
Thanks guys. The only reason I was going to degas was just in case it fermented any more in the keg. I transferred this one too quickly which I think might explain the diacetyl and a higher than expected FG.

131
General Homebrew Discussion / fixing diacetyl in keg?
« on: February 07, 2014, 09:04:23 AM »
I realize this has been posted about a lot so sorry about that. I searched around a bit but thought I would just start a new post.

My last batch has been on carb in the keg at 40F for a week. I had a sample last night and it appears to have diacetyl which is a first for me. I noticed it when kegging but didn't realize since I have not had any experience with it. It is coming through more in the aroma than the taste and is more butterscotch than popcorn. It isn't horrible but too much for what I was going for. It covers up the delicate hop profile I was shooting for which is really bugging me...

My plan is to the degass the keg, stir any settled yeast back into suspension, and bring up to 70F for a few days. Is this a good idea? At this point it can't really hurt anything but I also am not sure if it is worth it and I don't want to get my hopes up.

132
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 12:30:26 PM »
Good advice. I had a brewing schedule set that I would hate to break but it would probably be best to do so. I was normally letting my batches primary for 21 days but somehow got out of that habit...not sure why.

133
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 11:52:30 AM »

Could this change the fermentability of the wort?

Possibly. From what I understand, larger sugars can continue to get broken down into simpler sugars if you do not hit that 168-170 temp.

That is good to know. I normally get higher than average attenuation possibly due to low sparge temps. This procedural change could drastically impact the results I have been getting. I prefer drier beers so would like higher attenuation in most cases.

Yup, and it might actually cause the result you saw. still seems like an extreme reaction but it's a good trick to know if you can reproduce it. love me some big malty session beer.

This beer is much more malty than I expected and has an interesting butterscotch quality. Considering I only used 20% munich it seems to cut through more than I am accustomed to. Also, S04 has been giving me very clean beers of late. This one definitely seems to have more of an English feel. Balanced with the citrusy American hops will make this pretty interesting.

ooh butterscotch huh? is it diacetyl do you think? is it possible you way over pitched this? that can cause a really vigorous early fermentation followed by a premature flocculation (excellent homebrew related band name by the way "Premature Flocculation")

Good point. I am not sure. I only used one 11 g packet for a 5 gallon batch so I don't think I overpitched. The other thing I was going to do was warm it up for a couple of days but obviosly didn't do that. Damn...I am off my game.

134
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 11:16:33 AM »

Could this change the fermentability of the wort?

Possibly. From what I understand, larger sugars can continue to get broken down into simpler sugars if you do not hit that 168-170 temp.

That is good to know. I normally get higher than average attenuation possibly due to low sparge temps. This procedural change could drastically impact the results I have been getting. I prefer drier beers so would like higher attenuation in most cases.

Yup, and it might actually cause the result you saw. still seems like an extreme reaction but it's a good trick to know if you can reproduce it. love me some big malty session beer.

This beer is much more malty than I expected and has an interesting butterscotch quality. Considering I only used 20% munich it seems to cut through more than I am accustomed to. Also, S04 has been giving me very clean beers of late. This one definitely seems to have more of an English feel. Balanced with the citrusy American hops will make this pretty interesting.

135
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 11:09:19 AM »

Could this change the fermentability of the wort?

Possibly. From what I understand, larger sugars can continue to get broken down into simpler sugars if you do not hit that 168-170 temp.

That is good to know. I normally get higher than average attenuation possibly due to low sparge temps. This procedural change could drastically impact the results I have been getting. I prefer drier beers so would like higher attenuation in most cases.

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