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Messages - goschman

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181
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry yeast for Irish Red Ale. Recommendations
« on: January 27, 2017, 11:54:08 AM »
What temps are you guys fermenting K97 at? I have noticed the tartness but not the sulfur in any way. I am normally 60-62F.

One batch (alt) was at 60F, and one batch (kolsch) was at 66F - both have significant sulfur but the alt/60F is less.  My buddy has also put about 7 beers through his taps using K97 and they all have the same sulfur-aspect in common - some to higher/lesser degrees than others.  One thing is for sure, once I picked up on the sulfur aspect of this strain it's very hard to ignore.

Thanks. I was very excited when they released this strain and was hoping to use it often. I have been using it for hybrid styles so haven't really evaluated it in the proper context.

Derail done...sorry

182
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry yeast for Irish Red Ale. Recommendations
« on: January 27, 2017, 10:44:38 AM »
What temps are you guys fermenting K97 at? I have noticed the tartness but not the sulfur in any way. I am normally 60-62F.

To the OP, I could see not using 05 if you have a hard time getting it to clear. I don't have much of an issue that others report though it usually takes a couple of weeks in the keg.

183
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry yeast for Irish Red Ale. Recommendations
« on: January 27, 2017, 07:56:28 AM »
I've never tried it, but I bet that k-97 at fairly low temps would work
I have packet of k-97 on hand too.  But I'm hesitant to use it (again).  Four months ago I tried it on a kolsch.  Bad idea!  Turned out kinda sour or slightly vinegary.  Could have been a slight infection maybe?  Dunno, but I'm a little gun-shy on that yeast.
I don't think that's an infection. When I tried K97 on a light beer I got tart flavors.  Off topic, but, I think K97 will work well for an American Wheat. Supposedly American Wheat yeast (WY1010) is a mutation from this Alt yeast. I think they have similar flavor but one flocs better than the other.

Sorry to go off topic here. I am glad you have pointed out some tart character from K97. Normally I have used it in beer styles where it works well but I did a couple German inspired brown ales that had a strange tartness as you noted. It did seem to fade with time but was pretty discouraging with relatively young beers.

I did use it in a wheat beer and it worked great.

184
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry yeast for Irish Red Ale. Recommendations
« on: January 26, 2017, 02:36:07 PM »
I have heard that US-05 works fine for an Irish Red. I think you want something clean with little to no ester production.

185
Keep us posted on the color.

My experience with Red X is that it makes the perfect red colored beer per Best's usage directions but I have yet to use it at less than 100%. My next beer is a red lager that will use 50% red x and a bit of roasted malt to make up lost color so I am curious to see where how that one will look.

186
I for one have gotten tone deaf to this LODO thing.

It would be nice to have an isolated 'LODO' brewing category.

It'd be even nicer if the LODO theists could use basic social skills and not alienate the vast majority of people they converse with.

Yeah that too

187
Beer Recipes / Re: blonde ale
« on: January 24, 2017, 11:54:13 AM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.

The three beers I brewed with it were all fermented in the 64-66F range, but (as you noted) it should be good into the low 70s.  I have not found this to be a "clean" yeast strain from the perspective of ester-neutral; for me, it's contribution was distinct and apparent.  With that said, I liked this strain quite a bit in the few beers I brewed with it (special bitter, nut brown ale, UK pale ale).

Side note: When I went through my MJ yeast testing a couple years ago, I found nearly all of their offering to have considerable lag time.  I rehydrate dry yeast and it usually helps in that regard, but the MJ offerings were slow to get going from the original sachets (lag was 18-36 hours depending on strain and circumstances).  Collected slurry, on the other hand, was quick to get to work.

Thanks for the warning on lag time. It took over 24 hours to get going. I pitched a bit too cold which didn't help...

188
I for one have gotten tone deaf to this LODO thing.

It would be nice to have an isolated 'LODO' brewing category.

189
Beer Recipes / Re: Firestone Wookey Jack
« on: January 24, 2017, 09:53:51 AM »
There are a system of caves in Somerset between Glastonbury and Bristol, known as Wookey Hole.  Given that one of the founders was from Devon (immediately south of Somerset), perhaps that's where they got he name from.

Good call! Found this on their site:
The origins of the name Wookey Jack are uncertain. Some say that it’s related to Brynildson’s favorite band, Phish. Co-proprietor and British expatriate David Walker suggests a connection to Wookey Hole, an English village noted for its dark caves and resident witch.

190
Beer Recipes / Re: Firestone Wookey Jack
« on: January 24, 2017, 09:45:31 AM »
I have made a recipe almost identical to the one in the OP and it was stellar. Differences were that I used 1272 and all flavor hops were in the whirlpool.

How close to the original I do not know. I have never been able to procure a fresh bottle here in the midwest. Apparently FW realized this problem and are discontinuing the beer, at least for broad distribution.

Interesting. I assumed their distribution would have improved drastically after partnering with Duvel or whatever they did.

I am thinking about doing a Black IPA and Wookey is the standard for me. I don't necessarily want to clone it but to do something in the same vein.
I dont think the problem was getting the beer to market so much as it wasn't moving off the shelves quick enough. I cant get their beer near me but everytime I go to Chicago I check several bottle shops. Beers like Wookie Jack and Double Jack are consistently 6, 9, and sometimes even 12 months old sitting warm on a shelf while there are several options that are far fresher (ususally local) and stored cold.

That makes sense. The beer is not pasteurized and they don't recommend anything stored above 44F and older than 120 days.

191
Beer Recipes / Re: Firestone Wookey Jack
« on: January 24, 2017, 08:46:38 AM »
I have made a recipe almost identical to the one in the OP and it was stellar. Differences were that I used 1272 and all flavor hops were in the whirlpool.

How close to the original I do not know. I have never been able to procure a fresh bottle here in the midwest. Apparently FW realized this problem and are discontinuing the beer, at least for broad distribution.

Interesting. I assumed their distribution would have improved drastically after partnering with Duvel or whatever they did.

I am thinking about doing a Black IPA and Wookey is the standard for me. I don't necessarily want to clone it but to do something in the same vein.

192
Beer Recipes / Re: Firestone Wookey Jack
« on: January 24, 2017, 07:28:11 AM »
Stevie, where did you see that Wookey? FW also says to use a dash of Wookey dust so maybe he could help me find some or has some himself.

193
Beer Recipes / Firestone Wookey Jack
« on: January 23, 2017, 03:49:56 PM »
Anyone know if the Wookey Jack clone recipe on the AHA website is close to accurate? From what I've seen on the FW site, it seems plausible...

    13.5 lb (6.12 kg) pale two-row malt
    1.66 lb (0.75 kg) Briess rye malt
    0.5 lb (227 g) Weyermann 175° L Cara-Rye malt
    0.5 lb (227 g) Weyermann 525° L Carafa III malt
    0.5 lb (227 g) Briess 550° L Midnight Wheat malt
    0.5 oz (14 g) Magnum hops, 13% a.a. (90 min)
    1.0 oz (28 g) Citra hops, 12.4% a.a. (20 min)
    1.0 oz (28 g) Amarillo Gold hops, 8.5% a.a. (20 min)
    1.75 oz (50 g) Amarillo Gold hops, 8.5% a.a. (whirlpool 5 min)
    1.75 oz (50 g) Citra hops, 12.4% a.a. (whirlpool 5 min)
    1.0 oz (28 g) Amarillo Gold hops (dry hop days 1-3)
    1.0 oz (28 g) Citra hops (dry hops days 1-3)
    1.0 oz (28 g) Amarillo Gold hops (dry hop days 4-7)
    1.0 oz (28 g) Citra hops (dy hop days 4-7)
    White Labs WLP007 Dry English Ale yeast (2,500 mL starter)


194
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Drill through Freezer / Fridge
« on: January 22, 2017, 08:36:17 PM »
I have a top freezer unit as well and drilled through the side at the very top of the fridge chamber. I second what Jim said. Use a hole saw to get through the shell and clear out the insulation to make sure you are clear. I did hit a coolant line and ruined a fridge once. I think I was drilling toward the back but don't remember...

195
The Pub / Re: Songs you never want to hear again.
« on: January 20, 2017, 08:49:31 PM »
Michael McDonald

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