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Messages - goschman

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196
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First lager yeast help
« on: January 20, 2017, 10:52:01 AM »
2 packets would be the standard advice I think. I believe it is not recommended to make starters with dry yeast. Just pitch more packets when needed.

197
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry Hopping
« on: January 20, 2017, 10:48:26 AM »
Before I started keg hopping I would dry hop in the primary after fermentation was complete. I just threw the hop pellets in. When they settled out is normally when I would package.

That's what I was thinking I would do. You never had issues with this? Hop flavor came through allright?

I never had problems however that was back when I would dramatically under hop all hoppy styles. They were pretty lackluster back then but that was purely due to not using enough hops...

I believe some prefer results when the beer is clear and off the yeast.

198
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry Hopping
« on: January 20, 2017, 10:29:15 AM »
Before I started keg hopping I would dry hop in the primary after fermentation was complete. I just threw the hop pellets in. When they settled out is normally when I would package.

199
Beer Recipes / Re: blonde ale
« on: January 20, 2017, 07:50:42 AM »
I don't like English yeasts in a Blonde Ale. I think all the ones I have tried added an unwelcome complexity from the esters.

My 2 cents. YMMV.

I very well may not like it but will never know if I don't try it. I literally have only used S04 which isn't very 'Englishy' to me so I thought it was time to give something else a shot.

200
The Pub / Re: Songs you never want to hear again.
« on: January 19, 2017, 05:39:38 PM »
That's a pretty good list. Ugh Jimmy Buffet

201
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale / American Red Recipe
« on: January 19, 2017, 03:33:12 PM »
Sounds like some solid feedback and experience.

The perfect red beer for me was a 100% Red X lager at 1.050 (surprise, surprise). I think the color estimate was right at 13 SRM which is why I target that number knowing it may end up a different hue. I have little experience in using different roasted malts to reach that red color although roasted barley is classic for an Irish Red right?

My Amber lager uses a couple oz of midnight wheat, is 11 SRM, and approaches red but definitely has that orange quality to it.

Obviously color estimates are just that. My 13 SRM beer might be identical in color to someone else's 15 SRM beer...

202
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale / American Red Recipe
« on: January 19, 2017, 02:24:10 PM »
but drop the other crystals and flaked barley?

I will defer to others on that. I keep most of my recipes very simple out of personal preference with 2-4 malts total; usually 3 unless I am doing something dark or complex.

Based on the original recipe, I would do:
10.5# two row
1# carared
3 oz carafa special III

Again, that's just me. Someone else will likely have better advice...

 

203
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale / American Red Recipe
« on: January 19, 2017, 02:15:38 PM »
So are you saying something more like
10 lbs 2 Row

8 oz. CaraRed

4 oz Carafa 

or leave flaked barley?

As Blatz noted, maybe keep the crystal pretty high for a red. Maybe a pound or more of the carared?

204
The Pub / Re: Songs you never want to hear again.
« on: January 19, 2017, 02:05:44 PM »
This helped secure my disdain for The Eagles:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JlmvtAHhnc

205
Beer Recipes / Re: blonde ale
« on: January 19, 2017, 01:53:06 PM »
I have been pretty successful with American Blonde Ales in recent comps. Usually I shoot for around 20 IBU's, but the last one I brewed for a buddies wedding and wanted to bump up the hops a tad as that is what he likes. I only bumped it up about 4 IBU's to 24 (or so). And although it scored well and took a gold medal against the other APA's in the category, judges deemed it a bit too bitter for the style. Just something to consider if you care.

Thanks for the advice. I don't get too caught up in styles. There is almost always at least one thing in most of my beers that takes it out of a particular style.

I have always done previous versions at 24 IBU with good success although bumping them down will help add some maltiness I am looking for. Something to consider for sure.

206
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale / American Red Recipe
« on: January 19, 2017, 01:45:58 PM »
I agree to shoot for 13-14 SRM. I would keep the carared and possibly use some dehusked roasted malt (carafa, midnight wheat, etc) to make up any color if necessary. Since it is a red, I suppose I could see using a significant amount of crystal if you aren't planning to mess with the recipe too much.

207
The Pub / Re: Songs you never want to hear again.
« on: January 19, 2017, 12:04:46 PM »
Hall and Oates...mostly Darryl Hall. I think that dude is a tool. I watch Darryl's House every once in a while if it is featuring an artist that I am interested in. It's an interesting love/hate thing

208
Beer Recipes / Re: blonde ale
« on: January 19, 2017, 11:54:31 AM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.

The three beers I brewed with it were all fermented in the 64-66F range, but (as you noted) it should be good into the low 70s.  I have not found this to be a "clean" yeast strain from the perspective of ester-neutral; for me, it's contribution was distinct and apparent.  With that said, I liked this strain quite a bit in the few beers I brewed with it (special bitter, nut brown ale, UK pale ale).

Side note: When I went through my MJ yeast testing a couple years ago, I found nearly all of their offering to have considerable lag time.  I rehydrate dry yeast and it usually helps in that regard, but the MJ offerings were slow to get going from the original sachets (lag was 18-36 hours depending on strain and circumstances).  Collected slurry, on the other hand, was quick to get to work.

Thanks for the feedback. I have never used MJ yeasts and don't try new yeasts very often. I will just have to give it a go and see what I get...

209
Beer Recipes / Re: blonde ale
« on: January 19, 2017, 11:20:50 AM »
From Mangrove Jack:
Famous the world over for its crisp, dry and uniquely malty and hoppy ales, this strain has
been isolated and developed especially for the home and craft brewer from a commercial
brewery in the heartland of British Brewing. Burton Union Yeast is a gentle but rapid
fermenter that generates light and delicate ripe pear esters and does not strip away light
malt character or body. Moderate acidity balances the silky smooth texture of beers
fermented with this strain. When hops or malt aromas are stronger, the yeast contribution
will be neutral. When used in lighter quality malt bases, the hops and esters are able to
shine. Beers made with this yeast are quick to condition, giving you great beer in as little
as 3 weeks

RECOMMENDED TEMPERATURE RANGE:
62-74°F (18-23°C)

I suppose I will just shoot for 66-68F or possibly lower since I am used to pretty clean yeasts...

210
Beer Recipes / Re: blonde ale
« on: January 19, 2017, 11:15:21 AM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.

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