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Messages - goschman

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241
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: May 26, 2017, 10:56:56 AM »
Yeast was CaliV and gel fined with whirlfloc in the boil.  Nothing special but step mash and a controlled recirc WP and controlled fermentation with a 40°F crash then bottle conditioned.

Grist was 80% base blend 11% oats 4.5% Munich light and 4.5% Crystal 10  water profile was a little bit off yellow malty

Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk

Thanks for the info.

242
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: May 26, 2017, 10:07:09 AM »
So this is an attempt on a clear - NEIPA.  There is 1.4oz/gal in the WP and 1.8oz/gal dry hopped IPA.  CTZ bittered 38IBUs, Centennial Galaxy Citra Idaho7 wp/dry hop.  11.8% rolled oats btw

How does she look to you?

This is the KY common I am finally getting to



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the IPA looks nice. Did you go the normal route regarding yeast selection. water profile, and oats/wheat, etc? I have been tinkering with the idea of making a West Coast/NE IPA hybrid with things I like about each substyle.

243
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Moving to dry yeast exclusively
« on: May 26, 2017, 07:52:24 AM »
So after making the statement that started this thread prepping for my last brew, I am prepping for my next brew and, yes I'm using liquid yeast.  Some people never learn.

But I couldn't find a good dry yeast for a Czech Premium Lager.  That's what I'm going with.  Yeah.

I know it doesn't matter at this point but I have heard good things about Mangrove Jack M84 - Bohemian Lager.

244
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Moving to dry yeast exclusively
« on: May 25, 2017, 07:57:25 PM »
I've been gone for a few days, but I want to touch more on my prior post.

I've seen the best results just pitching dry yeast straight, no rehydration. I suppose the difference in strains could be the case? Though in my experience S-04 isn't really like any of the liquid British yeasts I've used. It's like it's fruity in the wrong ways.

I won't even comment on US-05 from a strain perspective, as I don't like 1056/WLP001, and haven't used either in years. They're so clean as to be boring. Good for a pseudo lager, but that is IMO.

Have you tried using S-04 REALLY cool? Like, 56F-60F cool? IME, it is the most temperature-sensitive of all the strains of common dry yeast, and standard ale temperatures of 66F-70F make for horrible "homebrewy" beer, but it does a great job fermented at near-lager temperatures. I usually pitch around 52F, set my fermentation freezer to 52F, and let it rise to ~58F. When I get foamy krausen, I raise the freezer temp to 60F and let it free rise up to ~66F to finish (takes about 2 days at that point). I then let it sit at ambient for a day or two and then crash chill to 32F. IME, this will completely ferment a clean ~1.046ish bitter in about a week.

Pretty much my experience. I don't think I have gone that cold but my notes specifically say to keep it below 66F

245
Beer Recipes / Re: English Style Amber Ale (w/ Belma hops)
« on: May 24, 2017, 09:47:05 AM »
From your description, another option for hops would be El Dorado.

Maybe but El Dorado can be a really divisive hop, and to my pallet tastes more like watermelon jolly ranchers than strawberry but YMMV.

Very true. I didn't like El Dorado the one time I used but thought it might work here if used with restraint.

I'm just going with Belma here since I have a bunch of it on hand. I bought a pound to use in my Strawberry Blonde since it is supposed to come across as strawberry/citrus/melon flavor; I have never used it in a non-fruit beer, so I am excited to see how it works here. The beer that was the inspiration for this recipe came across as kind of fruity, almost strawberry-like (at least to me anyways), so I thought Belma would be a good fit.

Probably a good plan. Sorry for any unnecessary input.   

I am another that has never heard of this beer but I like what you are going for.

246
Beer Recipes / Re: English Style Amber Ale (w/ Belma hops)
« on: May 24, 2017, 08:48:15 AM »
From your description, another option for hops would be El Dorado.

Maybe but El Dorado can be a really divisive hop, and to my pallet tastes more like watermelon jolly ranchers than strawberry but YMMV.

Very true. I didn't like El Dorado the one time I used but thought it might work here if used with restraint.

247
Beer Recipes / Re: English Style Amber Ale (w/ Belma hops)
« on: May 24, 2017, 08:24:15 AM »
From your description, another option for hops would be El Dorado.

248
My go to is 34/70 but I have tried 189 once and really liked it. I have never used s23 but my buddy uses it normally and I have never noted any of weirdness others report.

249
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 23, 2017, 09:39:26 AM »
Sorry. My lack of knowledge on the topic seems to have complicated matters. Sounds like since the juice was warm on the shelf, it was already pasteurized and shouldn't be the issue.

I found a pretty basic article which has clarified things a bit for me.

What are the effects of a juice with preservatives? EDIT- nevermind. sounds like they kill yeast...

250
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 23, 2017, 08:33:41 AM »
Sulfite is just Campden, added at 1 Camden tablet per gallon a couple days before you pitch your yeast.  The Campden/sulfite kills off the nasty wild yeasts and bacteria, and while it does hurt beer yeast and wine yeast a bit (caused them to generate more sulfur), the effects fade enough after a couple days that with a healthy pitch they're able to survive it and be the only critter in your cider.

Now, if you're dry hopping or adding other things later in the fermentation, you might want to sanitize with alcohol or more sulfite to prevent any critters from grabbing hold from that point on too.

Thanks. I assumed that after it hit 7.2% abv that dry hopping would have little chance of adding infection. I suppose it already had the pellicle by that point anyway...

I will give another one a shot in a couple of weeks and see what I get.

251
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 23, 2017, 06:53:16 AM »
Cider can certainly be prone to infection.  Some microbes target sugar, others malic acid, etc.

You can sulfite your fermentation but the amount necessary is highly dependent on pH.
If this is happening in primary then you've got a sanitation problem if that is the juice you're using.  With store bought mass produced juice you will be unlikely to have the things necessary in the juice that produce spicy/smoky phenolics when interacting with lactobacillus strains, so I do agree it sounds more like brett than unintended malolactic fermentation.

If this is happening after fermentation is complete then acidifying and sulfiting may help you.

if I'm making a fairly "boring" one-note cider with plain juice then I would increase acidity and alcohol level.  Make it more of a borderline applewine.  Higher alcohol will help protect it.  Usually this involves adding white sugar but if I've got a low sugar juice then my preference is actually to slightly freeze concentrate it. I target 1.058 and above for everything I make.  1.065 is preferable.

Thanks for all the info.

Doing something above 7.2% ABV which is where this ended up is not really something I want. At the time of pitching yeast; fruit puree and agave nectar was added. It was fermented with K97 I believe and dry hopped a week before kegging. I noticed the pellicle about a month in the primary when transferring off the yeast and  the pellicle reformed in the secondary. I have acquired a taste for the finished product however it ended up different than I hoped.

I will look into acidifying and sulfiting as I have no idea what that entails...

252
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 22, 2017, 10:07:57 AM »
Ok well it sounds like I am not missing anything regarding ciders being more prone to infections based on process. I will have to chalk this up to bad sanitation practices coincidentally for the two ciders I have attempted but no problems for beer.

253
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 22, 2017, 06:48:53 AM »
what kind of Brett character?

Any residual sugar in these ciders?

How's the acid level?  Cider generally does not have a high alcohol level, and if the acidity is also low, as is fairly common with mass-produced juice, they can certainly be prone to infections of various sorts.

I believe the OG was 1.054 and FG was 1.000. I was purposely going for something with higher abv. I backsweetened with a 12 oz can of concentrate. No idea about the acid level...

I am not very familiar with Brett so I would say that its character prominent but not offensive. Has the barnyard/funky thing going on that I always hear about.

254
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 21, 2017, 01:07:45 PM »
Thought I saw somewhere that ciders are prone to infection if you don't follow some particular procedure so thought maybe it had something to do with that. Must be imagining things.

255
Other Fermentables / Re: Ciders with brett
« on: May 20, 2017, 07:41:12 PM »
Was the juice from the juice aisle or the fridge? If from the juice aisle, you don't need to pasteurize as they are shelf stable for many many months. Campden tablets would be a good idea for cider from the fridge.

Good to know. Current batch was from the juice aisle in 2 gallon jugs.

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