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Messages - goschman

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46
Ingredients / Re: malt substitute for molasses?
« on: May 24, 2016, 10:45:51 AM »
I have used Granma's Origianal with success. It is first running of cane sugar, and is unsulfured.

This is the kind I have been seeing a lot of. The recipe recommends light molasses but I can't seem to find any designations other than 'molasses' or 'black strap molasses'

47
Ingredients / Re: malt substitute for molasses?
« on: May 24, 2016, 10:44:42 AM »
Keep in mind that we are only talking about 2 oz of molasses here which I thinks worked out to about 1.3%. It seems that if I used malt I should at least double that amount which starts to darken the color past the point that I want to go which leads me to my next question: will 2 oz of some of the dark crystal malts listed be perceptible in the in the finished product? For simplicity's sake let's just say this is a wheat type beer fermented with K97

I am starting to overthink this as usual.  >:(

48
Ingredients / Re: malt substitute for molasses?
« on: May 24, 2016, 06:54:25 AM »
I don't think, from everything I've tasted, there is a malt that is a sub for molasses.  There's an undeniable flavor to molasses that is not found in other sugars - or malts for that matter.  That said, I also think molasses is very easy to overdo in beer and can be polarizing, so perhaps a super dark crystal is a better solution anyway.  You could try Patagonia Crystal 190L but it'll bring some toasty notes along with the dark sugar notes.

Thanks. I realize that there is no malt sub for molasses but thought there might be something that imparts molasses like flavors. The issue is even if there was something close, molasses is 80L while any malt I would use would likely be higher than that. This is for a ~5 SRM beer so I assume the molasses is just adding complexity more than anything. I think the amount is 2 oz at flameout. I suppose I should just find some molasses...

49
Ingredients / malt substitute for molasses?
« on: May 24, 2016, 06:33:11 AM »
Which malt would you say imparts the most molasses like flavors? I have a recipe that calls for a very small amount of molasses however I don't feel it is necessary to buy a full bottle. I am considering just using a very dark crystal malt or something that may impart a similar character.

50
Ingredients / Re: Simpsons Golden Promise extract potential
« on: May 24, 2016, 06:29:39 AM »
Thanks all. I got really low efficiency when using GP for the first time so I thought part of the problem might be a lower potential. The only other thing I can think of is that the grains were milled about 10 days prior to brewing and may have been exposed to air and short periods of sunlight.

51
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: NE IPA reviews
« on: May 20, 2016, 01:09:58 PM »
So do all of the breweries that make these beers classify them as NE IPAs? It seems that some of them other than the Tree House offerings are just typical examples of AIPAs.

I was at a beerfest here in CO a couple of weeks ago and some of the breweries that were there are starting to brew and classify beers as NE style IPAs. Until recently, the fad hadn't seemed to make it this way.

52
Haven't brewed a relatively higher gravity beer in a while so I am trying to squeeze in a Kottbusser inspired beer fashioned after Grimm Brothers Snow Drop.

48.1% Pilsner
38.4% Wheat
7.7% Flaked Oats
3.9% Honey
1.3% Molasses

1.068
K97
I finally came to the conclusion I don't like K97 at least not for beers that need to be clean flavored. I made a blonde ale with k97 that had a mild spicy phenolic flavor that really came through after a couple weeks lagering in the keg. I concluded that spicy taste would be fine for wheat beers and maybe other more complex brews, but, the blonde didn't have any other dominate flavor ingredient so  the spice/phenol was the dominate flavor.

Interesting. I haven't noticed that yet but have not really tried it in cleaner beer styles. In the beers I have used it in I couldn't detect much of a difference between it and US05 other than maybe a bit more mouthfeel since it attenuates less for me. What temps do you run it at? I think I am normally around 62F.

53
Haven't brewed a relatively higher gravity beer in a while so I am trying to squeeze in a Kottbusser inspired beer fashioned after Grimm Brothers Snow Drop.

48.1% Pilsner
38.4% Wheat
7.7% Flaked Oats
3.9% Honey
1.3% Molasses

1.068
K97

54
Ingredients / Re: Simpsons Golden Promise extract potential
« on: May 17, 2016, 01:25:37 PM »
I brewed a 100% GP ale earlier this year and got 30.66 PPG (9 lbs. of GP yielded 6 gallons post-boil of 1.046 wort).

Thanks however I am little confused. Most lighter base malts seem to be around 37 ppg or 80% yield. You got 30.66 ppg from GP which works out to 67% yield? Sorry for my lack of comprehension.

EDIT - I appear to not be using the correct terminology. I think I may have found something that cleared up my confusion. It seems that those figures work out to near 36 ppg or 78% yield in regards to the terms that I am recalling off the top of my head. Thanks!

55
Beer Recipes / Re: 559 Session IPA Batch Code #01
« on: May 17, 2016, 12:57:27 PM »
I don't use either of those yeasts however I would think that you will get more than 65% attenuation when mashing at those temps. I would do some combination of bumping up the mash temp considerably, adding more unfermentables, or shooting for a lower OG so that your ABV doesn't get higher than expected. I think you are going to want to have an OG below 1.050. Remember this is basically just a low gravity APA with IPA hop profile.

Those temps aren't that high.

Nope. They are pretty average.

56
Beer Recipes / Re: 559 Session IPA Batch Code #01
« on: May 17, 2016, 11:37:50 AM »
Question you dont do whirl-pooling?

Not really, though I should.
I'm going to revise and repost

Yea I'm new to IPAs and APAs

How would you change the Hop schedule I have to be more citrusy as you said but keep the whirlpooling?

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

Negate any IBUs contributed from a 170F whirlpool. You will not get 36 IBUs from the whirlpool additions you have listed. I did this once and it ruined my beer. Get all of your IBUs from your bittering hops if you are not doing any other additions during the boil.   

57
Ingredients / Simpsons Golden Promise extract potential
« on: May 17, 2016, 11:35:05 AM »
Anyone know it? Beersmith has it set at 82% and I got very poor efficiency compared to normal. I am curious if it is considerably lower which may explain part of my problem.

58
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer dumb phase
« on: May 17, 2016, 11:31:21 AM »
This isn't too dissimilar to bottle conditioning. I've learned not to even waste a 12oz bottle to check at 1-2 weeks. The carbonation is usually good but the beer is typically helped by a bit more time. Three weeks seems to be the starting point of good carbonation plus the beer tasting significantly better. 3-6 weeks at room temperature in the bottle is the peak period for most normal/low gravity ales, depending on style of course. If any remain at room temp after 6 weeks, I stuff as many as possible into the beer fridge and squirrel one or two in the back of the closet to see what happens to it long term.

I've also noticed that the longer the bottles sit in the fridge, the better they are. I can never seem to keep them in the fridge very long though.  ;)

I've noticed this is my bottled beers as well, but it also seems to go up and down during the process itself.  I'll taste it when I transfer to secondary, and even knowing it's not done, it'll give me a good idea, taste it when it's ready for bottling and it's awesome, then pop the first bottle after 2-3 weeks and it's kinda meh like "man... what happened..?" and then a couple more weeks later pop a bottle and it's incredible.  Especially with my hoppy IPAs and my CDA they will go through a cycle of super bright, to dull, back to super bright.  It's the weirdest thing I've ever experienced with homebrewing.  Tasted my CDA at bottling and it was super citrusy (Mosiac/Cascade blend), popped the first bottle and it was super piney.  A friend told me "Don't worry, it will go back citrusy again" and damned if he wasn't right, a couple weeks later it was the nice Citrus/Pine blend I was shooting for.

Ha! Glad I am not alone here. My current hoppy pale ale has been in the keg for about 2 weeks. A few days ago it was tasting great. I took a sample yesterday and it was dull and almost watery. Since I have experienced this before I knew it would probably come back around.

59
Beer Recipes / Re: 559 Session IPA Batch Code #01
« on: May 17, 2016, 10:50:59 AM »
I don't use either of those yeasts however I would think that you will get more than 65% attenuation when mashing at those temps. I would do some combination of bumping up the mash temp considerably, adding more unfermentables, or shooting for a lower OG so that your ABV doesn't get higher than expected. I think you are going to want to have an OG below 1.050. Remember this is basically just a low gravity APA with IPA hop profile.

60
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer dumb phase
« on: May 17, 2016, 10:13:41 AM »
Interesting topic. I have noticed the same thing as the OP especially with my APAs for some reason. Everyone always says to drink hoppy beers fresh however mine seem to be better after a few weeks. I use very simple grain bills however it always seems to take weeks for the hop and malt profile to come together. The aroma does dissipate a bit but overall the beer is better. I don't seem to notice this phenomenon with the other typical ale styles that I brew other than maybe kolsch.

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