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Messages - goschman

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751
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 11:09:19 AM »

Could this change the fermentability of the wort?

Possibly. From what I understand, larger sugars can continue to get broken down into simpler sugars if you do not hit that 168-170 temp.

That is good to know. I normally get higher than average attenuation possibly due to low sparge temps. This procedural change could drastically impact the results I have been getting. I prefer drier beers so would like higher attenuation in most cases.

752
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 10:54:03 AM »
Do you perform a mash out. If not, the first batch may have continued to convert while the later batch didn't. Personally I never mash out, but I light the fire as soon as I have the wort in the kettle.

I actually did make one procedural change and did get higher efficiency than normal on this batch. I sparged with 187F water which is higher than normal. I normally calculate my sparge water temp based on the mash temp. When I collected the first runnings, I noticed that the remaining grain was at 140. I used this to calculate a higher sparge water temp than I normally use.

I added the sparge water, gave a good stir, then started to collect 2nd runnings which were 168-170F. In the past I have noticed that this is closer to 160.

Could this change the fermentability of the wort?

753
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 09:24:08 AM »
How's it taste? Hydrometer just tells you the density, not if it's done.

I've gotten almost that low attenuation on a session beer with a 162 mash temp.

But yeah, I know what you mean. I've been guilty on several occasions of rushing things.

This is my third time brewing this beer but the first time I have mashed at 158F. The last batch had 75% attenuation when mashing at 156 and finished at 1.011 so I doubt 2 degrees would make much of a difference.

yeah, that seems pretty extreme. any cold swings in your fermentation area?

Nope stayed mostly at 64 but was in the range of 62-66 the whole time and seemed to have a pretty vigoruous fermentation. Gonna just have to try this one again. The good thing is it reminds me not to be impatient and to follow proper procdure.

754
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 09:11:43 AM »
How's it taste? Hydrometer just tells you the density, not if it's done.

I've gotten almost that low attenuation on a session beer with a 162 mash temp.

But yeah, I know what you mean. I've been guilty on several occasions of rushing things.

This is my third time brewing this beer but the first time I have mashed at 158F. The last batch had 75% attenuation when mashing at 156 and finished at 1.011 so I doubt 2 degrees would make much of a difference.

755
General Homebrew Discussion / reiterate the importance of patience
« on: January 31, 2014, 08:50:25 AM »
Just a venting post here. I am very disappointed in myself.

I brewed what I call a "session ale" with S04 and decided to keg after 10 days since the yeast had dropped clear and it appeared to have a good, robust fermentation between 62-66F. I usually let it sit for 14-21 days but rushed it due to lack of homebrew. I did not look at the hydrometer reading until after kegging was done. The beer was super clear and there was a compact yeast cake at the bottom of the bucket.

There is a possibility that it was done but it finished at 1.016 (65% attenuation) instead of 1.011 which was anticipated. I mashed at 158F for the first time but I doubt it would have such a large impact. If I would have had the patience I would have taken a hydrometer reading while it was still in the fermenter, roused the yeast, and warmed it up. I could have transferred the keg back to fermenter but honestly did not want to deal with it.

The thing that make me angry is I don't know if it was done or not. This is a beer that I am trying to develop as a regular so results of this batch will likely be inconclusive due to the high FG and lower ABV.

ALWAYS TAKE HYDROMETER READINGS BEFORE PACKAGING YOUR BEER!! I know this but I still let impatience get the best of me. It is funny how much of an amateur I sill am after years of brewing...

756
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Clear Beer!
« on: January 29, 2014, 09:56:05 AM »
Hoping my Kolsch will clear. Been in the keg for almost 3 weeks now. Used WLP029 and finings. I usually don't have an issue with clarity but this one might end up a bit stubborn...

757
Beer Recipes / Re: apricot beer?
« on: January 29, 2014, 09:49:42 AM »
This beer has won gold at GABF. They might be able to provide some pointers...

http://drydockbrewing.com/our-beer/apricot-blonde-2

758
Beer Recipes / Re: Blond ale
« on: January 29, 2014, 09:46:00 AM »
I like the idea of it but the .5 oz of midnight wheat is definitely unnecessary.

759
Beer Recipes / Re: Chili pepper porter recipe?
« on: January 28, 2014, 04:28:57 PM »

True, but the flavor of Habaneros is fantastic. You can really dial a lot of that heat down by carefully de-seeding/destemming them. I'm also tempted to grow some of these this year:

http://www.cooksgarden.com/vegetables/peppers/hot-pepper-zavory-prod000250.html?catId=2037&trail=

+a bunch. This is spot on in my opinion. Though about 100 times hotter than a jalapeño, the flavor is far superior. If used in moderation at a medium between heat and flavor, you're not going to find a better pepper than a habanero.

I plan on attempting a mango/habanero beer of sort this year. Sure, you can add a blind amount of habanero to a beer and melt the faces off anybody who drinks it, or you can focus on flavoring it with habanero and make a nice chili flavored beer that finishes with a touch of heat. Le others said, I think I'd add a bit at a time regardless of chili choice until you get your desired flavor and heat.

You basically nailed what I am going for. The beer inspiring me used apricots I believe but I am not sure what fruit I will use yet.

760
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Denny's Favorite Fermentation Temp
« on: January 28, 2014, 02:51:49 PM »
I need to try this stuff out. Denny do you have a lifetime supply? If so, could you send me some?  ;)

761
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: commercial examples of Kolsch
« on: January 28, 2014, 10:01:21 AM »
Having spent three days in Cologne this past October I did extensive research on this subject.  8)

The best one was Päffgen.  it had a nice straw/mowed grass crisp bite to it.  Wonderful stuff.

I also greatly enjoyed Fruh, Mühlen and Sion. Mühlen had the best fresh malt flavor.

Gansel, Peters and Gaffel were also quite nice.

Probably the only one that didn't do much for me was Gilden.  Kind of like the Coors of Kolsch.

Coorlsch! Seems like most of those might be hard to come by in CO

762
Beer Recipes / Re: Chili pepper porter recipe?
« on: January 27, 2014, 12:52:29 PM »
Got a response:

"Habenero peppers will work but we use Scotch Bonnets for their intense fruity aroma. I wouldn't know how many peppers in a 5 gallon batch but I can tell you we use roughly 8-10 pound for 500 gallons. Peppers are different every time I use them so the best way to make that decision would be to take a bite and see how spicy they are. There is no science behind this process, I'm a chili head and a major fan of all things spicy so I developed a feel for the pepper I'm using.

Rough chop the peppers ( seeds and all ) and dry hop your finished beer. Do not add to the boil or you will get an unpleasant vegetable aroma.

Once dry hopped wait a few days and taste, when your desired spice level has been achieved rack the beer off your peppers."

Looks like this would equate roughly to 1.5 oz for a 5 gallon batch. Honestly I am pretty bad at drawing conclusions from unfinished, uncarbed beers which is why I am hesitant. If my memory serves correct, this was not a very spicy beer which is why I liked it and why I was thinking habs since there heat level is similar to scotch b's. Looks like scotch bonnet would be the way to go if I want to get something similar.

Thanks for the responses. At least I know how I should do it...

763
Beer Recipes / Re: Chili pepper porter recipe?
« on: January 27, 2014, 12:19:06 PM »
Sent an inquiry to the brewery that is the inspiration for this beer so hopefully I will get a response.

I will likely be going the vodka route on this one. I suppose I can just add a little bit at a time.

764
Beer Recipes / Re: Chili pepper porter recipe?
« on: January 27, 2014, 11:56:29 AM »
Personally I prefer to avoid dried chilies. I normally use two peppers per gallon and leave them for 48-72 hours. Habaneros are fun. Good flavor with a long lingering heat. Jalapeños are good for flavor and medium heat and anaheims are nice too.

Sorry if I am hijacking... I am planning to add habaneros to an upcoming 5 gallon batch. You recommend using 2 peppers per gallon? I am going for something more subdued than a normal chile beer but still noticeable. Maybe 1 pepper per gallon?

I'm a chile head, but I don't normally see habanero and "subdued" in the same sentence. I wouldn't use much of it if that's what you're after.

Yeah I know that probably sounds off. I guess I just need a good starting point since I have never used peppers of any kind in a beer. This is based on a beer that uses scotch bonnets which appear to have the same 'scoville' rating as Habaneros. I guess I can try to reach out to the brewery for amount recommendations

765
Beer Recipes / Re: Chili pepper porter recipe?
« on: January 27, 2014, 11:46:37 AM »
Personally I prefer to avoid dried chilies. I normally use two peppers per gallon and leave them for 48-72 hours. Habaneros are fun. Good flavor with a long lingering heat. Jalapeños are good for flavor and medium heat and anaheims are nice too.

Sorry if I am hijacking... I am planning to add habaneros to an upcoming 5 gallon batch. You recommend using 2 peppers per gallon? I am going for something more subdued than a normal chile beer but still noticeable. Maybe 1 pepper per gallon?

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