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Messages - garc_mall

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481
Beer Recipes / Re: Roast porter
« on: October 10, 2012, 07:28:52 PM »
I also don't think that 4oz of each (RB and BP) will really put the roast high enough to be out of style. In 5 gallons, I am usually between 8-12oz of roast malt in my robust porters.

482
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: simcoe bittering
« on: October 07, 2012, 08:06:31 PM »
I have not used simcoe for bittering at all, I only use it as a flavor/aroma hop.

However, I really like magnum for my "single hop charge" beers. I find it has a more rounded bitterness that isn't quite so in your face. If I remember right, simcoe has a bit harsher bitterness.

483
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer tasting books?
« on: October 07, 2012, 07:27:18 PM »
Any recommendations for books that would help me learn how to identify what I'm tasting?

Have you read Tasting Beer by Randy Mosher?

Much agreement. However, I think the best way to learn how to identify what you are tasting is to work with others in a pseudo-tasting panel. If you can compare notes, its easier to identify flavors.

484
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Tips for the beginner
« on: October 06, 2012, 03:53:38 PM »
I agree with everything said here. Make more beer. Drink more beer. The nice thing is, as long as you maintain sanitation, and are close on fermentation temps, you will have beer that tastes pretty good. As you become more familiar with your personal tastes, you can start honing your beer in on what you like. Until then, Relax, Don't worry, and have a homebrew. RDWHAHB.

485
Beer Recipes / Re: First Barleywine
« on: October 02, 2012, 10:12:09 AM »
Also, I'd personally keep it in secondary for longer...but that's just me (some of my barleywines/Burton ales have stayed in secondary for a year).   I just find that it results in (to me) a better brew and lessens the likelihood of  foamouts or bottle bombs for those bottles that make it to the two year mark (or longer)...and it's those bottles that will be the best tasting, hands down.  You will wish you had made more or, at the very least, you'll wish that you had saved more.  Trust me on this. 8)

So there's a difference between bulk ageing and bottle ageing? Say you made two batches of barleywine and bottled one after one month and bottled the other after 10 months, then tasted both after one year total conditioning time (carboy+bottle), do you think there would be a big difference?

My understanding is that it is more about consistency (and in this case left over sugars). If you bottle a barleywine after 1 month, and then age for a year, the yeast all change the beer in slightly different ways. If you bulk age, all of the beer ages the same way.

I'm happy to be corrected, but I'm not sure I buy that theory.  A properly mixed beer with priming solution should be homogenous from racking into the bottling bucket, so there should not be inconsistencies like that. Yes I can understand bulk aging to be sure you don't bottle too early and avoid bottle bombs from tired yeast, but I don't buy the argument that they'll all have different sugar amounts in there if you don't.  To me that just suggests poor bottling practice.

I wasn't talking about different sugar amounts in the changes. As Joe Sr. said, two bottles can have pretty vast differences between them after a year or two. If you leave the whole beer in the carboy for that year, you are minimizing differences between the bottles. This is why I have heard that some people like to bulk age for 6mos to a year for the big beers, before bottling. The fact that it helps make sure you don't bottle to early and have bottle bombs is a bonus. I know nothing about commercial aging processes, but I agree that they probably don't age beer unless its in a barrel of some sort. I know black raven has a conditioning tank in their cold room that they condition some beers in before they keg, but I don't think it is used for more than a couple weeks, and that is to smooth out some of the barrel aged beers.

486
Beer Recipes / Re: Drying out an APA
« on: October 02, 2012, 10:04:16 AM »
I did a "APA" with 35% munich and no crystal. It turned out pretty amber, and I started referring to it as an american amber. I loved the beer, so did a lot of people that tried it, but it didn't do so well at competitions, coming across as too dry. I don't think it helped that American ambers are supposed to be sweet, but I think it ended up on the dry side for an APA as well. However, if you don't plan on entering it in a competition, I love that blend, and I think the maltiness of munich can really support the hops and make for a more interesting beer.

487
Beer Recipes / Re: First Barleywine
« on: October 01, 2012, 06:25:25 PM »
Also, I'd personally keep it in secondary for longer...but that's just me (some of my barleywines/Burton ales have stayed in secondary for a year).   I just find that it results in (to me) a better brew and lessens the likelihood of  foamouts or bottle bombs for those bottles that make it to the two year mark (or longer)...and it's those bottles that will be the best tasting, hands down.  You will wish you had made more or, at the very least, you'll wish that you had saved more.  Trust me on this. 8)

So there's a difference between bulk ageing and bottle ageing? Say you made two batches of barleywine and bottled one after one month and bottled the other after 10 months, then tasted both after one year total conditioning time (carboy+bottle), do you think there would be a big difference?

My understanding is that it is more about consistency (and in this case left over sugars). If you bottle a barleywine after 1 month, and then age for a year, the yeast all change the beer in slightly different ways. If you bulk age, all of the beer ages the same way.

488
The Pub / Re: Finding a city
« on: September 27, 2012, 10:54:50 PM »
Ok, gotta put my plug in for the PNW. On the tech thing, we win hands down. Nowhere else in the country has the tech scene we have (not even silicon valley).

Tom, my background is in the LAMP stack, so mostly web stuff. I believe MSFT is still C/C#/Visual C etc, so I'm not sure if they'd be able to accept my resume (stellar though as it is  ::) )

OK, so I don't speak y'all's language, but I did say we have tech all over the place. MSFT, Google, Facebook, Zynga, and thats just the big players. There are a LOT of smaller players and start ups that could use the web type thing. I was looking at recruiting in this area, so I have done a bit of looking at the IT field.

489
Beer Recipes / Re: Sour beer
« on: September 26, 2012, 07:52:35 PM »
This is my favorite resource for sour beer brewing.

http://web.archive.org/web/20100410025103/http://www2.parc.com/emdl/members/apte/flemishredale.shtml

However, my first flanders red is only 6 weeks old, so I don't have full experience.

490
I haven't tried to bottle with twist off caps. However, I know that the twist off caps are slightly thinner than their pry-off bretheren, and I have heard that you can't get as good of a seal using bottles with twist off caps. I would recommend using pry-off bottles if you have access to them.

491
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing This Weekend - 9/28 Edition
« on: September 26, 2012, 07:07:17 PM »
I have an extremely busy weekend... but I really would like to brew a batch of something. I also need to rack my flanders red on to 10lb of raspberries...

492
The Pub / Re: Finding a city
« on: September 26, 2012, 06:40:56 PM »
Ok, gotta put my plug in for the PNW. On the tech thing, we win hands down. Nowhere else in the country has the tech scene we have (not even silicon valley). I think we match up pretty well on beer as well, but I am biased. We have to have the most homebrew clubs per capita though... I have 4 homebrew clubs within 30mins of my house that all poured at NHC this year.

The one major issue the Seattle area has is the lack of commuter train coverage. We have one light rail that goes from downtown to the airport, and they are supposedly working on a train to downtown Bellevue, but that is in like 2017. For as progressive as we think we are, we are way behind on public transportation. If you are looking at decent housing prices and space (for chickens and bees), I would recommend somewhere up further north, in south Snohomish county. They have better prices and lower taxes, but are a bit further out of the way.

also, our housing prices are rather high here as well.

493
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Let's talk southern tier
« on: September 23, 2012, 10:15:09 PM »
Oh BTW I'm having some rumble IPA right now from southern tier...

Tasty.  Tons of vanilla.  Kind of smooth and slick and a little oily.  Nicely hopped.  Very obviously oak aged even though it's not overpowering.  It's pretty solid if you like oak aged IPAs.  Sometimes I think oak aging can clash with an IPA but southern tier's unearthly oak aged IPA is good (although a little overblown, but I love it anyway) and the rumble is much more mellow and balanced and also quite good. 

FWIW southern tier's regular unearthly IPA is also quite good.

Rumble is Great Divide, isn't it? or did southern tier release their own one? The GDBC beer is pretty tasty.

494
Ingredients / Re: Coffee Stout
« on: September 22, 2012, 12:24:50 AM »
I have used 2 different methods to get coffee flavor in my beer.

1. Espresso at bottling. I found this added good flavor, but I picked up no aroma of coffee in my porter that I used this in.

2. Cold Brewed Coffee. I got a lot more aroma out of this type of addition, but that may have been because of the lower alcohol content (2.6 to 6.5 abv).

that is my experience so far. YMMV. I do plan on adding coffee in different forms to more beers, and if I find more information, I will add it to the overall homebrew reference.

495
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Amount of Wyeast Nutrient in starter
« on: September 21, 2012, 11:13:27 PM »
I am probably over doing it, but it works, and I don't mess with it.

I usually add 1/2 tsp to the starter (2qts or so) and then another 1/2 tsp to the batch 10 or so minutes before the end of the boil. I haven't noticed any off-flavors.

I am willing to admit, it may be a superstitious addition, same as my 1/4lb of wheat malt to each beer. But if it works, I am generally unwilling to change it.

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