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Messages - jmcamerlengo

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601
Belgian Dark Strong and Belgian Tripel for me this Sunday

Kegging a Cal Common, Robust Porter, ESB and Imperial Stout.

I heart beer.

602
I actually got all of that crap done! It was a 14 hour day but it all got done saturday.  Sweet, im gona have alot of beer for the holidays!

603
Bottling

Milk Stout
English IPA
Scottish 70
English BarleyWine
RIS
Breakfast Stout
ESB

Kegging

American BarleyWine
Imperial IPA
Dry Hopped RIS
Hefeweizen
California Common
ESB
Robust Porter

Brewing

10 gallons of Pumpkin Ale


....busy weekend
:o

Update us Monday with how much of that you actually got done :)  If you accomplish half, I'll be impressed.


Thats what family and friends who like to drink my beer are for! Two taking turns filling, two taking turns capping, and 1 doing the racking while Im brewing....well I do have a brutus system so I dont have to do much other than tell them what to do haha.

Plus I enforce child labor on keg scrubbing ;)

604
Bottling

Milk Stout
English IPA
Scottish 70
English BarleyWine
RIS
Breakfast Stout
ESB

Kegging

American BarleyWine
Imperial IPA
Dry Hopped RIS
Hefeweizen
California Common
ESB
Robust Porter

Brewing

10 gallons of Pumpkin Ale


....busy weekend

605
Equipment and Software / Re: Proper Drill for Milling Grain
« on: November 29, 2011, 09:14:26 AM »
on a related note...can you mill the grain too fast? whats proper speed or does it not matter?

606
Beer Recipes / Re: Caramel Machiato
« on: November 23, 2011, 09:05:11 AM »
I read somewhere that in Southern Tier's creme brulee stout(which is freaking phenomenal and has an insane carmel flavor) they take table sugar and carmelize it in a pan turning it into a brown caramel sauce then add it to the boil for the last couple minutes.  Give it a shot, it really lends that caramel sweetness and flavor you're probably looking for.

I'd also cold brew some starbucks coffee with a fresh vanilla bean or 2 split in half and add that to the secondary.

607
Beer Recipes / Re: Scottish 70
« on: November 23, 2011, 09:02:26 AM »
I can attest to Jamil's recipe being great as well as the one you have listed there!  I actually brew the roasted barley with edinburgh yeast for the fall and Jamil's recipe for the spring.

I do collect the first gallon of runnings and boil the volume down to half a gallon in both cases.  Both make great beer.

608
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: lager starter step-up calculation
« on: November 22, 2011, 01:36:58 PM »
multi step starters do indeed work best.  The most efficient starters for liquid yeast packages are actually between the 1.5-3L range according to Jamil and Chris White's book on yeast management.

If youre in a scenario where you need to make say a 5L starter and only have a 2L flask. Id recommend this

pitch your yeast into a 1L starter. let ferment out.
pitch that whole cake into a 2L starter let ferment out.
move half of the slurry into another sanitary container
pitch the other half of the slurry into another 2L starter.

Pitch both slurries into your batch.


This seems like a great idea. Reduces the cell density, keeps the volumes optimal and keeps the financial review committee from from contorting her eyebrows at me when I bring home another huge piece of glass... and another receipt. ;)


The financial review committee can make you re-think how you do things haha. I've got one myself!

609
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: lager starter step-up calculation
« on: November 22, 2011, 11:32:45 AM »
multi step starters do indeed work best.  The most efficient starters for liquid yeast packages are actually between the 1.5-3L range according to Jamil and Chris White's book on yeast management.

If youre in a scenario where you need to make say a 5L starter and only have a 2L flask. Id recommend this

pitch your yeast into a 1L starter. let ferment out.
pitch that whole cake into a 2L starter let ferment out.
move half of the slurry into another sanitary container
pitch the other half of the slurry into another 2L starter.

Pitch both slurries into your batch.

610
Ingredients / Re: Home smoked malt
« on: November 21, 2011, 12:56:49 PM »
You can build a cold smoker with a couple of really cheap things.  I use this process to cold smoke salmon.  heres what you need.

A small handheld battery operated fan.
A coffee or candle heater or small electric heater of sorts
A very small pan that fits on the coffee heater
A Cardboard box
An Aluminum foil pan to hold the malt

Cut a vent hole in the cardboard that you can work out of and easily slide things in and out of, also a small hole to run the coffee heater electric cord out of.

Place the heater inside and fill the pan that goes on it with saw dust of your favorite wood(or very small wood chips).  If you're using chips make sure you soak them in liquid....beer is my preference, water is fine.  Soak for about 4 hours prior to using.

puncture several small holes in the bottom of the aluminum pan and fill it with your malt.

PLace the small handheld fan in there to circulate the smoke and keep it running.

plug the heater in and you're good to go.  The saw dust will burn relatively quickly but give you a really good amount of smoke.  You may need to refill your small pan every 45 minutes or so as they burn up to keep fresh smoke in there.


(if you wanna do salmon puncture a wooden dowel in there and tie the salmon to the dowel)  It works great for cold smoking!

611
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Belgian Bottling
« on: November 21, 2011, 12:35:50 PM »
Ive used those plastic corks on Chimay type belgian bottles and they dont work! I put the twist cap on it and everything.  Bottled a tripel and quad with those and lost both batches due to the things leaking.  I dont recommend the plastic ones with belgian beer bottles(they do work fine with champagne or wine bottles tho)

612
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: German Hefeweizen
« on: November 17, 2011, 01:34:30 PM »
I like to employ a step mash of 111 for 20 minutes and 150 for 45 or until completion.

I also prefer blending the WLP300 and 380 and ferment at 62.  Personally I cant really tell any distinguishable difference between decocting to get to your 150 from 111 as opposed to just step mashing.

613
Hefeweizen and a Cal Common for me. yummy

614
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Brewer Heat pads
« on: November 16, 2011, 01:28:03 PM »
The heat pads vary with the type of beer Im doing.  The overall freezer temp sits at about 40.  The heat pads are plastic and sit directly under the carboy, with the insulation in there the heat pads are actually operating about 5 minutes every 2 hours on average( a little more if im fermenting in the high 60s low 70s.  The insulation does a great job of keeping the cold air out of the small fermentation side, and with the one temp controller controlling the freezer being placed as far away from the insulated side as possible, it runs pretty efficiently(kicks on every couple hours with a 3 degree differential).  I've taken every precaution I can to assure that it runs efficiently as possible!  Also the pads dont suck much energy.  Space is one of my biggest considerations.  I have room for the one freezer and thats about it, and dont have much anywhere else in the house to maintain consistent temps.

I am going to try the carboy with water and put it on the very bottom and see where were at at the bottom as opposed to the fermometer in the middle of the carboy.

Hopefully a new house is coming soon with a garage and a bit more space!

615
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Brewer Heat pads
« on: November 16, 2011, 11:08:28 AM »
The freezer is enormous(can hold 9 cornys and 2 6 gal carboys).

The first temp controller is controlling the freezer itself set to 36-38 degrees. That probe is just dangling amidst the kegs.  The one side of the freezer is insulated off from the kegs. There is a separate temp controller that I use to control both heat pads.  I tape that controller to the side of the carboy, but it against the other carboy and put a little bit of bubblewrap insulation around the probe where it would be exposed to ambient air temp.  The controller controls both heat pads(I always brew similar beers together or the same beer and experiment with yeast or something so I dont hafta worry about one fermentation being much more active than the other, the carboys stay within 1 degree of each other). 

I tape the probe about 4-6 inches above the bottom of the carboys.

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