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Messages - erockrph

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1
The Pub / Re: Maui - Hawaii Sea Spirits
« on: August 16, 2016, 02:13:46 AM »
Very cool! For the rim, do they ferment the unprocessed cane juice, Cachaça-style?

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I feel like an olypian.
« on: August 13, 2016, 08:17:58 AM »
I feel like an Olympian because I've been drinking caipirinha's every night this week. Your story is much better :)

Congrats, Steve!

3
Beer Recipes / Re: tips for brett blonde
« on: August 08, 2016, 08:42:40 PM »
When brett has to struggle it creates more funk flavors. When situations are ideal it creates more clean flavors. If you add brett to a "finished" beer that has dextrines to slowly chew on it will create more funk flavors than when you pitch it in fresh wort. So you can have a 100% brett fermented beer that tastes cleaner than, say, Orval where the brett is added post fermentation.
Actually, I think a lot of wild beer brewers are moving away from this line of thinking. The reason Brett makes a funkier beer in secondary is because a Saccharomyces primary ferment creates the precursor compounds that Brett turns into more complex flavors. So in Orval's case, for example, Brett has plenty of esters and phenols to work with from the primary ferment with a Belgian ale yeast.

I would recommend a starter for the Brett. It may take a couple of steps to reach target pitching rates, given the lower cell counts in commercial packaging. Brett starters also take longer than Saccharomyces to get going. Each step may take 3-5 days (maybe even a week for the initial step).

The point of the starter isn't so much to ensure a clean beer, but to get to full attenuation in a reasonable amount of time.

4
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Are We All Overpitching All Dry Yeasts?!
« on: August 08, 2016, 08:22:49 PM »
What if I want more phenols, not esters?

Ferment colder?  It's not a hard and fast rule, but for yeasts that can produce esters and phenols (Belgian and German wheat) colder fermentation often expresses the latter.
I was under the impression that fermenting cooler didn't necessarily increase phenol production. Rather, it suppressed ester production, and thereby swinging the phenol/ester balance towards the phenolics. Of course, that could just be another homebrew myth.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 6 Common Homebrew Myths
« on: August 08, 2016, 08:18:16 PM »
A good list, but I would quibble with the liquid vs. dry yeasts.  I would agree that they are equivalent for neutral yeasts (lagers, American ale), but for those styles where you want the yeast to produce esters and phenols, such as Belgians, British, and German weissbiers, I find all the dry yeasts lacking compared to the liquid varieties that are available.
I think the reason that liquid yeast is better for specialty styles is primarily because of the specific choices available. If there was a dry equivalent of 1762 or 3787, I would be surprised if you couldn't make a good Belgian ale with it.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: No bitter addition?
« on: August 05, 2016, 09:52:05 AM »
I've tried it a few times and was generally unhappy with the results.  Maybe I didn't try it on the right styles.
Maybe it's not your tastes? If you're looking for a firm bitterness, this isn't going to get you there. Even at 98 measured IBU's I found the bitterness to be a bit softer than a traditional boil addition. I have some suspicions that humulinones (the compounds hops that add bitterness in a dry hop addition, but are not as bitter as iso-alpha acids) may have some role in this, but that is just speculation on my part.

7
What kind of string?

I use dental floss tape with a glob of keg lube at the O-ring. Works great.
Keg lube! Of course! I've had issues with a leaky seal when I tried this in the past. Never thought to add some keg lube. Thanks for the tip!

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« on: August 05, 2016, 07:08:25 AM »
Not sure what all the fuss is about. I recently brewed this "New England Pale Ale":

OG: 1.051, FG: 1.009
75% MO
25% Flaked Oats
60 IBUs of Magnum @ 60 min
1 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe @ 0 min
2 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe for 20 min whirlpool @ 150F
WY1318 (Boddington's) open fermented @ 68F for 2 weeks.
100ppm each of Ca, SO4 and Cl.

Bottled it, let it carb for a few weeks @ RT, 2 days in the fridge and it pours damn near commercial clear out of the bottle. Nowhere near hazy let alone turbid. Absolutely delicious beer - maybe one of the best APA/AIPAs I've ever made but I'm not getting the look nor the "juicy" mouthfeel everyone talks about with these beers. I'm confused but love the results nonetheless.  :P

Triple the amount of hops you use and triple the length of your whirlpool. You will have all the haze you want at that point.

In my experience, it's really about the 4 oz/gallon mark where the haze becomes unavoidable. My one stab at the "intentionally hazy IPA" style (using about 22% flaked grains in the grist) definitely brought the haziness to another level (from "super-hazy" up to "opaque"). But even using nothing but light DME and US-05, you still get a damn hazy beer if you push the hops hard enough.

+1;  The science of this haze is actually quite simple: Polyphenols (PP) are haze precursors.  Hops are abundant with PP.  PP are precipitated and removed by boiling wort.  So, if you add alot of hops and do not boil them (<170F whirpool) you get haze.  That simple.
I will be tapping my IPA that used a 120F whirlpool as my sole hop addition in the next few days. It will be interesting to see the level of haze it has.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: No bitter addition?
« on: August 04, 2016, 07:34:32 PM »
This is pretty much my standard IPA procedure. All my hops go in at flameout, followed by a 90 minute hop stand. The beer I had measured came in at 98 IBU, but it tasted closer to 60. Plenty bitter for an IPA, but the dominant character is massive hop flavor.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« on: August 04, 2016, 05:28:55 PM »
Not sure what all the fuss is about. I recently brewed this "New England Pale Ale":

OG: 1.051, FG: 1.009
75% MO
25% Flaked Oats
60 IBUs of Magnum @ 60 min
1 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe @ 0 min
2 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe for 20 min whirlpool @ 150F
WY1318 (Boddington's) open fermented @ 68F for 2 weeks.
100ppm each of Ca, SO4 and Cl.

Bottled it, let it carb for a few weeks @ RT, 2 days in the fridge and it pours damn near commercial clear out of the bottle. Nowhere near hazy let alone turbid. Absolutely delicious beer - maybe one of the best APA/AIPAs I've ever made but I'm not getting the look nor the "juicy" mouthfeel everyone talks about with these beers. I'm confused but love the results nonetheless.  :P

Triple the amount of hops you use and triple the length of your whirlpool. You will have all the haze you want at that point.

In my experience, it's really about the 4 oz/gallon mark where the haze becomes unavoidable. My one stab at the "intentionally hazy IPA" style (using about 22% flaked grains in the grist) definitely brought the haziness to another level (from "super-hazy" up to "opaque"). But even using nothing but light DME and US-05, you still get a damn hazy beer if you push the hops hard enough.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: How much victory is too much?
« on: August 04, 2016, 10:19:25 AM »
Thanks guys.  I think I'll dial down the victory malt a bit based on the comments, and maybe for fun try toasting wheat flakes for a bit of added toastiness, if that's a word.  No idea if 2.5% toasted wheat would be noticeable, but why not try?
You could certainly try, but I find that I get the character you're looking for from torrified wheat without needing to toast it.

12
Beer Recipes / Re: How much victory is too much?
« on: August 03, 2016, 03:30:44 PM »
I think 10% would be pushing it. I look at Victory as an accent malt that gives a similar character to a rich Pale Ale malt like Maris Otter. If you want more than an accent note, then you are better suited using MO as your base malt instead of pushing the Victory higher.

You can replace the "Victory" with "Aromatic" and the "Maris Otter" with "Light Munich" is the above statement, by the way.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


13
Hop Growing / Re: my Galena hops are flowering but no cones
« on: August 02, 2016, 11:27:40 AM »
I started 3 plants this year. My Sterlings have had cones for about a month, but no real lupulin development yet. My Pacific Gem has just started to flower, and my Sorachi Ace has no signs of anything yet. But I'm not expecting much, given that it's year one, and we've had problems with both drought and gypsy moths. I'm just thankful for having relatively healthy plants at this point.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 6 oz of hops
« on: July 31, 2016, 06:28:50 PM »
That's what I do for every batch of IPA that I make.  I was just tweaking the recipe for my next brew, an IPA.  It has 12.5 oz.   I have gone over a pound, but my impression is that the beer tastes weird until it is about a month old then it shines. 



Yep, I resemble that, too.  12-16 is about right for my AIPA tastes.
Same here. For 3 gallons, that is :D

15
I'm beginning to think that this beer is cursed. I brewed this recipe again today. This time I forgot to put the temp probe back in my fermentation chamber/keezer after cleaning out the last batch. Thankfully I caught it before the new beer froze, but it was a close call. It will be interesting to see how US-05 works when dropped down to 40F shortly after pitching.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


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