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Messages - erockrph

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1006
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 14, 2015, 10:06:27 PM »
A BCS Märzen with WLP830.  I gotta ask:  what does BCS stand for?
I would assume it means "Brewing Classic Styles"

1007
I toured an AB brewery years ago and the tour guide mentioned settling was the reasoning for using the wood in the lagering tanks. The way the wood is cut into ribbons produces a lot of surface area without compaction. Basically it gives the yeast a short path to a surface to land on.
This is what I had heard as well. I think I either heard it an interview with Mitch Steele, or from someone on the BN referring to Mitch as his source.

1008
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Playing around with final beer pH
« on: October 14, 2015, 03:50:54 PM »
Depends on their mash temps. Limit dextrinase activity drops off above 145F. And while it's peak activity is at 5.4 pH, it still is pretty active in the range from 5.0-5.8.

I believe that we have covered this paper in the past, but I am reposting it for those who were not part of the discussion: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/j.2050-0416.1999.tb00020.x/pdf

And the TL;DR quote from the summary:

Quote
The temperature optimum of the limit dextrinase of a malt extract was 60-62.5°C And the pH optimum 5.0-5.5. In The pH range 5.4-5.8, The limit dextrinase activity was the higher, the lower the mash pH.

1009
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Percentage Based Extract Method
« on: October 14, 2015, 10:31:45 AM »

Even if I do a steep I can usually keep it at or below an hour. It isn't perfect and doesnt offer the control of AG or BIAB, but using the percentages lets me at least approximate AG/BIAB recipes.

My one concern was and will still be the levels of attenuation I get using extract.
That can be managed using some simple sugar if needed and sticking to Pilsen or Extra Light DME as the bulk of your base extract (those are the most fermentable, in my experience).

Extract beers are best suited to beers that rely on hops, yeast, and/or specialty grains for the bulk of their flavor. A beer such as a Dunkel or Märzen that gets the bulk of its flavor from base malt won't have as rich of a base malt character compared to using all-grain.

What about Munich extract?

My extra Belgians have been solid too.
In my experience, the extracts fall a bit short in flavor, although I admit that I primarily use DME. Really fresh LME may give better results.

Your extract Belgians are probably solid more from the yeast's contribution rather than the extract.

1010
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Percentage Based Extract Method
« on: October 14, 2015, 09:56:12 AM »
Even if I do a steep I can usually keep it at or below an hour. It isn't perfect and doesnt offer the control of AG or BIAB, but using the percentages lets me at least approximate AG/BIAB recipes.

My one concern was and will still be the levels of attenuation I get using extract.
That can be managed using some simple sugar if needed and sticking to Pilsen or Extra Light DME as the bulk of your base extract (those are the most fermentable, in my experience).

Extract beers are best suited to beers that rely on hops, yeast, and/or specialty grains for the bulk of their flavor. A beer such as a Dunkel or Märzen that gets the bulk of its flavor from base malt won't have as rich of a base malt character compared to using all-grain.

1011
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Playing around with final beer pH
« on: October 14, 2015, 09:24:51 AM »
There are some German breweries that mash at a more typical 5.4 to 5.5 pH and then drop the kettle wort pH a couple of tenths.

Two words "limit dextrinase"
Depends on their mash temps. Limit dextrinase activity drops off above 145F. And while it's peak activity is at 5.4 pH, it still is pretty active in the range from 5.0-5.8.

1012
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Playing around with final beer pH
« on: October 14, 2015, 08:28:12 AM »
I've done this the other way with bicarb in a porter, but I've never thought to add acid to pale beers. I can think of a few beers that ended up a bit flabby and this may have been the missing piece. I will definitely be trying this in the future if needed. Thanks for sharing, Jim!

1013
Remember to check your munich malt before assuming anything about its modification.  Best Malz munich is pretty well modified.
Fair enough, although that may still be a good example. A "Pale Ale" kilned heirloom UK varietal may be a better example for what I was trying to get at.

I guess the TL;DR of my previous post is that if a malt has a higher alpha amylase content then it can tolerate a higher mash temperature and/or longer mash, yet still retain some alpha amylase activity by the end of the mash.

This probably explains why there is data showing peak fermentability from mashes in the mid-150's, rather the 140's as we'd typically expect. If your malt is hot enough, then you can push your mash further into beta range before you lose the bulk of your alpha activity.  Your main variables are the half-life of the reaction that denatures your alpha amylase, and the amount of alpha present in the mash.

1014
The Pub / Did you ever wonder...
« on: October 13, 2015, 04:55:15 PM »
...if brewers ever release a beer as a giant inside joke thinking "I wonder if anyone will actually buy this?"


...and then you slap down your credit card...

1015



The real trick is pretty much exactly that.  Mash in the overlap range for long enough to give the beta time to work.  I use 149F for 75 minutes for most 'normal' strength beers and 90-120 minutes for high grav beers.
Enzyme content of the malt is a huge factor in determining the time and temperature of this overlap range, and is why is is so hard to extrapolate data from any experiment like this. Enzyme activity and denaturation are temperature-sensitive rates. In particular, the denaturation of enzymes have temperature dependant half life. So if you have more of a particular enzyme in one malt you can push the temp higher and still have some enzyme remaining at the end of the mash that hasn't yet been denatured.

It would be interesting to see how this experiment looks using Munich malt or something else with lower enzyme content.

1016
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: first time for everything...uugghhh!
« on: October 12, 2015, 09:43:12 PM »
I've been wondering if I've been fighting a mild persistent infection in my beers. My thoughts on using rubbing alcohol as a "nuclear" option for a few beers and see where that leads me.

With my brewery I really require a no-rinse sanitizer, unless I did all my sanitizing on the complete other end of the condo. With a no-rinse option I can tackle everything in the garage. Iodophor may be my eventual choice for a sanitizer, but I'd like to prove to myself that star-san isn't killing what's in my garage before I switch to a product that can stain.

If you do not want to use bleach and vinegar, you can use 12.5ppm iodophor.    Both solutions are no rinse and full spectrum.  I have been using 12.5ppm iodophor lately.
Iodophor isn't sporicidal (neither is alcohol, by the way). If you're looking for a truly "nuclear" option then bleach is the way to go.

One other point of note regarding iodophor is that it may degrade certain types of silicone. In the medical field iodophors aren't used on silicone tubing as a precaution. I don't know how many brewers use silicone tubing on the cold side, but I figured I'd put that out there.

Personally, I have yet to run into any issues with Star-San in my brewery. I have several spray bottles of both Star San and Iodophor floating around and I feel comfortable reaching for either one if needed.

1017
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 12, 2015, 09:07:22 PM »
I'm enjoying my first beer from Jon (Hoosierbrew). This was simply marked "IPA".

The beer is pale gold in color, and is crystal clear aside from some hop haze. The head is just a ring of white foam. Upon closer review, my glass is not as beer-clean as I would like, so the lack of head may be my fault. The aroma has citrus up front, followed by a big, dank cannabis note, as well as a hint of juniper in the background.

On the palate, I get fleeting notes of stonefruit and citrus, that quickly turns into a clinging, resinous hop character. Bittering is firm, but not harsh or abrasive. The fermentation character is clean, with no flaws, or any other notable yeast or ester character to speak of. The malt character is very low, and just lets the hops do their thing. There is also a hint of a gypsum/mineral water note. The finish is crisp and dry, As the hop resin starts to fade at the end you can pick out some fruit and pine notes that come back in, and maybe a low sulfur/onion note way in the back.

Carbonation was a bit low for this type of IPA. I think a bit more fizz would help boost the aroma a bit more, and might break up the strong resin punch a bit. But that's a minor quibble (and expected, Jon let me know that the carbonation wasn't fully dialed in yet, but he wanted to time his package so it wouldn't be sitting in a hot warehouse all weekend).

Overall, this is a damn nice IPA that I could easily drink in quantity. Great beer, Jon!

1018
Interesting post from the reddit subforum on this exbeeriment:

"If the sugars left are mostly dextrines, then the beer simply won't be sweet - I've made diy cycling hydration/nutrition mix with 60g/L maltodextrine, and this is really un-sweet; it's kind of somewhere between very dilute sugar solution and very dilute starch water, which I guess makes sense. I then add 30g/L fructose, and that's all you can taste. 9 points is less than 30g/L maltodextrine, so I'm really not surprised it barely has any flavour impact."

So maybe a high mash temp just leaves a load of tasteless dextrines that hydrometers detect better than taste buds.
That was exactly my thought when I was reading this. The yeast is going to eat up all the simple sugars that would taste sweet, and leave only the relatively flavorless dextrins behind. I quickly gave up on using maltodextrin in my extract batches because I never noticed a difference in the finished beer.

It would be interesting to see this xBmt repeated with a low attenuating yeast like Windsor. If you have a yeast that already leaves a bit more fermentables behind than others, maybe that would be enough to notice a flavor difference. I also wonder whether using a large amount of crystal malt would lead to a more noticeable difference as well.

1019
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Another Whirlpool IBU Thing
« on: October 12, 2015, 06:50:01 PM »
My Double IPA came out to 65. Tinseth had it around 90-100 IIRC.
Mine measured 98. Tinseth had 475 and Rager had 440. So Rager was quite a bit closer. Maybe you were using the wrong equation  ;D


1020
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: October 11, 2015, 08:34:46 PM »
For grist, how about Cologne malt?  It's definitely bready, kinda rich and it's a really nice compliment to pils.  Maybe use it as a substitute for your Vienna?
I'm planning on tackling the Helles style myself this winter and I'm planning on using Kolsch malt in the grist. I agree with the "super pilsner" description. Pilsner malt gives me dry pasta and cracker notes, but I get something closer to the inside of a baguette from a lot of Helles. Big breweries can have malt made to spec, so it stands to reason that they could be using something kilned just a hair beyond a typical pilsner malt.

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