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Messages - erockrph

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1006
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Starsan question... bear with me
« on: March 18, 2016, 02:34:10 PM »
To the OP. You only need to sanitize the surface of your fermenter. Filling it with diluted starsan is a complete waste. Like said above, use a designated 5 gal bucket to house your sanitizer. Swishing about a cups worth in your fermenter is plenty enough. It's all about contact, not volume.

I hear this but my concern is that I will not make "contact" with every little spot in a secondary or keg well enough to sanitize it properly.
This is where the foaming properties of StarSan trump its slightly narrower spectrum of antimicrobial activity. It's not just about making contact with your sanitizer, it is equally important to maintain contact throughout the full required contact time for that agent. StarSan will cling to those hard-to-reach areas because of it's foaming agent. With something like Iodophor, you can't assume that it is sanitizing the lid of your bucket fermenter (for example) unless every spot on the lid remains wet with Iodophor throughout the full contact time. You can't just spray/swish and let it stand vertically as the sanitizer will just drain off the surfaces that are not submerged fairly rapidly.

I'm not saying that any product or process is wrong. You just need to be sure that your sanitization procedure is appropriate for the product you are using.

1007
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: March 18, 2016, 01:01:24 AM »
I like that he has stuff that isn't just the usual "according to style" recipes. Those are much more up my alley than a basic ESB recipe similar to what I've brewed a bunch of times. This 3.5% IPA is a good example of that. I think my next one will be the Double Brown recipe posted here:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/03/lets-brew-wednesday-1954-whitbread_9.html

I was looking at that recipe also. What would you use for the invert sugar? Lyle's?
That's what I use. From what I understand the brewers invert sugar used in the UK is a bit different, but Lyle's is easy enough for me to get my hands on and is a close enough substitute as far as I know.

1008
Chest freezer plus temp control is a top option. The other is your own grain mill if you don't have one. I went with the mill first, since I have a basement that works well enough for fermentation temp control for the majority of my beers. Having your own mill leads to consistency in mash efficiency, and allows you to purchase unmilled grain in bulk.

1009
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Water
« on: March 17, 2016, 07:21:50 PM »
I have a fairly soft well, so I don't need to use RO to be able to build a water profile that suits the beers I brew. I simply start with tap water and adjust with salts/acids/baking soda to reach the ion profile and mash pH I'm shooting for.

1010
I mainly brew 3 gallon batches, and a 5-gallon keg gives me everything that a conical can except for the yeast harvesting. The best part is that I can set my PRV to 15 PSI at the tail end of fermentation and have a mostly-carbed beer when I jump it to my serving keg. For low-carbed styles, I have poured it immediately after jumping off the sediment.

1011
All Grain Brewing / Re: Here's a recipe, make a water profile
« on: March 17, 2016, 06:42:25 PM »
It seems there's 4 beers that would somehow need tested probably in separate tests:

Water would need to be treated to like 100ppm.

1.) Just CaCl2
2.) Just CaSO4
3.) Both CaCl2 and CaSO4  (50ppm split?)
4.) Neither

I don't currently have the resources to do the test.

I just made the OP to try and get folks to think about a water profile they would like to apply to this recipe and what their intended effect was.  Apparently not much interest or not many folks actually sit down and do this type of thing.
It is an interesting thought experiment, but it's not typically how I go about recipe design. I generally start with an idea, then build my recipe (and water salts are part of the recipe) based on my goal. That doesn't look like a recipe I'd typically design, so I didn't have a lot of thought on what I'd do with the water profile.

1012
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: March 17, 2016, 06:20:04 PM »
I can't rave enough about this beer. I need to brew more of Ron Pattinson's recipes.



1957 Whitbread IPA clone
I have brewed a coupe of Ron's recipes, and those were very tasty.
I like that he has stuff that isn't just the usual "according to style" recipes. Those are much more up my alley than a basic ESB recipe similar to what I've brewed a bunch of times. This 3.5% IPA is a good example of that. I think my next one will be the Double Brown recipe posted here:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/03/lets-brew-wednesday-1954-whitbread_9.html

1013
All Grain Brewing / Re: Here's a recipe, make a water profile
« on: March 17, 2016, 01:05:51 AM »
I know you said you were kidding about the actual brewing, but if you did I think the best test would include an un-adjusted distilled water profile (adding only H2PO4 to keep mash pH in the same range) as a control. It's hard to say what the added salts did unless you compare them to something without the addition.

1014
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: You Might Be A Homebrewer If....
« on: March 17, 2016, 12:54:01 AM »
Just heard this one today on Basic Brewing Radio and lol'd:

"When your wife asks you to mash some potatoes, and you heat up some strike water."

1015
Other Fermentables / Re: First Mead
« on: March 16, 2016, 05:56:40 PM »
looking at mead now with 100% orange blossom honey next...been bitten by the bug bee  ;D
So am I, mainly to keep for backsweetening purposes based on the discussion here. I came across some decent honey at $4 for a 1-lb jar at my local Job Lot, so I grabbed several pounds worth. That's half the price per pound that I pay for a 5-lb jar from my local apiary.

1016
The Pub / Re: podcasts
« on: March 16, 2016, 05:43:13 PM »
For homebrewing podcasts I listen to the following regularly:

Basic Brewing Radio
Experimental Brewing
The Sour Hour
Brewing with Style (formerly the Jamil show, formerly Can you brew it) - although this should really be a shorter show now that Scott and John Plise left

The homebrewing ones I listen to depending on the topic/guest:
BeerSmith
The Session
Brew Strong

Non-homebrew podcasts I listen to:
Star Talk Radio
Discovery (BBC World Service)

1017
Other Fermentables / Re: Bottling Carbing cider
« on: March 16, 2016, 05:05:46 PM »
As long as your cider is completely finished, and you are not back sweeting, bottle conditioning is fine. 3 volumes is on the higher side for standard longnecks.

I could definitely dial it back.  I could do 2 volumes.  I am just super nervous about exploding bottles.  It's been in secondary for 4 months after 1 month in primary.  I assume it's finished.
Regular longnecks in good shape should handle at least 3 volumes with no issues. I'd shoot for 2.5-2.7 volumes if you like a cider with some fizz to it.

1018
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: You Might Be A Homebrewer If....
« on: March 16, 2016, 04:59:57 PM »
You refer to garnish on your food as a "flameout addition".

1019
Kegging and Bottling / Re: May Have Overcarbed my Dubbel
« on: March 16, 2016, 03:34:49 AM »
I'd be surprised if you had any problems at 3.7 volumes in those bottles. I've done 3.5 for hefes in regular long necks before, and while I wouldn't do it again, I didn't have any issues, either.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


1020
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: When "hot" breweries get stale
« on: March 16, 2016, 01:04:51 AM »
This is really what the craft beer scene has turned into - everyone's always looking for the next big thing. Once someone hits on it, then everyone and their brother rush out to put their own spin on it. Once upon a time, most craft breweries has 4-6 regular beers and had one or maybe two rotating seasonals. Now, even the lynchpin beers of most brands get changed every few years, and 2/3 of their line are one-offs or limited-release. Far fewer breweries are saying "this is what we are" and setting anchor (pun intended) with a clearly identifiable portfolio of steady beers.

For example, once upon a time Otter Creek was my favorite brewery. They had a solid lineup of beers, including a fantastic APA, and a killer Porter. Ever since Long Trail took them over, 2/3 of their beers are either one-offs or seasonals, and over half are IPA's. None of their regular lineup that I'd been drinking for 15+ years are around any more. It's like that with more and more breweries nowadays.

This is the scene that the fickle craft beer drinkers have created. It's a shame, in my opinion.

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