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Messages - erockrph

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1096
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Radiating beer experiment
« on: February 12, 2016, 09:07:19 AM »
3 Mile IslandPA
Curie's Cream Ale
Chenobyl-hopped Pils

OK... we need to stop lol  ;D

1097
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: February 12, 2016, 08:55:12 AM »
brewing my house IPA early sunday morning.  going to try it this time with either 150/75 ppm CaSO4/CaCl or 100ppm each this time.  lately I'm finding in my IPAs, I don't like the minerally character and over the top bite in the finish that I attribute to the high sulfate.  sort of reminds me of Bass Ale and I don't like Bass Ale.
I'm with ya on that. I think that IPA's where you are pushing the flavor and aroma hops more than bitterness do just fine in the 150 ppm SO4 range. I think that's enough sulfate to clear your palate on the finish without getting that mineral bite.

I've actually been brewing a lot of my IPA's as extract-only beers without any mineral additions lately. My whirlpool is long enough as it is, so it's a nice time saver not to have to mash and to be able to have a very short boil.

1098
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: February 12, 2016, 03:19:57 AM »
What types of hopping rates are we talking here for your double-whirlpool? 1 oz / gallon on the flameout addition + 2 oz / gallon on the 120F? More, less?
3 oz/gallon at flameout and 1.5 oz/gallon at 120F. I might tweak that a bit in the future - I think I can lower the flameout addition a bit. I might also shorten up the flameout whirlpool next time. It's a work in progress at the moment.

1099
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: February 11, 2016, 01:03:49 PM »
That's cool Eric. So you can pick up the added aroma?  Is it really smooth bitterness?
It's still a little green (young, not in color), and my keezer is set pretty cold to double-duty as a lagering chamber right now, so I'm not ready to pass judgement on flavor or bitterness yet. But I will say that there is a big aroma coming through that I can only attribute to the hops used in the lower temp whirlpool. It would be interesting to see how it compares to a dry hop of the same quantity, but it's certainly at an acceptable level for an IPA to me as-is.

1100
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Low temp whirlpool
« on: February 10, 2016, 12:38:22 PM »
We've gotten results back from 6 brewers and 62 tasters.  VERY interesting results, too.  We'll present them on the podcast on 2/17.
Looking forward to hearing the results. The more data points, the better.

1101
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: February 10, 2016, 12:20:59 PM »

First pour of my "Double Whirlpool IPA". There is a large lamp about 5 feet directly behind the glass. Just a wee bit o' haze in this one.


"Double whirlpool" please do explain
Testing out some hypotheses proposed in the "Low Temp Whirlpool" thread. This beer has only two hop additions, one immediately after flameout for bitterness and flavor, and a second way down at 120F, with no dry hops. The 120F whirlpool is testing to see if you can retain more aroma than you might otherwise get from hot-side additions. Early results smell promising.

1102
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Low temp whirlpool
« on: February 10, 2016, 12:08:07 PM »
I just tapped my "Double Whirlpool IPA" last night. It still needs some time to finish carbing up, but the initial sample seems quite promising.

I brewed an IPA using only two hop additions. The initial one was a 60-minute flameout hopstand using Meridian and X-17. The second was after cooling to 120F, with a 60-minute hop stand using Vic Secret and more X-17. Since the three hops have rather distinct flavor and aroma profiles, it's easier to pick out which each addition is contributing to the finished beer. In particular, Vic Secret has a big passionfruit character that neither of the other hops has.

I was very pleased to find that the finished beer has a massive passionfruit aroma. I'd need to do a side-by-side to see how it compares to dry-hopping, but at the rate I'm using (5oz in 3 gallons for the 120F whirlpool, 1 ounce of which was Vic Secret) I'm pretty happy with the amount of aroma I'm picking up. I'm tempted to start whirlpooling at 120F instead of 170F for beers where I don't want IBU's from the late hop additions based on this result.


Good info. I may do some tinkering. I stopped steeping below ~ 160F because it seemed there was a bit of drop off in aroma, at least in my mind. So I arrived at 170-175F as my preference. May need to revisit soon. Thanks.
I wouldn't be surprised that the longer time and larger amounts I used helped make up for any reduced extraction at the lower temps. I'm pretty sure that there are several variables at play here.

1103
Beer Recipes / Re: Czech Amber Lager Recipe Help
« on: February 10, 2016, 11:59:20 AM »
I brewed this in November.  It came out awesome.

Polotmavé Speciální (Czech festbier)

10 gallons, 1.057 OG, 28 IBUs

11 lbs. Avangard Pilsner
9 lbs. Durst Turbo Vienna
7 lbs. Avangard Munich
10 oz. Weyermann Caravienne
6 oz. Weyermann CaraRed
5 oz. Weyerman CaraFa III

Mash 60 min at 148, add boiling water to 158°F for 15 min

Batch sparge to collect 14 gallons of wort

1 oz. Perle 90 min
1 oz. Spalt 90 min
0.9 oz. Hallertauer Mittelfrueh 30 min
1 oz. Spalt 10 min
1.4 oz. Saaz 5 min

looks very nice chumley - what yeast did you use though?

+1 - This recipe looks in the ballpark of a Maerzen. How does it compare in flavor?

1104
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Low temp whirlpool
« on: February 10, 2016, 11:50:15 AM »
I just tapped my "Double Whirlpool IPA" last night. It still needs some time to finish carbing up, but the initial sample seems quite promising.

I brewed an IPA using only two hop additions. The initial one was a 60-minute flameout hopstand using Meridian and X-17. The second was after cooling to 120F, with a 60-minute hop stand using Vic Secret and more X-17. Since the three hops have rather distinct flavor and aroma profiles, it's easier to pick out which each addition is contributing to the finished beer. In particular, Vic Secret has a big passionfruit character that neither of the other hops has.

I was very pleased to find that the finished beer has a massive passionfruit aroma. I'd need to do a side-by-side to see how it compares to dry-hopping, but at the rate I'm using (5oz in 3 gallons for the 120F whirlpool, 1 ounce of which was Vic Secret) I'm pretty happy with the amount of aroma I'm picking up. I'm tempted to start whirlpooling at 120F instead of 170F for beers where I don't want IBU's from the late hop additions based on this result.

1105
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: February 09, 2016, 09:24:23 PM »
First pour of my "Double Whirlpool IPA". There is a large lamp about 5 feet directly behind the glass. Just a wee bit o' haze in this one.

1106
Ingredients / Re: DIPA Hops - Mosaic, Cascade, Apollo
« on: February 08, 2016, 10:07:20 PM »
Resurrecting a dead thread, but I'm curious. I have some new Apollo from YVH I was planning on using in my next IPA. How do y'all feel about Apollo as a flameout/dry hop addition?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Personally, I've had some fantastic Apollo and some mediocre ones. I'm guessing that the end result depends on growing and harvesting conditions.

At its best, Apollo is like the perfect marriage of Amarillo and Columbus, plenty of tangerine with some dank resin to back it up. The mediocre Apollo I've had has none of the orange notes and is just nondescript "resin" without much depth to it.

1107
Beer Recipes / Re: rosehips in beer
« on: February 08, 2016, 06:45:13 PM »
Not to take things off on a tangent too far but...

- Most brewers make their acid additions to the mash water, but just because brewers may not usually adjust pH of a finished beer, that doesn't make it wrong to do so. Adding a touch of baking soda to a stout that tastes muddy, or a touch of lactic acid to a lager that tastes a bit flabby will likely improve the beer, sometimes greatly so. You can't go by the numbers, you have to go by your palate.

- Winemakers adjust acidity of their wine all the time. There's no reason it can't work for beer as well.

- Rose hips contain more malic acid than ascorbic acid (5-10 times more malic acid than apples). That would likely be a much bigger factor than their ascorbic acid content.

- Not all acids have the same flavor impact where tartness is concerned. Acids like citric and malic are quite tart (think lemons and sour patch kids, respectively). Other acids, such as lactic, produce a softer acidity. I have no clue where ascorbic fits in here, because it is rarely used as a flavorant. Again, I'd be willing to wager that the malic acid content of the hips would have a significantly greater flavor impact.

- Fruits are pretty commonly added to beer. If the added acidity was a problem, then there'd be no fruit beer.

I understand your reasoning, but I think you're making too many assumptions and extrapolations to make an accurate prediction on the end result. There's just no way to tell if it will be too tart without tasting it. And if it is, I doubt that the ascorbic acid would be the primary cause.

1108
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low pH with Best Pils Malt?
« on: February 08, 2016, 12:22:57 PM »
I've noted that initially low pH's tend to rise and initially high pH's tend to fall during the mashing period. They happen to point to a pH of around 5.4. It's a weird phenomena that I've also shared with AJ DeLange to see if we can figure out what's going on. Its probably something to do with the phosphate buffering system in malt.
That wouldn't surprise me at all. Calcium-Phosphate stability curves get pretty complicated. They are heavily influenced by concentrations of both sugar and protein in solution. This would obviously shift over time as the mash proceeds and more sugars are being put into solution.

1109
Beer Recipes / Re: rosehips in beer
« on: February 08, 2016, 12:14:04 PM »
rosehips have a lot of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) which will lower your pH.  Adding a fruit that lowers your pH is a bad thing in a secondary isn't it?  not unless you are pitching a stabilizer to counter it.  It may get you into a sticky situation.  But I am not as smart as I would like to be in the subject, so maybe not.  I can tell you I am not sure if you would want it in your mash, primary or secondary.
Why is lowering pH in secondary a bad thing? Almost any fruit would do this, as most are high in some combination of citric, malic or tartaric acid. As a matter of fact, I find that if the pH is too high, then that leads to an insipid fruit beer. A touch of acidity (often coming from the fruit itself) is enough to lift up the fruit character a bit and helps with the end product, in my opinion.

1110
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Omega Labs HotHead ale yeast
« on: February 08, 2016, 12:02:11 PM »
Is it a saison yeast? Says nothing of the sort in the link. 98F is insane. Kind of like Panama Jack's Workhorse yeast is apparently good up into the 80s as a clean ale yeast.

Also, I'm curious why they feel the need to state that they are not associated with Wyeast or White Labs... seems kind of obvious.

I think the statement is for clarity about the other language on the site comparing some of their products to WY and WL products. The Omega Labs folks have been critical of both WY and WL--particularly WL--for their quality control so that statement may also be a badge of honor for them.

This strain comes from farmhouse brewing but it isn't a saison strain in the sense that it is not Belgian nor is it used by any Belgian or French brewers to make saisons. If I remember the lineage correctly, this yeast was acquired from a Norwegian farm where it was basically a homebrewing strain passed around local families. The author of Larsblog obtained some samples and sent them to NCYC. NCYC in turn propagated the strain and OYL purchased the strain from NCYC to put into production.
Interesting that a Scandinavian strain would be so tolerant of high fermentation temps. Norway's record high is 96F, so this yeast could potentially go higher than any temp it was ever exposed to in "the wild".

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