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Messages - erockrph

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1216
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Mikkeller Spontanbeetroot
« on: October 28, 2015, 09:03:48 PM »
Just out of curiosty: how much are these Spontanmikkellers over at your end of the globe? That Spontanbasil was 15€ for a 750ml bottle, but I reckon it's actually a blend with Lindemans lambic, and hence not just any Mikkeller Spontan.
I thought I had read somewhere that he uses Girardin as his base lambic. I definitely get that funky Girardin Brett note on the nose with some of the beers in this series, but not all of them.

The SpontanSeaBuckthorn is an interesting one. There isn't much of a berry or fruit flavor/aroma on top of the usual lambic notes. But there is a sharp malic acid sourness on the middle of the tongue and some lingering tannic astringency. The lactic acidity seems towards the low side. The end result is tartness up front that drops off quickly and is balanced on the finish by the tannins. The acidity is more like Sour Patch Kids or Warheads (but not as strong as the latter), rather than lactic.

I think there were two ways to go with the Sea Buckthorn. The first is what Mikkeler has done here - back off on the lactic to keep the combo of malic and lactic from overpowering the palate. That leads to a better balance, but the acidity is dropping off a bit too quick. It's a little too tart up front and not tart enough on the back end.

The second way would be to go full throttle on the acidity, in the range of something like La Folie. I think the acidity would be a bit bracing at first, but the tannins would cut through and give some balance through the finish. At least that's my armchair quarterback take on it.

1217
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 28, 2015, 02:55:46 PM »
Yes, it's one aspect of vinous.  "Port" is another oxidation quality in that vein.
And the Muscat/Sauvignon Blanc note common in some NZ hops is yet another possible application of the term "vinous" in brewing.

1218
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Mikkeller Spontanbeetroot
« on: October 28, 2015, 05:30:13 AM »
Quote
You have convinced me to try the basil one, though. I haven't seen it yet, but I did pick up a bottle of the SeaBuckthorn, and I'm looking forward to trying that one out.
Just out of curiosty: how much are these Spontanmikkellers over at your end of the globe? That Spontanbasil was 15€ for a 750ml bottle, but I reckon it's actually a blend with Lindemans lambic, and hence not just any Mikkeller Spontan.
They're in the ballpark of $15 for a 375mL bottle. Sometimes a little more, sometimes a little less.

1219
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Shaking
« on: October 27, 2015, 05:16:23 PM »
Not really looking for any answers for myself. It was more of a think out loud thing. I was just curious if the standard rocking back and forth method was adequate to achieve saturation.
It's a rate thing rather than a quantity thing. By creating a large amount of foam you are maximizing surface area and allowing the O2 to diffuse in rapidly. Other methods will still get you there, but they will take a lot longer.

1220
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Experimenting with hops
« on: October 27, 2015, 05:13:34 PM »
I prefer to go the extract route for this because it is so much quicker. There's no mash, and a 15-minute boil is all you need. I'm brewing 4 single-hop batches later this week and I will be done in less time than a single all-grain batch.

Do you get adequate hop bitterness with only a 10minute boil?
If you use enough hops you do. And if you're taste-testing hops then you should be using plenty of late hops anyways.

1221
Beer Recipes / Re: lager recipe for lager-hater
« on: October 27, 2015, 03:13:07 PM »


Never saw much point to them besides being quaffable and beer.
You say this like it's a bad thing. There's a big difference between Bud Light and a good German Helles.

1222
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Blending beers with Acid beer
« on: October 27, 2015, 02:59:14 PM »
Bock/doppelbock would be interesting, as would a Helles. Any malty, but not sweet, style would probably be a good start.

1223
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Experimental Brewing podcast
« on: October 27, 2015, 02:51:29 PM »
Awesome! I'm finally caught up on my brewing podcasts after listening to all the NHC presentations, so I can definitely use some new podcasts for my commute.

Any idea what your format is going to be? Will it be guests, Q&A, you guys presenting on topics? Looking forward to hearing you guys.

1224
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Mikkeller Spontanbeetroot
« on: October 27, 2015, 09:30:39 AM »
If the less you use of an ingredient the better, then what's the point of using it?

I can't believe I'm the one saying this, but sometimes, less is more.

Look at it this way: you just made that special cream sauce to accompany a meal and the first thing everyone says upon tasting it is "Wow, I love brandy in cream sauce!".
Probably means you used too much brandy.
When they say "Hey, what's your secret ingredient, mine never tastes quite the same when I make it?", that means you hit the sweet spot :)

Basil in beer does work: I had a wonderful Basil Berliner Weisse at Borefts this year.
Agreed on the subtlety point, but I was thinking more of ingredients where the less you use the better because the "sweet spot" is actually zero.

You have convinced me to try the basil one, though. I haven't seen it yet, but I did pick up a bottle of the SeaBuckthorn, and I'm looking forward to trying that one out.

1225
Ingredients / Re: specialty malts for brown ale
« on: October 27, 2015, 09:10:59 AM »
What's your base malt? You could get some flavor from that by using some Vienna or Munich as some of your grist. Victory is probably a nice choice for a small speciality malt addition, too.

I am not doing a traditional brown. It will have a munich base so it will be plenty malty. I am just investigating one more specialty malt to throw in the mix but don't want to overdo it.
If you're not using roasted malts, then what's going to make it brown? A 100% Munich beer is going to be light amber in color at best.

1226
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First wort hopping and whirlpool
« on: October 27, 2015, 08:51:42 AM »
I dont think its a flip-switch situation. 170F boink, no AA... 171F boink, lots of AA. When I say that I chill to 170 I actually chill to 180 then shut the water off and it slids down to 175-170 before stabilized. I drop in the hops and set timer. If the temp hits 160 I hit the flame. With this method I get super flavor and aroma with no extra bitterness that I can notice. Would a lab prove me wrong? Dunno, I doubt it
I'm sure you'll get some additional measured IBU's, but the question is whether it is detectable by your palate rather than just at the lab. Maybe if you use a metric crap-ton of hops in a low IBU beer you might get enough to notice, but most real-world scenarios are likely to fall below the typical detection limit.

1227
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: soaking oak cubes in red wine
« on: October 27, 2015, 08:47:08 AM »
Quote
the wine will take up oxygen and "spoil"

I have made over 1200 gallons of wine, and have never had an oxidation issue from adding oak chips (which have a much higher surface area than cubes, thus more opportunity for oxidation)
I don't think the oxidation concern if from the oak itself, but rather from pouring the wine into another vessel in open air. It is the exposure to air that is the concern.

1228
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: October 27, 2015, 08:37:11 AM »
Thanks for the great review, Jim. This was my IPA for the BrewUnited competition, which had a limited ingredient list. You needed to use Pils, Munich, Flaked Wheat and 60L Crystal as your only malts, and needed to use exactly two hop varieties from a small list of choices.

Centennial was the only remotely IPAish hop on the list, so that is where the bulk of the hop character came from. I used a small addition of Northern Brewer at 60min to meet the 10% of the hop bill requirement, then I whirlpooled 6oz of Centennial at 195F for 45 minutes to get a moderate amount of additional IBU's while extracting flavor and aroma. There were 2oz of Centennial in the dry hop as well (3 gallon batch).

I never use Centennial in IPA's, nor do I typically use it as a single hop. That is mainly because so many commercial brewers use it, and I prefer to make stuff at home that I can't buy at the store. I was surprised at just how much dank/resin/pine I got out of it in addition to the usual C-hop citrus.

Jim, I'm not sure what the note was that you couldn't place, but I used CaraMunich III as my crystal and BRY-97 for yeast. Maybe it's one of those?

1229
Ingredients / Re: specialty malts for brown ale
« on: October 26, 2015, 04:15:44 PM »
What's your base malt? You could get some flavor from that by using some Vienna or Munich as some of your grist. Victory is probably a nice choice for a small speciality malt addition, too.

1230
Brett is what you may potentially have to worry about. It can create a biofilm that may allow it to survive your normal cleaning and sanitization regimens. I have heard of others using the same plastic fermenters for both clean and wild fermentations, but many brewers (inclusing myself) keep clean and wild plastics segregated in the brewery.

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