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Messages - erockrph

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1696
Beer Recipes / Re: First All Brett Beer
« on: May 05, 2015, 07:05:09 AM »
While I have no personal experience with an all-Brett beer, I have read/heard from several sour brewers that they ferment Brett at warm ale temps (68-72F). I think many wild beer brewers have come to the conclusion that the typical "Brett" character tends to come about from a primary Sacc fermentation that produces esters and phenolics that the Brett can convert into other flavor compounds. This explains why Brett-primary fermentations turn out so clean - they don't have much to work on to produce Bretty flavor compounds.

1697
Equipment and Software / Re: A smart-device for brewing
« on: May 05, 2015, 06:54:14 AM »
I do not see the advantage of just knowing the temperature continuously. I already know and record the temperature of my wort/beer at every important juncture, knowing any more than that is just more data that I wouldn't have use for.
+1
Agreed. Those brewers who are high-tech enough to have a need for continuous temperature information, either in the mash or during fermentation, already have a mechanism to control said temps in response to any fluctuations.

And at that price point, you're competing with Raspberry Pi-based controllers which are a lot more robust. It's not that this isn't a useful product, but I don't see a niche in the marketplace for this at this price point.

1698
Ingredients / Re: Malt Flavor: American vs. Belgian
« on: May 05, 2015, 06:45:26 AM »
That's good to know. I think I can use the method you do and really be able to have 4-5 batches worth of grains on hand at all times.

I personally think I can make 1 lb. of all the specialty grains i'd need last for a long time at the increments i'd need.

When scaled down my recipes need only 1-2 lbs. of base malts and between 0.05-0.2 lbs. of specialty grains.

What do you store in?
If they come in good-quality ziploc bags, I just leave it in those. Otherwise I move it to a 1-gallon ziploc storage bag. I've been meaning to get a couple of Gamma seals to use to store my bulk grains in 5-gallon buckets, but for the time being the grain stores just fine in the sack for a year or so.

1699
Good read, Marshall.

Follow up question for the group: I am likely going to forgo dryhopping in the future in favor of a whirlpool addition. I believe I get similar aromas from whirlpooling and dryhopping, but I get clearer beer from the whirlpool method.

Anyone else on a whirlpool kick? Or does the xBmt team want to tackle that one?
I whirlpool almost every beer with flavor additions, but I still dry hop some beers on occasion. I have been dry-hopping less and less, though. I haven't quite given it up on IPA's, but I may have to try it soon. I do think the character is different between the two, but the only time it really matters to me is a massively hopped beer where I want to layer both whirlpool and dry hops together.

1700
Ingredients / Re: Malt Flavor: American vs. Belgian
« on: May 05, 2015, 06:24:10 AM »
The most practical thing to do would actually just get my base malt in bulk from local place and order incremental values of my specialty/color/roast malts from someone like Keystone.

I plan on doing 1-1.5 gallon micro batches so it doesnt make sense to have to buy Lbs. of these grains when I may only need 0.05 lbs. at a time.
I brew smaller (2.5-gallon) batches myself, and I generally get a sack of base malt that is most appropriate to the styles I'm brewing the most, and buy my specialty grains in 1-lb increments regardless of how much I need. If stored well, specialty grains will easily last 2+ years. I've ended up accumulating a bit of a library of different malts to choose from, and outside of needing a particular strain of liquid yeast I can brew most recipes on short notice.

1701
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Law of partial pressures
« on: May 05, 2015, 06:00:46 AM »
If O2 diffused that rapidly, then I wouldn't feel like I was about to pass out every time I stick my head in my damn fermentation chamber...

1702
All Grain Brewing / Re: beating a herd of dead dry-hops
« on: May 05, 2015, 05:53:26 AM »
I'm a new brewer who recently read the "Hops" book, it mentioned addign hops post boil vs dry hopping..  I've read several articles on same..    https://byo.com/hops/item/2808-hop-stands   http://www.mrmalty.com/late_hopping.php and a thread on homebrew talk http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=278559 

I did a whirlpool hop add post boil on my last IIPA which is fermenting now, the Aroma is heavenly, hope it lasts....
I find that whirlpool hops last way longer than dry hops. Dry hops seem to fade in weeks to a month, but I've had IPA's with good hop flavor/aroma for 6 months or more when using lots of whirlpool/hop stand hops.

1703
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Spring 2015 Beer Swap
« on: May 05, 2015, 05:34:35 AM »
I have been experimenting with more tartness with that... A tiny bit on lactic seems to open it up a bit more. You think that might help it a bit?

Maybe. I like a tart Saison. I also like to mash like 5.2-5.25 pH to get a crisp, tart finish. Really helps IMO. Regardless, that was a tasty beer !
Was this 3711? I mash at 5.2 as well, and the resulting beer has a nice tart-citrus character. It also makes tart additions like hibiscus and currants work really well.

1704
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: FWH
« on: May 03, 2015, 08:01:44 PM »
I used to use it, but now I've moved to 60 min + hopstand ± dry hops for pretty much everything. I definitely felt the character of FWH was different than a 60-minute addition, but I never did a side-by-side myself to confirm it.

1705
Got it.  One more question.  Do you strain out the hops going into the fermentor?
Yeah, with the amount of hops I use, it's pretty much a necessity :) I brew 3 gallon batches, so I am able to just dump my kettle through a kitchen strainer if I'm using whole hops. If I'm using pellets, I have varying sizes of these that I pour through.

1706
All Grain Brewing / Re: Dry hop vs post boil
« on: May 03, 2015, 06:34:15 PM »
Thanks all..  Apologize for confusing question, very much appreciate the exceptional information and think I've found my answer..  My intent was let's say my receipt for a 60 min boil called for a hop add at 60 and 2nd at 30, then a dry hopping..  The total IBU was to be 100...    Soooo...  What (if anything) happens to my IBUs if I should use a whirlpool hop at post boil vice dry  hop.  Would those hops I added at 60 & 30 continue to add to total IBUs.....

Depends on the temp of your hop stand. Isomerization of alpha-acids slows down as the temperature drops. If you're hopstanding at 170F or so, the extra utilization from those early boil additions will be negligible. If you perform your hop stand at a higher temp, then you will probably gain some IBU's. Even then, 60-minute or longer additions won't add much more at that point (maybe 10% more IBU's, barely noticible). But a 30-minute or shorter addition may give quite a bit more than expected.

1707
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: DAP and beer color
« on: May 02, 2015, 10:01:15 PM »
Interesting. I wonder if this is pH-related, or if there's a chemical reaction going on that is causing this.

1708
The best way to increase hop flavor is to use a hop stand. Use just enough of a smooth bittering hop at 60 minutes to get your target IBU's, then add all your flavor hops after flameout once your wort gets down to about 170F. Stir the heck out of it, then let it steep at that temp for a half an hour (stirring occasionally) before chilling the rest of the way and pitching. You will be amazed at how much hop flavor you will get. There is no need for a hopback, this works way better.
Do you cover the kettle for the half hour 170 F rest?  It seems like the wort would cool to the 130s if uncovered.  Or do you give it a shot with the burner?
I brew indoors on my glass stovetop. I put the pot back on top of the hot burner and cover it in between stirs. It is generally still in the 150's after half an hour. I do try to minimize temp loss, but I'm not overly concerned about losing even 20 degrees or so.

1709
The best way to increase hop flavor is to use a hop stand. Use just enough of a smooth bittering hop at 60 minutes to get your target IBU's, then add all your flavor hops after flameout once your wort gets down to about 170F. Stir the heck out of it, then let it steep at that temp for a half an hour (stirring occasionally) before chilling the rest of the way and pitching. You will be amazed at how much hop flavor you will get. There is no need for a hopback, this works way better.

1710
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer in Brazil
« on: May 01, 2015, 05:18:14 PM »
I had the cachasa via the caipirinha cocktail the Brazilians love (or I think that's what's in it). My head still hurts thinking about it. I may or may not have had too many.
Caipirinha is one of my all -time favorite drinks. I will take a good caipirinha over a mojito or margarita any day. Now I have a craving for some churrascaria...

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