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Messages - erockrph

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31
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Rube Goldberg Part Two
« on: April 24, 2016, 04:09:49 PM »
Congrats, Jim!

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


32
All Grain Brewing / Re: Help With Saison and My Water Profile.
« on: April 24, 2016, 12:02:38 PM »
As far as I'm concerned, the only thing bicarbonate in your brewing water is good for is making you use more acid for pale beers. I like my saisons with relatively low mineral amounts. I target 100ppm Cl and about 50ppm Sulfate. The key is shooting for a lower pH. I mash my saisons at 5.3 and have considered going closer to 5.2. That bit of extra tartness really makes the flavor brighter.

If I had your water, I'd probably use RO water for this style.

33
It turns out another place has opened, looks to be one six blocks up the street. Periodic Brewing, the logo is "Pb". I get it! IIRC there was a nano in planning when we visited. Some friends from MI were just at Periodic.
https://www.facebook.com/periodicbrewing/
I appreciate the logo, but I am hesitant to consume anything produced by "Pb" brewery. Paint Chip Porter, anyone?

34
On a side note, when I used to bottle, I would only use the temperature of the beer at bottling time for my number.  Got great carbonation to style with this.  Granted, I was mostly bottling around 68F which is pretty darn close to most peak fermentation temps so there could be negligible difference.

I think in reality the only time there would be a huge difference compared to actual beer temps is if you cold crash prior to bottling and are trying to use the cold-crash temp instead of the temp at the end of fermentation in your priming calculations.

35
Because that determines the estimated amount of CO2 remaining after fermentation.
To go into a bit more detail, CO2 solubility is based on temperature. Warmer liquid holds less CO2. Once active fermentation is done, there is no more CO2 being produced by the yeast. So at that point any CO2 lost from solution as it warms will not be replaced even if the temperature drops after that point. The warmest temperature reached represents the point where there's the lowest CO2 concentration in the beer and is the best estimate of the amount of CO2 that is actually in the finished beer.

36
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry hopping during active fermentation
« on: April 23, 2016, 10:39:31 AM »
Bubbling CO2 through beer is a well known technique that can scrub aroma and flavors, so why not hops?  It may not reduce IBU but I'd bet it can remove some volatile compounds from dry hopping.  If your fermentation is almost done, it may not remove much in practice.
Good point. The question is how much it would actually remove in practice. I have an old keg of IPA I've been meaning to dump to make room for some new batches. Maybe I'll throw a couple of ounces of hops in the keg for a few days then go through some purge/degas cycles to see what happens. It's probably more extreme than what would happen during fermentation, but it might approximate a "worst case scenario" upper limit.

37
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry hopping during active fermentation
« on: April 23, 2016, 09:36:05 AM »
I always wait until fermentation has completed.  That way the CO2 does not carry the hop aroma out of the fermenter as it escapes and instead stays in contact with the beer.
I'm going to call BS on this as an old brewer's tale that just makes no sense to me whatsoever. If the hop oils are in solution, then there is little risk of CO2 in gas form removing it from the beer. Hop aroma compounds aren't some magical substance that evaporates rapidly at room temperature (after it is already dissolved in solution, mind you) if you look at it the wrong way.
I'm not so certain. I think I've had it happen.
And it was specifically from CO2, as opposed to some other mechanism like hop oils sticking to yeast in suspension and falling out? I'm not saying that dry-hopping during fermentation might give less hop aroma, I'm just suspicious of the claim that it is because of CO2 blowing it out.

38
I would be careful in defining "negative effect". I think that is yeast-strain dependent, and depends on what effect you are looking for (more esters, less esters, attenuation, etc.).

If you are fermenting in a vacuum, how do you get oxygen to the yeast for replication?

39
Any insight into their mash schedule? Do they step mash?

Do you know what base malt(s) they use?

40
Other Fermentables / Re: sima Finnish fermented lemonade
« on: April 23, 2016, 07:32:22 AM »
I love sima! I included a recipe for it in my book so I've made many, many batches and a whole lot of variations. I like to just refer to it as fermented lemonade. I make it with lemons, sugar and champagne yeast. You can also riff by adding other fruits, like strawberries or raspberries or blueberries, or herbs or spices (lemon & lavender are killer together). Or by making it with other citrus fruits - there are a TON of variations. I've served it at many public events and the keg always kicks fast, especially in the summer. It was originally made with honey and bread yeast or other native yeast (meaning not intentionally innoculated) but it's commonly made with sugar and commercial yeast these days (bread or other). Raisins were originally used in this & many other beverages (kvass, off the top of my head) - they would sink initially & float once fermentation/carbonation occurred - kind of a natural indicator of when it was ready (no hydrometers or PET bottles in the old days, right?). I usually keg my sima but use plastic if I'm doing batches less than 1.75 G (the size of my smallest kegs). It's a super easy & darn tasty beverage, especially for warmer months.
Thanks for the input, Mary! When you keg, do you force-carbonate? Or is this more along the lines of a homemade ginger beer where the fermentation is intended to create the carbonation?

41
Equipment and Software / Re: Brewing Software - Recommendations?
« on: April 23, 2016, 07:29:35 AM »
I guess I feel the same way in that I haven't tried any others so I don't know what Steve means by the workflow of brewing.
I feel that once I click the brew button, I should get s page that has all the data presented. Not a page that tells me to clean my gear and mill my grains followed by a mash only page, etc. if I can enter a beer on one screen, let me brew a beer on one screen.
I see. I just use the recipe calculator and print the recipe.
Same here. I write down all my numbers on the recipe sheet and then key it into the brew log later. I'm too much of a slob to trust myself using electronic devices while brewing.

42
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry hopping during active fermentation
« on: April 23, 2016, 07:21:55 AM »
I always wait until fermentation has completed.  That way the CO2 does not carry the hop aroma out of the fermenter as it escapes and instead stays in contact with the beer.
I'm going to call BS on this as an old brewer's tale that just makes no sense to me whatsoever. If the hop oils are in solution, then there is little risk of CO2 in gas form removing it from the beer. Hop aroma compounds aren't some magical substance that evaporates rapidly at room temperature (after it is already dissolved in solution, mind you) if you look at it the wrong way.

43
Beer Recipes / Re: "Juicy" IPA
« on: April 21, 2016, 06:04:05 PM »
I brewed this last night with a few changes from my original recipe. I changed the mineral profile to 80ppm Cl, 150ppm SO4, and no added Na. I just need some dryness in the finish in my IPAs. I also ran a little low on torrified wheat, so I made up the difference with some extra oats. It ended up being 12.5% wheat and 9.5% oats in the end. I also used WLP013 since my smack pack of 1469 was DOA.

My only boil addition was hop shot, and I went with the 120 F whirlpool temp. What I noticed was that as I chilled to 120F and saw the cold break start to separate out, was that the wort was super clear. It wasn't until maybe 10-15 minutes into my hop stand where the wort assumed the bright orange juice appearance I was expecting.

That leads me to think that a lot of the haze is indeed coming from the hops. Some was coming from the re-suspended break material as well, since the filtered wort (run through a 75-micron screen) in the fermenter was still hazy but not as much as it was during the whirlpool. I'm sure the dry hops will make it even hazier once I get to that point.

One other interesting note - I'm not typically a scum-skimmer, but the wort was fully covered with a thick, dark-grey foam before it hit a boil. I scooped it off into a pitcher, and 2 hours later it was still the consistency of a thick gray smoothie. Interesting stuff.

44
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Current thoughts on hefe strains
« on: April 21, 2016, 05:49:35 PM »
I stay away from 3068 only because it reminds me of just about every commercial hefe I've ever tried, and when I brew I want it to taste a bit different from what I can pick up at the store (sort of how I rarely use Centennial or Simcoe in my IPAs). I've settled on WY3638 for my hefe's. I pick up a bit more sweet spice on the phenolics. It's not vanilla, cinnamon or anise, but it's something in the same ballpark. It complements the clove and banana quite well. It's good in a hefeweizen, but even better in a dunkelweizen.

45
The Mr Beer kits already have hops in the extract, and should have the right balance of bitterness. Any hops you're adding would be mainly for flavor. What I would do (and I have done something very similar with this same exact kit) is add the DME to 1/2 gallon of water (instead on only 4 cups) before you boil it. Add 1/2 oz of hops as it hits a boil, and boil for 5 minutes. Then add the LME to the hot wort you just boiled. Use 1 quart less cold water in the fermenter to make up for the extra quart you boiled.

Good luck! Should make for a tasty brew.

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