Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - erockrph

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 396
31
Beer Recipes / Re: 'Black witbier'
« on: June 01, 2017, 08:36:54 AM »
I like the concept, but I think you might be trying to shoehorn too much into one beer, and will have a hard time hitting the balance point you're looking for.

Instead of a witbier yeast, have you considered using a neutral ale yeast and trying this as a spiced brown ale? That might give you closer to the flavors you're looking for, even though the initial "Aha!" moment was for a black witbier.

32
The Pub / Re: Rebel Brewer Closing Retail and Warehouse
« on: June 01, 2017, 06:47:50 AM »
It always bugged me why the local shop can't sell me increments of a pound when they are measuring out my grain bill. ...why I can get an increment but have to pay by the full pound.
That may be fine when you're at a low enough volume where you weigh to order, but if you're chugging through inventory then it would be way more efficient to break a whole sack down into 1#/5#/10# increments at once.

33
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Whirlfloc + Gelatin vs Gelatin alone
« on: May 31, 2017, 08:31:45 AM »
I may be wrong, but my understanding is that the purpose of Whirlfoc is not to clarify the final beer.  It's to settle trub in the kettle before transfer to the fermenter.
The proteins whirlfloc binds to stay in the beer if you don't use it.  Without whirlfloc (or other finings) and without gelatin the beer is quite cloudy.

I pour everything from the kettle into the fermenter. So, whether I clarify before fermentation or after doesn't really matter to me. Clarifying before and after  doesn't seem to be necessary.
In my experience, whirlfloc gives me a much fluffier trub in the primary fermenter that sticks together. With no whirlfloc the beer actually tends to clear a little bit quicker. I'm guessing that without whirlfloc, there are more/smaller flocs and this might give more surface area to help clear the beer quicker. The downside to skipping whirlfloc is that the trub kicks up a lot more easily and is harder to keep out of transfers.

are you doing an intense whirpool by chance? Sometimes a real strong whirpool can shear the big chunks of trub that whirloc creates which can cause this.
Just a few hard spins with a spoon.

Here's a picture I took a while back comparing two batches. I forgot the whirlfloc in the left jug. This is the dregs left over after racking. the jug on the left is cloudier because the trub I kicked up during racking hadn't settled back down yet.


34
Ingredients / Re: Essential German hops
« on: May 31, 2017, 06:52:37 AM »
This is slightly tangental, but I got some KILLER Sterling from Hop Heaven this year, with a strong Saaz like character. My last couple of lagers have really stood out because of that hop flavor.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
I have them growing in my backyard and they make a great pilsner. Some batches I add some saaz as a dry hop and some I use only sterlings. Two weeks ago I brewed a three gallon batch of imperial pilsner with 7 ounces of sterlings that I plan to dry hop with saaz; maybe wakatu.
My homegrown Sterling (and many commercial ones I've gotten) can get kind of lemonadey as a late hop. This particular batch leans a lot more towards that classic Saaz character then the citrus when used late.

35
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Whirlfloc + Gelatin vs Gelatin alone
« on: May 31, 2017, 05:58:29 AM »
I may be wrong, but my understanding is that the purpose of Whirlfoc is not to clarify the final beer.  It's to settle trub in the kettle before transfer to the fermenter.
The proteins whirlfloc binds to stay in the beer if you don't use it.  Without whirlfloc (or other finings) and without gelatin the beer is quite cloudy.

I pour everything from the kettle into the fermenter. So, whether I clarify before fermentation or after doesn't really matter to me. Clarifying before and after  doesn't seem to be necessary.
In my experience, whirlfloc gives me a much fluffier trub in the primary fermenter that sticks together. With no whirlfloc the beer actually tends to clear a little bit quicker. I'm guessing that without whirlfloc, there are more/smaller flocs and this might give more surface area to help clear the beer quicker. The downside to skipping whirlfloc is that the trub kicks up a lot more easily and is harder to keep out of transfers.

36
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Mangrove Jacks French Saison strain
« on: May 30, 2017, 08:07:34 AM »
Has anyone used it?  How does it compare to Belle Saison or WY3711?

I'm planning on making Drew's Springtime in Amarillo saison, and whilst I can source the the MJ yeast at my LHBS, I'd have to order online for the WY3711.

I just brewed a saison with that about three weeks ago, pitching two packets into a five gallon batch and fermenting at 80 degrees. Grain bill was 86% pilsner, 7% Munich, 7% white wheat, and a touch of Carafa Special III, with a single infusion rest of 149 degrees with batch sparge.

Fermentation was fast, vigorous, and otherwise uneventful. It attenuated out as far as predicted by my software and given my grain bill and mash parameters. I kegged the beer after 8 days, and have been drinking it for a few days now. In my first impressions, the beer has a nice fruity flavor and aroma, with a pleasant tartness alongside.

I brewed with WLP565 (White Labs Belgian Saison I) previously; my recollection is that it had more of the spicy and fewer of the fruit notes as compared to the MJ strain. That said, I don't know how MJ would behave differently at a lower temperature (in the mid-70's, say, rather than the lower 80's). Anyone have experience with different fermentation temperatures on that?

Details on the recipe are here: https://andybrews.com/2017/05/12/thumbspike-saison-2-0/

and preliminary impressions are here: https://andybrews.com/2017/05/28/big-batch-update/
Fruity, tart, less spicy... Sounds a whole lot like 3711 and Belle to me

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


37
Ingredients / Re: Essential German hops
« on: May 29, 2017, 08:48:37 PM »
This is slightly tangental, but I got some KILLER Sterling from Hop Heaven this year, with a strong Saaz like character. My last couple of lagers have really stood out because of that hop flavor.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

38
I brewed a maple wine several years back. It was around 1.150 OG and finished very sweet around 1.050. Frankly, the acid level was pretty low in the finished wine. This was early on in my mead brewing experience, and I wasn't familiar with adding acid blend to the finished product. That's a regret, because I think it could have balanced out the high sweetness level a bit.

It's not really an apples to apples comparison with what you made, but I wouldn't expect much acidity from the sap on its own. Contamination is certainly a possibility.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


39
Other Fermentables / Re: First Mead
« on: May 29, 2017, 12:24:11 PM »
I agreee that strawberries are tough. The time I tried a strawberry melomel I used 3 lb/gallon pre-ferment and another 3 lb/gallon post-ferment. It still was lacking in strawberry character in the end. I did find that adding some acid helped boost the strawberry note, but still not enough.

I'm a melomel guy myself, and I really like blackberries, raspberries and currants. Sadly, it looks like I'm going to lose my black currants to mildew yet again this year. I might try a ginger-lime mead along the lines of my ginger-beer recipe for my next one. I'd really like to brew a golden raspberry mead, but it will be tough/expensive to acquire enough of those for even a small batch.

As far as SNA goes, I have been using a mix of Fermaid K and DAP divided into 4 additions roughly at day 0,1,3 and 5. I just picked up some Fermaid O and I will be using that in my next few meads instead of the Fermaid K/DAP mixture.

40
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Beer for curry?
« on: May 29, 2017, 11:16:14 AM »
I usually get a kingfisher, a lager, when I go to Indian restaurants and it goes well. IMO IPA's don't go well with any food that you want to have normally functioning taste buds and aroma receptors for. Also, any beer 6%abv  tends to be too filling for me with food.
I go the kingfisher route as well. I tend to go with same-nationality beers when eating ethnic food. It just makes it more authentic for me, even if there may be better beer options available. I drink Kirin Ichiban with sushi, Zywiec with kielbasa & pierogies, Negra Modelo with Mexican, Warsteiner Dunkel with schnitzel, etc.

That said, I also think a pale lager in general is a good choice for most spicier, full-flavored food. It is a good palate cleanser, and a light grain character is a nice complement without getting in the way.

41
Beer Recipes / Re: Can't Decide on Hop Bill – Need Help
« on: May 29, 2017, 10:29:57 AM »
Simcoe-Amarillo-Citra at flameout. Open your Apollo and take a deep whiff. If it smells like tangerine and/or cannabis, add it at flameout with the others and bitter with Warrior. If it doesn't smell like much, or just like grass, then bitter with that.

Apollo has been a bit of an enigma for me as far as hops go. I've had some amazing hops that have a great tangerine character with a touch of dank, but more typically they seem to be very mild in flavor. Either way, I like it a lot for bittering.

42
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Buying in bulk
« on: May 17, 2017, 10:14:46 AM »
I brew about one or two 2.5 gallon batches a month, but I still buy everything in bulk with rare exceptions. Most of my brewday are on short notice, and I have no real LHBS, so it helps to have a small brewshop in my basement.  A sack of base malt is doable, but a bit much for my needs. I usually keep one or two 10# bags on hand of the ones I use the most, and 2-5# of my usual specialty malts. I do like 4oz bags of hops like Farmhouse sells, but my most common ones  I still buy by the pound. I have about 20 packets of dry yeast on hand, too...
Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
Slightly OT but do you find 2.5G to yield enough for the time invested?  I have been considering doing some large beers but scaled to 2.5G but unsure if it is worth it.  My free time is rare.
I only drink 4-5 beers a week on average. I'm actually considering going down to 1.75 gallons, since I still end up dumping the tail end of many 2.5 gallon batches to free up kegerator space. YMMV, based on your consumption.

43
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Buying in bulk
« on: May 16, 2017, 04:12:11 PM »
I brew about one or two 2.5 gallon batches a month, but I still buy everything in bulk with rare exceptions. Most of my brewday are on short notice, and I have no real LHBS, so it helps to have a small brewshop in my basement.  A sack of base malt is doable, but a bit much for my needs. I usually keep one or two 10# bags on hand of the ones I use the most, and 2-5# of my usual specialty malts. I do like 4oz bags of hops like Farmhouse sells, but my most common ones  I still buy by the pound. I have about 20 packets of dry yeast on hand, too...

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


44
All Grain Brewing / Re: IPA hopping technique survey/poll?
« on: May 11, 2017, 12:59:49 PM »
I make IPA a few different ways. My favorite is with a flameout addition only with a long, hot whirlpool. For others it is 60 minutes, plus whirlpool, plus dry hops.

I use a massive amount of hops (4+ ounces per gallon in whirlpool and 2 oz/gallon dry hops), but I've had issues with muddy/grassy/unpleasant hop character on and off. I'm still been playing with different variables to try to isolate the best approach for my tastes, but I'm not there yet.

45
Beer Recipes / Re: Multi grain lager
« on: May 10, 2017, 12:13:59 PM »
Spelt is pretty mice in multigrain bread, although i don't know if I'd be able to pick it out in a lager.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 396