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Messages - erockrph

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31
Ingredients / Re: How many ounces of hops in your American IPA?
« on: March 06, 2017, 08:08:01 PM »
I rarely brew the same IPA twice, but my best uses 10.5 ounces in a 90-minute hot whirlpool (starting right at flameout), with 6.5 ounces of dry hops. I brew 2.5 gallon batches, so double that for a 5 gallon batch (that would be 21 oz in the whirlpool and 13 oz dry hops).

That said, there is a diminishing return on hops, and you also run the risk of harsh grassiness with too much hop material. I've been playing with different temperature steeps, shorter steeps, no dry hops. I don't think you need 5+ ounces per gallon to nail an amazing IPA, but it certainly works.

32
Ingredients / Re: Bulk Hops, now that NikoBrew is closed
« on: March 06, 2017, 07:38:33 PM »
Hop heaven, Farmhouse, YVH, Hops Direct and Freshops are all excellent sources of hops in bulk at decent prices

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


33
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Top 3 - Bottom 3
« on: March 06, 2017, 11:36:23 AM »
My best 3:

Grain mill - I'm perfectly happy with my Barley Crusher, but that's not to say that it's the specific brand that I'm attached to. My efficiency was all over the place until I started milling my own grain

Fermenting kegs - I'm always looking for ways to make my brewing more simple, and fermenting in kegs makes my life easier and I feel that my beer is better to boot. That's a win-win for sure.

Bucket filters - http://www.dudadiesel.com/choose_item.php?id=fs5 - When you hop as heavily as I do, this is a huge help

As far as worst 3 goes, I have to say that just about everything served its purpose if nothing else than a learning experience as I went along. There's nothing that jumps out for me as a big fail. And that's largely due to coming to this forum so early in my brewing career.

34
The Pub / Re: How did you pick your forum name?
« on: March 04, 2017, 02:03:46 PM »
Erock is a nickname I picked up from a bandmate in college, and R.Ph. is the abbreviation for Registered Pharmacist (my profession). It has become my standard handle on internet forums over the years.

35
All Things Food / Re: Huevos Rancheros
« on: March 04, 2017, 12:30:54 PM »
Nice! That's a favorite dish of mine. It's great when you want something quick to throw together. I usually have mine over black beans with a toasted quesadilla. It's a staple "working dad dinner" in my household.

36
All Things Food / Re: Looking for a good ginger beer recipe
« on: March 04, 2017, 08:07:42 AM »
The passionfruit soda sounds good.   Jarritos soda has some great flavors and pretty much started us on making different kinds.   It is fun and easy.  As my daughter says, you just take juice and carbonate it. It’s not much more than that.  So far we have made lemon-lime, pineapple, grapefruit and ginger ale.  I think we are going to make tamarind soon.
 
Are you still carbing by shaking at 30 psi?  I think I’m giving up naturally carbing because its not worth it, especially with citrus juice based beverages.   I was planning on ordering a few more caps too so I can have multiple bottles instead taking up one of my taps by kegging it.

Sorry for the derail.  To bring it back you could make a blueberry ginger ale.  Blueberries go well with ginger. Are the IKEA syrups made from all fruit?

The IKEA concentrates are more syrup than a straight fruit concentrate. The Blueberry one contains blueberry juice concentrate, water, sugar, citric acid, and artificial blueberry flavor. It still tastes pretty close to "real" blueberries to me - sort of like blueberry pie filling. I'm not sure if the lingonberry concentrate or elderflower concentrate contain artificial flavor or not. Basically, it makes the cut for a soda ingredient for me, but I wouldn't use it in a beer or mead.

The SNS method of carbonation is working pretty well for me. I still need to dial in the exact amount of carbonation I like, and see if keeping it under refrigeration for a couple of extra days changes the carbonation mouthfeel at all. 20 PSI gives fine, champagne-like bubbles, but isn't quite prickly enough on the tongue to stand up to the fruit-heavy sodas. 30PSI is closer to Alka-Seltzer - lots of big, burp-inducing bubbles. I'm wondering if letting it sit longer may help keep all the carbonation from rushing out so fast on the initial pour. Next batch will target 25 PSI to see if that splits the middle.

I basically hit the half-full bottle with CO2 to pressure, shake until it goes soft, then repeat. Once it stops getting soft after a 30-second shake, I throw it in the fridge for a day. If it's still firm the next day, then I know it's at a stable carbonation and I taste-test.

Blueberry-ginger sounds pretty nice, maybe with some lemon zest in the ginger syrup. I'll put that on the list :)

37
All Things Food / Re: Looking for a good ginger beer recipe
« on: March 02, 2017, 07:45:35 PM »
I would also be interested to hear if you try out the concentrates you mentioned.

I'm enjoying this one as we speak:

1/4 cup Da Fruta Passionfruit Concentrate
4 packets True Lime (~juice of 1/2 lime)
70g Turbinado sugar
18oz water

The Da Fruta concentrate recommends a 1:7 dilution with water. This is a little less than that, but with some lime to make up the difference. I think the sweetness is spot-on. I don't get any of the lime. This is basically like drinking sweetened, carbonated passion fruit juice. And there's not a damn thing wrong with that.

Next time, I will up the ratio of lime to passionfruit. I will try to get some real limes and include the zest as well. Drinking this, I think passionfruit lemonade would be amazing. If you like passionfruit, I highly recommend picking up some Da Fruta concentrate and playing around with it yourself. The flavor isn't quite as intense as fresh fruit, but I couldn't imagine dealing with the real deal in any quantity. They run me 3 bucks a pop, and you maybe get an ounce of juice from them.

I feel like I'm really starting to hit my stride with the soda thing. I'm finally getting a handle on the carbonation. And I've found a reliable sweetness level (120g per liter in an acidic beverage, to my tastes). It's getting really fun and easy to crank out a batch. I think I'm going to spring for a few extra carb caps so I can start bringing 20oz bottles to work for lunch, and keep a pipeline of a few batches going.

I have this laying around from IKEA, so something blueberry-lemony is probably up next:

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/10296015/

I haven't tried the blueberry yet, but the lingonberry one is pretty nice.

38
All Things Food / Re: Looking for a good ginger beer recipe
« on: February 28, 2017, 08:59:43 AM »
My latest batch finally hit the carbonation level I was shooting for, and I think I've finally hit gold. Here's the details:

100 g diced fresh ginger
60 g turbinado
60 g light brown sugar
12 oz water

This was brought up to a simmer for just over an hour. Once it cooled enough to handle, I poured it through a strainer, and mashed it a bit with the back of a spoon to squeeze out as much as I could. I juiced a lime over this as a filter bed, and sparged the while thing with another 12 ounces of cold water to try to get every last drop of flavor. This got topped off to 1 liter and force-carbed.

Once this finally got carbed up, I knew I finally nailed this. The prickly carbonation takes you right into a deep, lingering ginger heat. Underneath the heat is this great, fresh ginger flavor balanced by a touch of lime and just enough acidity. There is some molasses-y brown sugar flavor, but I think the 50-50 mix with turbinado is the right balance to keep it from being too strong in that area.

It is a sweet soda, but not too much for my tastes (I grew up in a Pepsi household, and this is in a similar ballpark). I would like to try this with a bit less sugar to see how that compares. But otherwise, everything in this recipe is about perfect to my taste buds. That fresh ginger flavor is something I've never gotten from a commercial ginger beer.

As always, I'll keep this thread going as I brew new batches. I think I'm only about one or two batches away from determining a Gold-version recipe. Big thanks to Delo for the simmering suggestion. That made all the difference. Dried ginger was all heat with little flavor, and warm steeping brought a lot of flavor with little heat.

Side note: I've come to the realization that I can force carb way faster if I leave more headspace. It's almost like making a SNS starter in that regard - add CO2, then shake the snot out of the whole thing. I need to start brewing my 1L batches in 2L soda bottles.

39
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« on: February 27, 2017, 09:10:39 AM »
Of the three the only one I still haven't tried is Lagavulin...I don't know if the Ron Swanson character made it so popular that it sells before I find it or what.

Yeah, I love Laphroaig, too. Awesome stuff. But Lagavulin is pretty sublime IMO, too. And I bet 'Ron Swanson' drove up the interest and maybe the price a bit.
I highly recommend Talisker if you like the peatiest/smokiest Islay malts. The distillery is on the coast of the Isle of Skye, and must have a similar ocean climate. The character is very similar to something like Lagavulin. Talisker doesn't seem to get as much attention as the distilleries on Islay, but it is right up there with them if that's your type of Scotch.

40
Kegging and Bottling / Re: 3 tap kegerator
« on: February 27, 2017, 08:49:24 AM »
I have an actual 3-tap kegerator that is a really, really tight squeeze for 3 kegs as-is, and it is bigger than any dorm fridge I've ever seen. Depending on the compressor location, you might have a hard time fitting even one 2.5 gallon keg in a dorm fridge, let alone three 5-gallon kegs.
What's the make and model of your fridge?

This project might be a long shot, but I'm hoping to make it happen.

This is the one I have:

http://beermeistersupplies.com/beer-dispensing/kegerators/homebrew/triple-tower-with-black-door-homebrew-value-line-no-kegs-included.html

By all means, don't let me talk you out of your project. Half the fun is getting there, which is why most of us homebrew in the first place :)
Thanks! It doesn't give the make and model number of the fridge, but it does give the dimensions which are very helpful.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
I've heard that Beermeister rebadges their fridges, but I have no idea what the equivalent manufacturer and model number is.

41
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: February 26, 2017, 01:24:01 PM »
I have use different strains from what I'm brewing with and found a difference of 4 points between the FFT and the actual finishing gravity.  That was for a 1968 (batch, 1.012) vs US05 (FFT, 1.008) test. 

I guess it all depends on what you are looking for.  If you want to know when you are 3-5 points from finishing gravity (as in the spunding in the keg situation) then it would seem that you need the same strain.  If you just need to know if you have reasonably fermentable wort (as in the stuck ferment situation), then it would seem like the strain would be largely irrelevant.

Agreed!
Me too!

42
Kegging and Bottling / Re: 3 tap kegerator
« on: February 26, 2017, 12:37:20 PM »
I have an actual 3-tap kegerator that is a really, really tight squeeze for 3 kegs as-is, and it is bigger than any dorm fridge I've ever seen. Depending on the compressor location, you might have a hard time fitting even one 2.5 gallon keg in a dorm fridge, let alone three 5-gallon kegs.
What's the make and model of your fridge?

This project might be a long shot, but I'm hoping to make it happen.

This is the one I have:

http://beermeistersupplies.com/beer-dispensing/kegerators/homebrew/triple-tower-with-black-door-homebrew-value-line-no-kegs-included.html

By all means, don't let me talk you out of your project. Half the fun is getting there, which is why most of us homebrew in the first place :)

43
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: February 26, 2017, 12:24:37 PM »
Same species, not same strain. I couldn't imagine brewing a batch with 3711, then pitching a packet of Windsor for my FFT. They wouldn't finish anywhere near each other. I would think that the most applicable results would be with the strain you are pitching.

Thanks for the correction.  I think you overlook that for an FFT you pitch a huge amount of yeast into a small amount of wort.  That pretty much eliminates the differences.  And remember, the purpose of an FFT (at least for me and most) is to test the limit of attenuation, not the performance of the yeast.

I guess where I'm getting hung up here is that if a particular strain of yeast can't break down certain sugars, but another can, then you're not getting an accurate picture of the limit of attenuation for the beer that you're brewing.

Back to my earlier example, 3711 finishes anywhere from 1.002-1.008 for me like clockwork, but I can't imagine a bread yeast getting down that far. And if you have a bread yeast that can ferment maltotriose, then Windsor couldn't get down as far as the bread yeast. The wort composition determines fermentability, but the yeast+wort determines attenuation.

44
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: February 26, 2017, 11:48:03 AM »
Do the types of sugars that the bread yeast will consume roughly line up with what brewers yeast consumes, as in there aren't a bunch more that bread yeast will eat?

Yep.  Remember that originally bakers got their yeast from brewers. Same yeast strain.
Same species, not same strain. I couldn't imagine brewing a batch with 3711, then pitching a packet of Windsor for my FFT. They wouldn't finish anywhere near each other. I would think that the most applicable results would be with the strain you are pitching.

45
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« on: February 26, 2017, 11:28:32 AM »
I almost always drink Ardberg with a little water. Just put a few drops in, smell it, and continue till it kinda opens up some. It's really good stuff.

That's my MO for tasting any scotch. Sipping might be done on ice, but when I really want to dig into the flavor and aroma. it's neat with a splash of water.

I waffle back and forth a bit, but Ardbeg is possibly my favorite Islay distillery. I find Ardbeg to have the most peaty/smoky character out of three south coast Islay distilleries, which are generally the peatiest of all the Islay distilleries.

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