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Messages - erockrph

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31
When I batch-bottled in a bucket (try saying that 5 times fast), I would leave my racking tubing long and curl it around the inner wall of the bottling bucket. This way, when I racked over the beer would be swiring. After I had about an inch of beer in the bottom of the bucket, I drizzled in my hot priming solution. It seemed to mix in pretty well that way.

And +1 to the recommendation to use more water to dissolve your priming sugar. If it is really thick like a syrup it will not mix too easily.

32
Beer Recipes / Re: Belgian Pale Ale yeast
« on: September 19, 2017, 05:11:10 AM »
Good choice IMHO. Bry-97 is the dry equivalent, I think.
Agreed, although it does tend to be a slow starter if fermentation speed is an issue. It does floc better than Chico in my experience, however.

33
Ingredients / Re: Polyclar Brewbrite
« on: September 19, 2017, 05:09:59 AM »
I've been really impressed with diy brewbrite. I've been doing what Hoosierbrew suggested above .5 g per gallon pvpp and 1/2 wf tab for 5.5 gallons. My wort has never been clearer leaving the kettle and my beers have also ended cleared in gereral. Not sure id use on every beer style but I think it gives me positive results for lagers. I've noticed my post boil gravity sample has a smoother flavor, less of a typical pre fermentation harshness. I haven't compared batches with and without but for my lagers I am going to continue using it.

I've noticed similar results myself, although again no side-by-side comparisons on my part either. I'm a stovetop small-batch brewer, and I just pour from my kettle into my fermenter. I've noticed that I have a lot more clear wort on top before I start hitting the fluffy stuff as I pour.

34
Other Fermentables / Re: Salted tart cider
« on: September 18, 2017, 10:07:36 AM »
Malic acid is very tart.  It is naturally present in all apples and is not as pleasant as lactic acid, at least not in elevated concentrations.
It is what they use in things like Warheads candy to make them painfully tart. And fankly, on its own it doesn't have the most pleasant flavor. That said, it is the primary acid in apples, so that is why I recommended it over lactic. I get you're going for a Gose, but at some point I'd think you'd want to emphasize the apple characteristics of the cider.

Personally, I've only used winemakers' acid blend (tartaric, malic and citric acid blend) in my ciders when needed. I bought malic acid to try out last year, but my base juice for the 2016 harvest left plenty of acidity in the finished cider and didn't need any additional acid. I'll see if I need any this year.

35
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« on: September 18, 2017, 03:28:20 AM »
Went camping over the weekend with my wife's family and they are people of simple tastes (Coors Light, Miller Light etc).. so when my brother in law goes in to town for a nip, what does he bring back but a 1/5th of Jack Daniels Black Label. 

It ain't fancy, but man it's good.  I forget how good it is because I think I look down on it as a "bottom shelf" brand, but it's not bad.  Is is single malt scotch? Of course not, but it's not trying to be.  I didn't try it neat, but it mixed really well with Diet Coke.  Strong vanilla flavor from the oak, nice and smooth.  It goes down really well, which can be dangerous.  But, in a situation like camping where I'm not driving anywhere in 3 days, pour me another one! I think I have a bad habit of lumping it in with Evan Williams and Jim Beam, but it's light years better than those two (in my opinion).  Also, at 23$ a 750ml, it's pretty nice on the wallet too.

I like to think of JD and Jim Beam as "middle shelf". They're passable for a shot, and are great mixers. There's a reason it's called "Jack and Coke" and not just "Whiskey and Coke". I always have a bottle of one (or both) on hand.

36
Other Fermentables / Re: Salted tart cider
« on: September 18, 2017, 02:58:14 AM »
I agree with Pete's recommendation to use malic acid (or acid blend) rather than lactic for this.

Taste the salt first. I can't picture enjoying it myself, but it might be OK. I'm thinking something closer to a salted caramel apple rather than a gose might be where you want to set your targets. If that's the case, you could ferment dry and boil down some juice to make an apple caramel for backsweetening.

37
Beer Recipes / Re: Belgian Pale Ale yeast
« on: September 18, 2017, 02:37:23 AM »
Have you considered Chico plus a flocculant English strain? I've use US-05 plus Winsor a few times in combination with good results, and I know that White Labs was marketing a combo of 001+002 (I forget what the number was for the blend).

38
Ingredients / Re: Fishy Hops?
« on: September 18, 2017, 02:04:15 AM »
The only time I've ever picked up a fishy note in a beer was at a small nanobrewery in their saison that was dry-hopped with Sorachi Ace. Their other beers were good, but I have no way to point the finger at any specific part of their process or ingredients to say "that's why it tasted fishy". All I know is that it was a dumper batch that should never have been served to the public.

39
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Off flavors from stressed lager yeast
« on: September 16, 2017, 10:13:32 AM »
Sorry. I was referring to the OP

Edit- looks like my previous post didn't go through. Lemon is not the issue this time. I get that 34/70 sucks but i don't think my problem is related to using this yeast versus a different yeast.

I don't think 34/70 sucks. I think it is a viable alternative to 2124/830. But I have picked up the lemon thing. I think the beer is still good and the ester is faint. It also fades over a few weeks.
Interesting. I've never noticed the lemon thing, but I use Sterling for my lagers and could have easily written it off as hop character.

FWIW, I think 34/70 is the ultimate jack of all trades yeast. It can make a passable version of just about any lager or non-yeast forward ale, and it is very forgiving with fermentation temperatures. That said, it is not my first choice for any style unless I need to ferment a lager near 60F.

S189 is a better choice for a clean, dry lager yeast, but it is way more temperature sensitive. It can throw fusels as low as the mid 50s. And I still prefer liquid yeast when I want that touch of sulfur for a German lager style.

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk


40
Ingredients / Re: Hop Extract & 30 Minute Boils
« on: September 15, 2017, 10:12:02 AM »
CO2 extract (hopshot/resin) is not isomorized.

Is that what he's using?  I didn't see that.  And wouldn't the isomerization happen very quickly?
Most of the extract targeted towards homebrewers is Hop Shot or similar and needs to be boiled to isomerize the same as any hop addition. It doesn't isomerize instantly because it needs more than just heat - it needs to be in solution. And the stuff takes forever to dissolve. Even after a full 60-minute boil and extended hop stand there are still a lot of globules of extract floating around in the wort undissolved.

I did come up with a trick that seems to help the last time I used hop extract. I mixed it in with some DME to make a paste before adding it in. My plan was to increase the surface area of the extract to help it disperse/dissolve more easily. I still have some tweaks to do to improve the process, but I do feel that it made a significant improvement - there were a lot fewer globules left in the wort and the ones that remained were a lot smaller than usual.

I helped beta test Hop Shots years ago, so I'm very familiar with them.  But if homebrewers aren't finding isomerized extract, they aren't looking.  A quick Google produced at least 5 easily available sources, including Morebeer.
The ones I've seen have had a limited shelf life (2-3 months) and cost more for a small bottle than it costs for me to brew a whole batch of beer. If someone had a shelf-stable product at a reasonable price point (like Hop Shot), then I'd certainly try it out. That's probably why MoreBeer has discontinued carrying Isohop extract.

41
Ingredients / Re: Hop Extract & 30 Minute Boils
« on: September 15, 2017, 08:32:45 AM »
I'll need to try your DME trick eric. I normally pull of a couple of quarts and mix before adding, but that's a bit a a time suck.

Last time I didn't use enough DME and the extract started to dissolve it. I think you want to get to a play-doh like consistency, where the extract is just mixed in with the DME as a dispersion.

42
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Off flavors from stressed lager yeast
« on: September 15, 2017, 08:30:50 AM »
Acetaldehyde is also very distinctive in flavor once you know way to look for. Apple esters are different.

And it's not green apple Jolly Rancher like many claim, at least not to me. It's more like that fruity/dirty/solventy aroma of drying paint.

43
Ingredients / Re: Hop Extract & 30 Minute Boils
« on: September 15, 2017, 08:01:30 AM »
CO2 extract (hopshot/resin) is not isomorized.

Is that what he's using?  I didn't see that.  And wouldn't the isomerization happen very quickly?
Most of the extract targeted towards homebrewers is Hop Shot or similar and needs to be boiled to isomerize the same as any hop addition. It doesn't isomerize instantly because it needs more than just heat - it needs to be in solution. And the stuff takes forever to dissolve. Even after a full 60-minute boil and extended hop stand there are still a lot of globules of extract floating around in the wort undissolved.

I did come up with a trick that seems to help the last time I used hop extract. I mixed it in with some DME to make a paste before adding it in. My plan was to increase the surface area of the extract to help it disperse/dissolve more easily. I still have some tweaks to do to improve the process, but I do feel that it made a significant improvement - there were a lot fewer globules left in the wort and the ones that remained were a lot smaller than usual.

44
Ingredients / Re: 2016 hop crop Yakima Valley Hops.
« on: September 15, 2017, 07:31:35 AM »
I'm a big fan of Caliente. It gives a nice stonefruit character (red plum and bing cherry, in particular), with a bit of lemonade and some earthy English hop notes. It goes great in IPA's, and makes for a unique late hop in English styles.

45
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Off flavors from stressed lager yeast
« on: September 15, 2017, 06:58:25 AM »
Acetaldehyde is one of the intermediate steps in the production of ethanol during fermentation. Normally the yeast cleans this up well before the end of fermentation. I think acetaldehyde is usually the byproduct of either a fermentation that is stopped early (cold crash too soon or something of that nature), or a big overpitch that blows through all the sugar really quick and flocs out before it finished cleaning up.

I think that apple off-flavors are probably more likely to be from esters or fusels than acetaldehyde. I realize that's a bit of a semantic argument, since these are all similar off-flavors caused by fermentation issues. But I don't think that acetaldehyde is as big of a boogeyman as it is often made out to be.

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