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Messages - erockrph

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811
Equipment and Software / Re: Walmart Clearance: 2 gal Coleman Stacker
« on: February 15, 2016, 08:19:56 PM »
Thanks for the tip! I have some 1 gallon base malt test batches coming up and a couple of these would make life a heck of a lot easier for me.

812
Yeast and Fermentation / W-34/70 Fermentation Temp exBEERiment
« on: February 15, 2016, 08:17:55 PM »
I noticed that Marshall hasn't been cross-posting new xBmt's here as often, so I went over to Brulosophy to see if anything interesting was posted, when this result really caught my eye:

http://brulosophy.com/2016/02/08/fermentation-temperature-pt-4-lager-yeast-saflager-3470-exbeeriment-results/

Summary - a split batch of Pils was fermented with 34/70 at either 50F or 70F. The results were that A) there weren't enough correct tasters to achieve a significant result (although it was close) and B) of the 12 tasters who did identify the correct sample, 10 of them preferred the one that was brewed at warm temps.

I've been fermenting 34/70 at ambient temps in my basement in the winter, but I might be tempted to push that into the spring and fall now. I also feel validated in recommending 34/70 at warm temps over an ale yeast to all the brewers who keep asking about brewing a "Mocktoberfest" every September. This certainly removes several barriers for new brewers who want to brew lagers - you can use dry yeast, and you can ferment at ale temps. If someone can produce a good ale, there's no reason they can't produce a good lager.

813
Other Fermentables / Re: Dew u think?
« on: February 15, 2016, 07:09:06 PM »

Mt. Dew wine ...Umm this is interesting. I would have thought some preservatives would have been in there but guess not.

Might have to try 1 gallon test batch just to see.

http://www.homebrewsupply.com/learn/brew-the-dew-mountain-dew-wine.html?mc_cid=a2495423ed&mc_eid=b3c9139567
It has sodium benzoate, which will stop yeast growth. If you pitch enough yeast, you can probably get around this, but I'm not 100% convinced.

I have to admit, I tried brewing a batch of "Hard Pepsi" a few years back. The yeast never took off. I chalked it up to preservatives at the time, but it may have also been pH-related, or some combination of the two. I used a dry ale yeast (don't remember which), but they're using wine yeast, which may be a bit more tolerant of that environment.

That was what I thought also. But appears as if they did it- doesn't seem like a spoof. I'm doing it just to see...not that I expect something good.
Keep us posted on how it goes. I was still pretty new at homebrewing, and hadn't even tried brewing a mead yet, when I tried the Pepsi brew. If I were trying it again, I'd definitely do a few things differently - overpitch, oxygenate well, and possibly raise the pH a bit with bicarb.

If you pull it off, I'd possibly consider giving it another try myself.

814
Other Fermentables / Re: Dew u think?
« on: February 15, 2016, 05:55:54 PM »
And a Northeast Ohio thing in the late 80s Ken
New England in the mid-90's, too :)

815
Other Fermentables / Re: Dew u think?
« on: February 15, 2016, 05:50:53 PM »
Mt. Dew wine ...Umm this is interesting. I would have thought some preservatives would have been in there but guess not.

Might have to try 1 gallon test batch just to see.

http://www.homebrewsupply.com/learn/brew-the-dew-mountain-dew-wine.html?mc_cid=a2495423ed&mc_eid=b3c9139567
It has sodium benzoate, which will stop yeast growth. If you pitch enough yeast, you can probably get around this, but I'm not 100% convinced.

I have to admit, I tried brewing a batch of "Hard Pepsi" a few years back. The yeast never took off. I chalked it up to preservatives at the time, but it may have also been pH-related, or some combination of the two. I used a dry ale yeast (don't remember which), but they're using wine yeast, which may be a bit more tolerant of that environment.

816
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Caribou Slobber with Windsor Ale yeast
« on: February 15, 2016, 05:08:32 PM »
Windsor has low attenuation because there is a certain starch (I cannot recall the name of the starch) it cannot consume. However, that same starch is apparently not tastable and therefore the higher attenuation does not make the beer taste sweet.

It is maltotriose that Winsor can't metabolize. Maltotriose kind of falls in the no-man's land between sugars and dextrins. It does have some sweetness, but it's a lot lower than most disaccharides. That's why the higher FG's from Winsor don't necessarily lead to a significantly sweeter beer.

817
All Grain Brewing / Re: Max # of malts in commercial beer recipe
« on: February 15, 2016, 04:41:27 PM »
I wonder how many malts in this beer:


818
All Grain Brewing / Re: ESB water profile
« on: February 15, 2016, 04:36:18 PM »
I think that looks good for an ESB with lower minerality. You may want to consider bumping the Cl a bit to boost the malt a little, but that's your call. My ESB water profile looks pretty similar to yours, but with 100ppm Cl and 150ppm Sulphate (spelled with a "ph" since it's an English ale :) )

819
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2016 Spring Swap
« on: February 15, 2016, 04:15:47 PM »
Just a quick follow up on the challenge beer. DME only, or can it supplement LME? I have an extract batch on the schedule for training a newbie that is mainly LME but I was going to add DME to bump it up anyways. Does that fall into the fair game plan?
The original challenge was going to be a more restrictive, but the rules were loosened up and the way I read it is that it must contain DME, but doesn't specify how much or what other sources you may use for your fermentables. I think your planned beer should be fine. Mine contains both DME and LME, and I stuck pretty close to the original guidelines.

820
The Pub / Re: in trouble again :(
« on: February 14, 2016, 07:23:19 PM »
As far as rousing goes, it will help ensure that flocculent yeast stay in suspension longer to ensure it finishes up fully. I don't know how that would factor into a speed fermentation, but it certainly helps with diacetyl producing yeast like 1968.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


821
The Pub / Re: in trouble again :(
« on: February 14, 2016, 07:19:23 PM »
You actually warm it to like 120F for 10-15 minutes while covered. What happens is any diacetyl precursors still left in the beer are converted to diacetyl, and you will be able to smell it in the heated sample. If its clean, then you know that the yeast won't be creating more diacetyl over time.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


822
All Grain Brewing / Re: water to grain ratio
« on: February 14, 2016, 07:01:17 PM »
You guys just rocked my world.  For 17 years I have been using 1.25 ratio and have been getting a mash efficiency between 94-98%. Then 5.5 gl of sparge water for a 5 gallon batch.  Ferment in a 6 gallon carboy.  Perhaps I'll bump up the mash water and lose some of the sparge water.
FWIW, I use anywhere from 3-3.5 qt/gallon in my beers (BIAB/no-sparge) with no issues to speak of.
Those are small gallons!  8)
Lol qt/lb obviously :)

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


823
All Grain Brewing / Re: water to grain ratio
« on: February 14, 2016, 12:58:31 PM »
You guys just rocked my world.  For 17 years I have been using 1.25 ratio and have been getting a mash efficiency between 94-98%. Then 5.5 gl of sparge water for a 5 gallon batch.  Ferment in a 6 gallon carboy.  Perhaps I'll bump up the mash water and lose some of the sparge water.
FWIW, I use anywhere from 3-3.5 qt/gallon in my beers (BIAB/no-sparge) with no issues to speak of.

824
Beer Recipes / Re: american wheat
« on: February 14, 2016, 12:56:14 PM »
What does torrified wheat bring to the party?
I use it in many English-style ales. It has a bit of a nuttiness, and like any unmalted wheat product, it boosts the head formation quite a bit. Since traditional English ales contain a significant amount of simple sugar, that is certainly helpful.

825
The Pub / Re: in trouble again :(
« on: February 14, 2016, 11:39:33 AM »
I would look at yeast strain and fermentation temp scheme to address  your diacetyl.
I agree with this. Pick a low D producer that flocs quickly and rouse often as you bump the temps. You should probably incorporate a forced diacetyl test before you cold crash as well to ensure that you won't run into issues down the line.

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