Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - erockrph

Pages: 1 ... 56 57 [58] 59 60 ... 161
856
Going to finish bottling the last 2 batches of my single-hopped beers tonight. Racking my strawberry mead off the second dose of strawberries into a tertiary to start clarifying this weekend. Then on Tuesday brewing a batch that will be split into a saison and a lambic.

857
All Things Food / Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
« on: July 31, 2013, 05:19:16 AM »
gmac, thanks for the reminder to look for tomato worms. They are really amazing wicked looking aren't they? 
Who knows what they turn into?

Hawkmoth - equally wicked looking, but pretty badass at the same time:


858

After 3 days i will rack 2 gallons into a separate fermenter and add 1 gallon of unhopped wort to bring the 3 gallons up to 1.048 (and thus dilute the IBU's from 12 to 8]. By my calculation this is equal to about 1.5 lbs of light DME. At this point I pitch my bugs and strap on my Brew Belt to kick the lacto into gear. This way I also get some flavor and mouthfeel contributions from the 3711, but add some food back for the lacto.
...
So, does this sound reasonable? Am I missing anything obvious?

I don't think your plan for souring will work.  Not sure what specific lacto strain you'll be using, but I doubt you'll get much sourness from the lacto as the yeast will eat up the fermentables in your unhopped wort.   Also heating up already fermented wort sounds like a bad idea.  It would make more sense to sour the unhopped wort and then add it to the 2 gallons of fermented wort.

The sour beer is a lambic, not a Berliner Weisse, so eventually pedio will take over the rest of the souring. I'm pitching a mixed culture I've built up from some lambic and Flanders dregs, so I'm not really counting on the lacto for all the sourness. And I'm not talking about heating the fermented wort super hot. With my Brew Belt I doubt I can get much higher than 80F, which is where I'd normally be ramping 3711 to anyways. I just want to make sure the lacto gets as much food as it can before the 3711 finishes up.

859
Due to a serious lack of time I want to combine two similar brews into one brewday, then split them off partway into primary. I thought I'd bounce my basic plan off of the forum in case I'm overlooking something or if someone has a better idea.

I want to end up with 3 gallons of 1.040/28 IBU saison and 3 gallons of 1.048/8 IBU lambic. I can produce 4 gallons of wort max in a batch. So here's what I was thinking:

Main batch - 4 gallons of 1.040/12 IBU wort. Pitch 3711 and ferment in the mid 60's for 3 days.

After 3 days i will rack 2 gallons into a separate fermenter and add 1 gallon of unhopped wort to bring the 3 gallons up to 1.048 (and thus dilute the IBU's from 12 to 8]. By my calculation this is equal to about 1.5 lbs of light DME. At this point I pitch my bugs and strap on my Brew Belt to kick the lacto into gear. This way I also get some flavor and mouthfeel contributions from the 3711, but add some food back for the lacto.

The remaining 2 gallons get a gallon of 1.040 wort with enough IBU's to bring the 3 gallons up to 28 IBU's (60 IBU's by my calculation), plus my flameout hops. Once it's finished I will process as usual (one gallon will be going on some red and pink currants, and some on hibiscus as well).

So, does this sound reasonable? Am I missing anything obvious?

860
All Things Food / Re: Tip
« on: July 30, 2013, 04:00:21 PM »
Actually a tortilla is worse for you than a good bun. But I don't care. There has to be some fiber in that sausage somewhere.

Corn tortilla fixes the "worse for you than a bun" issue and helps on the fiber front, too.

861
Ingredients / Re: The "Truth" About Commercial Beer.
« on: July 30, 2013, 03:57:49 PM »
I also have no desire to seek out pay for Kopi Luwak coffee, though if someone brewed a cup I might could be tempted...

edited to reflect my thoughts on said topic

862
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Exploding bottles, what the heck?
« on: July 30, 2013, 03:52:48 PM »
This may sound crazy, but I wonder sometimes if US-05 doesn't have some latent fermentation activity. Seems like beers made with that strain always seemed to have continued activity if not kept cold in bottles or kegs.

That's strange. I use US-05 for at least half my beers and I've never noticed an increase in carbonation over time. I don't filter (or even cold crash) before bottling, and I've had brews sitting in the cellar in the mid 60's for well over a year with no problems. Maybe you got a bad batch?

863
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hop varieties for a warmer world
« on: July 30, 2013, 03:04:25 PM »
Without getting political I wonder if hop cultivators are developing any hop varieties that will still produce  tasty cones as the world warms up a few degrees.  It seems that most hops are best suited in very moist areas with moderate temps, but I wonder how well these plants will do if the climate gets a little drier and warmer.

Actually, most hop varieties are best suited to a wet winter followed by a dry, warm summer. That's why Yakima and Willamette are so well-suited for growing hops. As the weather warms up the winters are tending to get even wetter. Who knows, maybe global warming will actually be a boon to hop production.

864
Ingredients / Re: The "Truth" About Commercial Beer.
« on: July 28, 2013, 08:07:25 PM »
I dunno, if I search for "beaver anus" I don't find anything about raspberries...

865
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Is a blowoff tube worth the loss?
« on: July 28, 2013, 10:51:13 AM »
Fermcap-S also helps control blowoff. It is primarily used to control foam in the boil but effect transfers to lower krausen in the fermenter.

There has been discussion here in the past about fermcap being a health risk.

Most of those discussions include a health professional (such as myself) trying to reassure everyone that the supposed health risks are not based on any valid scientific data. It's basically the same thing as Gas-X, which is safe to give to a newborn. But you are free to choose what you want in your beer, that's what makes this hobby so great.

866
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Is a blowoff tube worth the loss?
« on: July 28, 2013, 05:22:22 AM »
You're losing beer because you're using a 5-gallon carboy. Even if you don't use a blowoff tube the beer will still blow off - perhaps explosively. If you use a 6.5 gallon bucket you should be fine except for maybe certain hefe strains that need a crapload of headspace.

But still, I wouldn't sweat losing a few beers in the long run.

867
All Things Food / Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
« on: July 26, 2013, 09:10:03 PM »
It's been a strange season for the garden for me. First we got a late frost that wiped out my first tomato and pepper plants. Then we had a really wet spring for a while that led to a slow start for some veggies and a fast start for others, followed by a dry snap in June.

Peas were slow to start (I actually picked my first Jalapeno before I picked my first pea), then they gave up the ghost about a week after I picked the first pod. I tried a low variety that doesn't need a trellis, but it's a pain compared to a normal trellised variety.

Everything that actually took hold and didn't get overrun by weeds is doing fantastic right now. Our heat wave the last 2 weeks really kicked everything into high gear up here. The "beer crisper" drawer in my fridge is full of zucchini, and that's just my first plant - the second one I started from seed is just getting ready to set fruit. I've gotten a few eggplant already and have about 7 or 8 to pick over the next 3 or 4 days. Chili peppers are starting to kick into gear, and I just got my first 4 ripe cherry tomatoes this week. The Romas are starting to ripen and the beefsteaks are getting fat.

I'm barely able to keep up with the cukes, but I'm about to be overrun. I had every intention of running them up tomato cages this year, but I had a few days where I couldn't get out in the garden and now they have carpeted that whole section of the garden. The good thing is that the bunnies won't go past the cukes to the other side of the garden.

My biggest surprise is that it looks like I'm going to actually get some ripe watermelons this year. In years past even the icebox varieties haven't started setting fruit until August and never ripened in time before fall hit. Right now I already have a few that are getting close thanks to the heatwave.

This is also my first season where I got a harvest from my currants and gooseberries. I have enough red and pink currants in the freezer to add to a couple of gallons of saison. Some of the black currants found their way into a strawberry melomel, and the rest will probably hang out in the freezer until next year when my sours start to come online.

Next up is trying to get some kale, carrots and beets going for the fall garden. My root veggie patch got overrun by weeds this spring, so I'm hoping I can keep it under control until the crops start going strong.

868
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 1st all Brett beer
« on: July 26, 2013, 11:18:27 AM »
Do you have a recommendation for a priming calculator capable of factoring in the gravity?

A good rule of thumb is that each gravity point will net you 0.5 volumes of CO2.

869
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: advice on dry hopping
« on: July 26, 2013, 11:12:37 AM »

Using a screen on the end of your dip tube should have prevented clogging.
+1
This should work, I use a hop bag over the cane when I siphon but I also primary in buckets and just toss the hops in to swim, whole or pellets

+2

I use a paint strainer bag, but same idea. That might be tougher to pull off in a carboy, but you could use a nylon stocking instead of a bag. Either make sure it's long enough so you grab it in your hand to keep it from slipping off, or use a couple of zip ties to clamp it to your siphon. If the siphon starts running slow start moving it in slow circles to help keep it from getting clogged.

It's interesting that you are having this problem with whole hops. For me I usually run into it more with pellets since they form a thicker sludge. Neither compares with fruit however. It must have taken almost 20 minutes for me to rack 2 gallons of mead off some strawberries this weekend.

870
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Clean your bottles !
« on: July 26, 2013, 08:56:30 AM »
Triple rinse after pouring is my method. Fill it about a quarter of the way, shake, empty, repeat 2 more times. Seems to work well.

I do this. I basically rinse/shake/empty/repeat until the rinse water runs clear, then rinse one more time. Still, the OP's finding makes me want to do a QC check on a dozen bottles or so to ensure that I'm not missing anything.

Pages: 1 ... 56 57 [58] 59 60 ... 161