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Messages - erockrph

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871
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swap-toberfest '15
« on: December 11, 2015, 04:31:47 PM »
This has been fun to follow. I might try to participate in this at some point. I don't think my beers are up to par with the rest of ya but maybe one day...
I'm glad I joined in this time around. I don't have a local club, so this forum is what I think of as my homebrew club. It's nice to share some brews with someone other than my buddies who think that everything I make is good enough to go pro with.

Most of my beers are one-offs or experimental, and would be several iterations away from being NHC caliber if I decided to hone them in. I still felt comfortable with this crowd in sharing. I expected friendly feedback, and that's what I got. I also got a great suggestion from Jim to oak my Gewurztraminer Saison, which I will be trying very soon. Basically, it's exactly what I'd expect from a friendly local club.

872
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Episode 3 - Experimental Brewing
« on: December 11, 2015, 11:03:42 AM »

All-grain brewing is so time-consuming I think it will always be a niche hobby and could also fall out of favour a bit. Also no real financial saving if you start spending lots of money on shiny equipment.

So, apparently, you don't play golf?  ;)

Seriously, though, I don't brew to save money on craft beer. I do it purely for the enjoyment. And the beer.

Indeed.  You could say the same thing about gardening, and it's on the rise.  I think the whole "maker culture" thing will make sure that a decline is no more than a cycle.
I agree with the "maker culture" aspect. I don't even consider home brewing a distinct hobby for me. Its part of my lifestyle of making my own food and doing as much as possible with my own hands and mind. I garden, cook from scratch, keep bees, keep chickens, have a little orchard, forage for mushrooms, and brew my own beer, mead, cider etc. just because I find it all fascinating and rewarding. I bet I save zero money on any of these, although if I had to I could.
I agree as well. Yesterday I made some cheese just because I had a day to myself, but not enough time to brew. Now I have over 2 pounds of mascarpone "just because" and no clue how I'm going to use all of it while it's still fresh. Regardless, I made it from fresh, local milk with my own hands and I enjoyed every minute. Actually getting to eat it is just gravy at that point.

873
Ingredients / Re: Northern Brewer for porter
« on: December 10, 2015, 06:17:56 PM »
I am from the USA. I like mint. I like chocolate. But mint chocolate is nasty crap lol. I actually just saw a ThirstyDog beer tonight that was a mint chocolate milk stout. My lip quivers at the thought.
I can't see myself enjoying it in a beer, but the combo in general is just fine in my books. I've been growing a mint cultivar called "Chocolate mint" the past few years, and there's just a subtle cocoa note to it that I really enjoy.

874
Ingredients / Re: Northern Brewer for porter
« on: December 10, 2015, 11:17:57 AM »
Well, sorry, I'm Belgian, and in Belgian mint and chocolate do not go well.

What is wrong with you.  ???

I'm just a twerp who thinks that bad mint and bad chocolate are a match made in hell.
Well, when your country is famous for crap like Godiva and Guy Lian, it's not a surprise that you have no taste for chocolate  :P

Northern Brewer does not taste like mint. It has an herbaceous quality that some may describe as minty for lack of a better term, but it's not like spearmint or peppermint. It's closer to horehound candy or a Ricola lozenge in my opinion. It should be just fine in a porter. Personally, I'd bitter with the NB and move the Fuggles to your late addition. The Fuggles have more of an "English" late hop character.

875
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Episode 3 - Experimental Brewing
« on: December 10, 2015, 10:59:26 AM »
Regarding the 1-gallon kits, if LHBS's are really losing money because consumers who just want to try out the hobby and may not stay with it can do it more inexpensively, then they are being very short-sighted. In the long run, by lowering the barrier of entry into the hobby you will eventually start to entice and retain more brewers. The typical middle class family doesn't often have the kind of free time that a serious investment into all-grain brewing requires. Or at the very least, it's hard to justify that kind of time investment initially.

One gallon kits and Picobrew systems are what will keep this hobby growing in the future and keep it from becoming stagnant.

On another note, I really like the show format. The segment format seems to be working well, and you guys have already ironed out most of the rough edges just 3 episodes in. Keep them coming!

876
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: bicarbonates in water
« on: December 10, 2015, 08:41:40 AM »
My question was more of a theoretical nature. I myself use demi-water for pale beers and dilute my 180 ppm bicarbonate tap water for dark beers, thanks to what I have learned on this forum and by using Bru'nwater. But what I see homebrewers do in Belgium and the Netherlands is simply add lactic acid to their tap water (which typically has 150-250 ppm bicarbonate), and quite high amounts at that. For example, in one APA recipe that won a first price I noticed the addition of 8,50 ml lactic acid in a 14 liter batch. This should be have a negative impact on the beer, right? I was then wondering what exactly causes the off-flavor, and if I understand this thread correctly the flavor "provider" is lactate, which has a flavor threshold of around 400 ppm.
The fault in this logic is that you are considering lactate as an "off" flavor. Lactate provides flavor above a certain threshold, and at too high a level it may be out of style for a particular beer, but I don't consider it an off flavor the way I would something like chlorophenols, for example.

Lactate does not create a negative impact on a beer simply by default, although in most styles the allowable amount would likely be very low.

And which not necessarily negative flavor I prithee. Yoghurt-like?
It's hard to quantify as much at a lower level, but a clean Berliner Weisse is probably the closest comparison. If you can clearly pick it out as lactic tasting, then you're over the threshold for most non-sour beers.

Spike a beer with increasing amounts until you taste something, that's probably the best way to teach your palate.

877
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: bicarbonates in water
« on: December 10, 2015, 08:24:07 AM »
My question was more of a theoretical nature. I myself use demi-water for pale beers and dilute my 180 ppm bicarbonate tap water for dark beers, thanks to what I have learned on this forum and by using Bru'nwater. But what I see homebrewers do in Belgium and the Netherlands is simply add lactic acid to their tap water (which typically has 150-250 ppm bicarbonate), and quite high amounts at that. For example, in one APA recipe that won a first price I noticed the addition of 8,50 ml lactic acid in a 14 liter batch. This should be have a negative impact on the beer, right? I was then wondering what exactly causes the off-flavor, and if I understand this thread correctly the flavor "provider" is lactate, which has a flavor threshold of around 400 ppm.
The fault in this logic is that you are considering lactate as an "off" flavor. Lactate provides flavor above a certain threshold, and at too high a level it may be out of style for a particular beer, but I don't consider it an off flavor the way I would something like chlorophenols, for example.

Lactate does not create a negative impact on a beer simply by default, although in most styles the allowable amount would likely be very low.

878
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: bicarbonates in water
« on: December 10, 2015, 05:51:42 AM »
I'd try Citric Acid, personally.  If I remember correctly, Calcium Citrate is insoluble, and will precipitate out of solution.  Plus it's available at the LHBS in the wine-making section.

That said it might be better for adjusting strike water then the actual mash where you have any number more compounds floating around.
Calcium citrate is plenty soluble in water at the temperatures and concentrations we're talking about (0.85g/L at room temp). It's superior solubility is the main reason why it is preferred over calcium carbonate for calcium supplementation.

Citrate has an even sharper flavor than lactate in my opinion. I don't feel that it has a place in beer, except possibly in a fruit beer that falls a bit flat in flavor (and even then, I'm not so sure),

879
Ingredients / Re: Riwaka???
« on: December 08, 2015, 09:25:04 PM »
To me, it was primarily Cascade-esque white grapefruit. I got a faint, weird savory note from it as well - not quite garlic/onion, but maybe approaching it just a tad. Honestly, I wasn't that impressed when I tried it. It wasn't bad, but there was nothing that stood out as all that interesting, either. But weather/growing/harvest conditions all make a difference in hop character, so hopefully your Riwaka is better than the ones I had.

All that said, Riwaka + Galaxy definitely has potential for the citrus/passionfruit bomb you're shooting for.

880
The Pub / Re: Just to preserve some perspective...
« on: December 08, 2015, 06:44:50 PM »
Could be worse, I've had Harpoon UFO served off their IPA tap at a local chain restaurant.

881
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« on: December 08, 2015, 06:34:25 PM »
I typically try mine room temp and then with a very large ice cube. Room temp this time of year is 68. In the summer more like 74. I generally find I like most of them with the cube because the flavor changes as the cube melts.
Same here, I try it first and generally prefer one cube.
For a slow sipper, I'm the same way. But for a serious "getting to know you" tasting, I will drop about half a straw's worth of RO/filtered water just to open it up a bit and take it from there.

If it's a social night and I'm just having whiskey for drinks, more rocks is just fine too. But in those cases I'm typically sticking with something familiar like Knob Creek (or Johnny Black if it's a scotch night).

882
Beer Recipes / Re: Quadruple & the BJCP Guidelines
« on: December 07, 2015, 11:55:58 AM »
My understanding that breweries in Belgium don't use "style guidelines" ;)

Brew it the way you want it; submit it; take a point hit for the color.

Edit: Also, all BDSA are Quads but not all Quads are BDSA (think I got that right, or it's vice-versa :D)
I thought it was the other way around - Quad is one type of BDSA, but not every BDSA is a Quad.

883
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Lager
« on: December 07, 2015, 09:04:41 AM »
I've done something very similar recently. You might want to bump your late hops a bit if you want some hop flavor and aroma. Between the maltiness of the Red X and the time spent lagering, you're going to find less late hop character in the finished beer. Or at least that was my experience.

884
Other Fermentables / Re: Injera
« on: December 06, 2015, 09:37:05 PM »
So that's how they do it! There is a fantastic Ethiopian/Eritrean restaurant in Providence, and I always heard it described as a sourdough pancake, but I always knew that it was more complicated than that. Thanks for sharing. Looks great.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

885
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: White Labs Yeast Vault
« on: December 06, 2015, 07:58:46 PM »
I also put in for the Klassic Ale.

I was the first person to place an order WLP033.   I appears that someone other than you and I placed an order for WLP033.
Actually, I ordered 2 packs. I figured since this might be a one time thing I'd get a spare just in case.

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