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Messages - erockrph

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916
The Pub / Re: Boring 92 beer selection
« on: March 01, 2016, 12:08:17 PM »
I mean, seriously, how much IPA can one take? There's more to beer than hops.

My bride and I went to dinner last night to a local restaurant/bar that boasts 18 taps.  There was one Pilsner, two winter warmers, three pale ales... and all the rest were IPAs.

I love IPAs - I drink more IPAs than anything else, but wow.
I can relate to that. I'm a huge hophead myself. Back in the day, whenever I discovered a new brewery the first thing I wanted to try was their IPA. Now I rarely try a new commercial IPA, and when I check out a new brewery I'm drawn to anything that's not an IPA.

917
Beer Recipes / Re: asian inpsired rice lager
« on: March 01, 2016, 11:02:35 AM »
I think it's an interesting idea although I would consider buying some of the interesting sake rice varieties rather than using regular flaked rice or dosing sake on the backend.
Alas, Japanese sake makers are more protective of their rice than German brewers are with their brewing secrets. I'm pretty sure that unless you're actually making sake commercially in Japan, that you're going to have a hard time getting your hands on their rice. Plus, the polishing process that is used to mill down the rice grains is not something that we have access to.

All that said, sushi rice will probably get you the closest.

918
The end of fermentation addition enhances linalool, geraniol, and citronellol. Recently I read that those are some of the most volitile aroma compounds in beer. That agrees with your observation.
Out of curiosity, where did you get that information from? I'm of the opinion that the main benefit of dry-hopping at the end of fermentation is that less oils are pulled out of solution by adsorption to falling trub. The boiling points of the major sesquiterpine aroma compounds that we attribute to hop aroma (including the ones you mention above) are all above the boiling point of water. I question the old brewing adages regarding the volatility of these compounds.

Stan Hieronymus has referenced it in a Zymurgy article, among other places.  I experienced the increased geraniol, which is why I now rack to secondary before dry hopping.
I've read and listened to many of Stan's articles and presentations on the topic, as well as many of his source materials and published studies. What Stan was referring to was the biotransformation that happens by the yeast, which can indeed convert linalool to geraniol. What is interesting is that there are other studies which show that yeast also convert geraniol to linalool as well. The end result of biotransformation is probably going to look different based on yeast strain, starting oil content of your hops, etc. And by getting most of your yeast out of suspension before starting your dry hops, you take biotransformation out of the equation and probably increase your repeatability and predictability in your dry hopping.

What I'm calling into question is specifically the idea that hop oils themselves are somehow fleeting and highly volatile. It just doesn't add up for me.

919
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: March 01, 2016, 08:59:26 AM »
Thanks for the info on brewer's caramel.
Here's my post from my taste and color testing when I got this in:

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=24192.msg308521

920
The end of fermentation addition enhances linalool, geraniol, and citronellol. Recently I read that those are some of the most volitile aroma compounds in beer. That agrees with your observation.
Out of curiosity, where did you get that information from? I'm of the opinion that the main benefit of dry-hopping at the end of fermentation is that less oils are pulled out of solution by adsorption to falling trub. The boiling points of the major sesquiterpine aroma compounds that we attribute to hop aroma (including the ones you mention above) are all above the boiling point of water. I question the old brewing adages regarding the volatility of these compounds.

921
All Grain Brewing / Re: Port - beer hybrid
« on: March 01, 2016, 08:22:32 AM »
Thanks y'all!

So, an English barley wine then. I've been meaning to brew one anyways.

Anyone have a link to a recipe for a particularly relevant one?

Now to find someone who knows his/her ports....my friend likes port but I'm pretty sure he doesn't know about good port yet.

For an English Barleywine of this style the recipe is really simple. 100% Maris Otter or other UK Pale Ale malt to an OG in the ballpark of 1.120. You want between 50 and 60 IBU's from something like EKG at 60 minutes, and about 0.25-0.5 oz of EKG per gallon at the end of the boil.

Pitch a big, healthy pitch of a relatively attenuative English yeast. Like lager-sized pitch or bigger. You might want to step it up more than once and increase the gravity with each step. I usually just brew a few beers of increasing gravity, and pitch the entire cake from a 1.060ish beer. Oxygenate well, then repeat in 12-18 hours. An FG around 1.030 will lend you in the realm of a port or sherry after some time to age.

922
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: All Sour Brewing
« on: March 01, 2016, 05:37:04 AM »
To me, sours are like barley wines. They are a treat that I enjoy once or twice a month. I brew a couple of batches if each a year and that is already more than I would consume even if I didn't try any commercial examples. Thankfully both are typically suitable for cellaring.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


923
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: February 29, 2016, 07:47:02 PM »
I ordered mine from the UK, and paid through the nose for shipping. It was a total impulse buy at the time. My impression is that it is essentially the same idea as Sinamar, but with even less flavor impact.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


924
The Pub / Re: Coors being sued for not brewing all beer in CO
« on: February 29, 2016, 12:21:26 PM »
I really enjoyed touring the Coors brewery - bought some sweet Coors Light sweatbands.
Even though I'm not a fan of mass-market lagers, I would certainly enjoy going through a brewery tour at any of them. It's cool to see what makes the big boys tick, even if the scale and end product aren't your cup of tea.

925
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: February 29, 2016, 12:15:39 PM »
If I could find brewer's caramel for a reasonable price, I'd use it too, but since the jury is still out on it adding any flavor I'll just let this be a pale mild.
I used enough brewer's caramel to turn Pivo Pils into a dark schwarzbier, and didn't pick up a lick of flavor. I'd consider it a colorant only.

As far as the flavor of your beer goes, I'd look for American Pale Ale malt for your base if that's an option at this point. That should at least be a bit more flavorful than regular 2-row pale malt.

For 1968, I like 68F for fermentation. For a small beer like this I could be done in a matter of days, so I'd start rousing and bumping the temperature 3 or 4 days in.

What I think really lets English beers to get away with sugar in small beers is the low carbonation level. If you plan on carbonating this like an American ale (in the 2.5 volume range) and serve it ice cold, then it will certainly seem watery. If you serve it like an English/cask ale - a bit warmer and in the 1.8-2 volume range, then you can probably get away with it.

926
I get why people arrive at the 170* hop stand temperature.  I recently tried it at 140* specifically because Myrcene boils at 145*.  So instead of choosing the temperature based on SMM/DMS conversion and maintaining enough heat to kill stuff floating on dust, I chose the temperature based on flavor considerations. 

I have not done a side by side comparison.  That would be interesting.
Where are you getting the 145F reference for Myrcene's boiling point? I'm seeing 331F-334F:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrcene

927
Ingredients / Re: Weyermann Barke malts
« on: February 29, 2016, 08:18:15 AM »
I bought all three Barke malts (Pils, Vienna and Munich) and plan on brewing with all three next week.

What is the Lovibond on the Munich? Do they have Light and Dark Munich varieties, or just a light one?

928
I'm wondering if frequent stirring would close the delta a bit between the two methods. Maybe a hop stand vs. whirlpool xBmt in the future?

Also, I noticed that it was only a 20 minute hop stand. Again, I wonder if lengthening that would close the gap as well.

929
The Pub / Re: Cigars
« on: February 29, 2016, 03:56:19 AM »
Alas, I haven't had a cigar in years. I just don't have the kind of free time to enjoy a good smoke since parenthood started. I've also come to the conclusion that smoking one blows out my palate for a day or two. So as much as I enjoy the combo of stogies and scotch, I've been making do with scotch on its own in recent years.

I have been tempted recently because I see that my favorite cigar from way back in the mid-90's cigar boom is back on the market - Flor de Florez. Their Miami Blend was the best cigar I ever smoked. They vanished in the late 90's/early 00's, but it looks like they're back now. I think I still have an unopened box of their old Cabinet Selection, but I doubt they're in decent shape at this point, since they haven't been stored in the best of conditions.

930
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: February 29, 2016, 03:19:28 AM »
I'm hoping to squeeze in a double brewday tomorrow, but I'm working a 3-3 shift today so we'll see how productive I'm actually able to be.

Brew #1 - 1957 Whitbread IPA using WLP002. This is based on a recipe and recent series of posts of Ron Pattinson's blog. Apparently session-strength IPA is nothing new; they've had IPAs of various strengths in England going way back. It will be interesting to see how this compares to our modern American "Session IPA" - I expect it to taste nothing like them. Shooting for a very poundable 1.037 OG and low-to-mid 3's ABV.

Brew #2 - Planning to break in my new 2 gallon coolers with a 2-gallon batch of a Belgian-ish IPA/Pale Ale kinda thing. Grist is Belgian Pils with about 10% D-45 candi syrup. Hops are Styrian Goldings and X-17. Yeast is WLP570. Targeting low 1.050's/40 IBU, so closer to a "Belgian APA" rather than a "Belgian IPA", but I think there is too much of a clash at higher IBU levels with spicy Belgian yeast.

Brew #2 is essentially a big starter for an upcoming Duvel clone, so I'm using it to test out a few ideas I've been kicking around:

- X-17 for Belgian ales - my single-hop trial batch had me thinking that this would be a great hop for a witbier and/or Belgian IPA. I picked Styrian Goldings to go along with it because I loved the early Duvel Tripel Hops, and the marmalade and spice character should go well with the citrus from X-17. I'm hoping that this will be a solid combo.
- 120F Whirlpool - I'm only doing one late addition on this one, a 1 hour whirlpool at 120F. I've started playing with this technique, but I haven't tried it as the sole flavor/aroma addition. Going with 2 oz/gallon - a hefty addition, but far less than my usual IPA insanity.
- D-45 in place of Crystal malt - I've used D-45 in more traditional BPA's before and liked the results, but I've never really used it without any other specialty malts. I've been kicking around the idea that it may bring some caramel character similar to a medium crystal malt, but help dry the beer out at the same time, rather than boost the body. It will also be interesting to see what it does to the color on its own. Using 5 oz in a 2 gallon batch.

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