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Messages - erockrph

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991
Excuse me sir, but you took those points out of a post and turned them into questions, taking each out of the context of the original post, which is simply a list of things that could be omitted or simplified during brewing (in contrast to not omitting the step or the more complex solution).  You then posited your knowledge in an attempt to make yourself look knowledgeable about the end result and get an 'atta boy out of it.

The empirical knowledge you posted is nothing new.

Adding to, modifying or clarifying the list would be contributing to the thread.  Constant counter pointing with opinion, "you" oriented posts and "this^^^" type posts doesn't contribute anything.
Actually, your original post specifically asks what differences one would expect in the final product, to which you received many thoughtful responses. Keep track of your trolling, buddy:

Given a beer brewed by an experienced brewer that meticulously measures, weighs and calculates every detail (a perfect process, hitting all numbers) and a beer brewed by an experienced brewer that is "casual" in measuring, weighing and calculating, perhaps skips things they deem unnecessary - what differences would be experienced in tasting the final product?

I think from this point on, I for one will choose TL;DR your posts. Good day, sir.

992
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Secondary Fermenter Headspace
« on: March 01, 2016, 12:22:20 PM »
You could purge with CO2 if you have access to that. If not, you could add a small dose of sugar or DME to kick off some active fermentation in the beginning. That would help use up and blow off oxygen from the headspace.

993
The Pub / Re: How Many States Have You Been To? A Bucket List Thing.
« on: March 01, 2016, 12:17:25 PM »
22 here. I'm not counting Washington yet. Even though I technically left the airport, it was just to transport to the cruise ship.

At some point when my son is older (like high school age), I want to take a leave from work one summer and drive through all 48 of the lower states. That's been a bucket list of mine. If I can't get more than a few weeks, then the next best would be to drive all of Route 1 from Maine down to Key West, stopping in each state for at least one night.

994
The Pub / Re: Boring 92 beer selection
« on: March 01, 2016, 12:08:17 PM »
I mean, seriously, how much IPA can one take? There's more to beer than hops.

My bride and I went to dinner last night to a local restaurant/bar that boasts 18 taps.  There was one Pilsner, two winter warmers, three pale ales... and all the rest were IPAs.

I love IPAs - I drink more IPAs than anything else, but wow.
I can relate to that. I'm a huge hophead myself. Back in the day, whenever I discovered a new brewery the first thing I wanted to try was their IPA. Now I rarely try a new commercial IPA, and when I check out a new brewery I'm drawn to anything that's not an IPA.

995
Beer Recipes / Re: asian inpsired rice lager
« on: March 01, 2016, 11:02:35 AM »
I think it's an interesting idea although I would consider buying some of the interesting sake rice varieties rather than using regular flaked rice or dosing sake on the backend.
Alas, Japanese sake makers are more protective of their rice than German brewers are with their brewing secrets. I'm pretty sure that unless you're actually making sake commercially in Japan, that you're going to have a hard time getting your hands on their rice. Plus, the polishing process that is used to mill down the rice grains is not something that we have access to.

All that said, sushi rice will probably get you the closest.

996
The end of fermentation addition enhances linalool, geraniol, and citronellol. Recently I read that those are some of the most volitile aroma compounds in beer. That agrees with your observation.
Out of curiosity, where did you get that information from? I'm of the opinion that the main benefit of dry-hopping at the end of fermentation is that less oils are pulled out of solution by adsorption to falling trub. The boiling points of the major sesquiterpine aroma compounds that we attribute to hop aroma (including the ones you mention above) are all above the boiling point of water. I question the old brewing adages regarding the volatility of these compounds.

Stan Hieronymus has referenced it in a Zymurgy article, among other places.  I experienced the increased geraniol, which is why I now rack to secondary before dry hopping.
I've read and listened to many of Stan's articles and presentations on the topic, as well as many of his source materials and published studies. What Stan was referring to was the biotransformation that happens by the yeast, which can indeed convert linalool to geraniol. What is interesting is that there are other studies which show that yeast also convert geraniol to linalool as well. The end result of biotransformation is probably going to look different based on yeast strain, starting oil content of your hops, etc. And by getting most of your yeast out of suspension before starting your dry hops, you take biotransformation out of the equation and probably increase your repeatability and predictability in your dry hopping.

What I'm calling into question is specifically the idea that hop oils themselves are somehow fleeting and highly volatile. It just doesn't add up for me.

997
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: March 01, 2016, 08:59:26 AM »
Thanks for the info on brewer's caramel.
Here's my post from my taste and color testing when I got this in:

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=24192.msg308521

998
The end of fermentation addition enhances linalool, geraniol, and citronellol. Recently I read that those are some of the most volitile aroma compounds in beer. That agrees with your observation.
Out of curiosity, where did you get that information from? I'm of the opinion that the main benefit of dry-hopping at the end of fermentation is that less oils are pulled out of solution by adsorption to falling trub. The boiling points of the major sesquiterpine aroma compounds that we attribute to hop aroma (including the ones you mention above) are all above the boiling point of water. I question the old brewing adages regarding the volatility of these compounds.

999
All Grain Brewing / Re: Port - beer hybrid
« on: March 01, 2016, 08:22:32 AM »
Thanks y'all!

So, an English barley wine then. I've been meaning to brew one anyways.

Anyone have a link to a recipe for a particularly relevant one?

Now to find someone who knows his/her ports....my friend likes port but I'm pretty sure he doesn't know about good port yet.

For an English Barleywine of this style the recipe is really simple. 100% Maris Otter or other UK Pale Ale malt to an OG in the ballpark of 1.120. You want between 50 and 60 IBU's from something like EKG at 60 minutes, and about 0.25-0.5 oz of EKG per gallon at the end of the boil.

Pitch a big, healthy pitch of a relatively attenuative English yeast. Like lager-sized pitch or bigger. You might want to step it up more than once and increase the gravity with each step. I usually just brew a few beers of increasing gravity, and pitch the entire cake from a 1.060ish beer. Oxygenate well, then repeat in 12-18 hours. An FG around 1.030 will lend you in the realm of a port or sherry after some time to age.

1000
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: All Sour Brewing
« on: March 01, 2016, 05:37:04 AM »
To me, sours are like barley wines. They are a treat that I enjoy once or twice a month. I brew a couple of batches if each a year and that is already more than I would consume even if I didn't try any commercial examples. Thankfully both are typically suitable for cellaring.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


1001
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: February 29, 2016, 07:47:02 PM »
I ordered mine from the UK, and paid through the nose for shipping. It was a total impulse buy at the time. My impression is that it is essentially the same idea as Sinamar, but with even less flavor impact.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


1002
The Pub / Re: Coors being sued for not brewing all beer in CO
« on: February 29, 2016, 12:21:26 PM »
I really enjoyed touring the Coors brewery - bought some sweet Coors Light sweatbands.
Even though I'm not a fan of mass-market lagers, I would certainly enjoy going through a brewery tour at any of them. It's cool to see what makes the big boys tick, even if the scale and end product aren't your cup of tea.

1003
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: February 29, 2016, 12:15:39 PM »
If I could find brewer's caramel for a reasonable price, I'd use it too, but since the jury is still out on it adding any flavor I'll just let this be a pale mild.
I used enough brewer's caramel to turn Pivo Pils into a dark schwarzbier, and didn't pick up a lick of flavor. I'd consider it a colorant only.

As far as the flavor of your beer goes, I'd look for American Pale Ale malt for your base if that's an option at this point. That should at least be a bit more flavorful than regular 2-row pale malt.

For 1968, I like 68F for fermentation. For a small beer like this I could be done in a matter of days, so I'd start rousing and bumping the temperature 3 or 4 days in.

What I think really lets English beers to get away with sugar in small beers is the low carbonation level. If you plan on carbonating this like an American ale (in the 2.5 volume range) and serve it ice cold, then it will certainly seem watery. If you serve it like an English/cask ale - a bit warmer and in the 1.8-2 volume range, then you can probably get away with it.

1004
I get why people arrive at the 170* hop stand temperature.  I recently tried it at 140* specifically because Myrcene boils at 145*.  So instead of choosing the temperature based on SMM/DMS conversion and maintaining enough heat to kill stuff floating on dust, I chose the temperature based on flavor considerations. 

I have not done a side by side comparison.  That would be interesting.
Where are you getting the 145F reference for Myrcene's boiling point? I'm seeing 331F-334F:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrcene

1005
Ingredients / Re: Weyermann Barke malts
« on: February 29, 2016, 08:18:15 AM »
I bought all three Barke malts (Pils, Vienna and Munich) and plan on brewing with all three next week.

What is the Lovibond on the Munich? Do they have Light and Dark Munich varieties, or just a light one?

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