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Messages - erockrph

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991
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Paulaner Original Munich (Helles)
« on: August 19, 2015, 12:49:17 PM »
Im homing in on it. Not there yet. This winter when I continue my journey, it will be 3 parts Best pils to one part Best Vienna.  Borderline low calcium from CaCl. Aiming to the low end of hopiness, 10gm magnum at 60. Fermented with Wyeast Munich. About 4.5% abv. Adjusted in the bottling bucket to 4.3 pH.
Sounds like a tasty journey :)

What yeast strain are you using, Jim?

992
Beer Recipes / Re: new/trendy hop varieties in and I.S.A.
« on: August 19, 2015, 12:44:10 PM »
To my palate, Citra is still the king of tropical fruit, with Galaxy probably 2nd place. If you want to push the tropical fruit hard, I'd go 1 part each Citra and Galaxy, and 0.5 parts of Mosaic and Equinox. You could also use a touch of Amarillo to bring in some orange/stonefruit to fill out the fruit, or hit it with Simcoe to add back some dank/pine as a counterpoint.

993
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: keeping conan
« on: August 18, 2015, 08:55:59 PM »
You can also culture 3864 from the bottle.

But that doesn't help Homo.
Actually, it does. You can just as easily culture from your own bottle conditioned homebrew. I've done that in the past. But keeping a few jars of slurry in the fridge leaves a wider margin of error.

994
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: orange zest and bittering
« on: August 18, 2015, 11:15:08 AM »
So use ascorbic acid addition to a Lacto starter made from a handful of malt in the wort?  To lower the O2 and to inhibit aerobic bacteria strains?

It's worth an experiment at the very least. That's probably best suited if you have good, but not great, means of reducing O2 pickup (such as the Saran Wrap on the wort trick).

995
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: keeping conan
« on: August 18, 2015, 10:22:58 AM »
If you really like it and want to use it frequently, then make sure you brew with it every few months and keep the culture fresh. That's your best guarantee that you will be able to use it whenever you need.

If you just want to have it in case you want to brew with it sometime in the future, then storing under beer in the fridge will buy you anywhere from 6-24 months if you're willing to baby it early on with stepped starters. That's what I do with WY3864, which is one of my favorite yeast strains but is only released every couple of years. I like it a lot, but if for some reason I can't get a healthy starter going it's not the end of the world for me. I can use something else like 1762 or 3787 until Wyeast releases it again.

996
All Grain Brewing / Re: color of Susan
« on: August 18, 2015, 10:12:38 AM »
Haze, lighting, and a touch of aromatic malt should do it.

997
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer Writer Needs Your Opinion
« on: August 18, 2015, 10:11:01 AM »
I am a small-batch, all-grain brewer. I typically brew 3-gallon batches in my kitchen using a cooler mash tun and boiling on my stovetop. Personally, I would love to have a PicoBrew system. My biggest challenge with homebrewing is finding time to brew. Between my family and career, I don't find myself with the large blocks of free time I need for an all-grain brewday. Having a tool like the PicoBrew would let me squeeze in more brew days.

The main downside for me is the rather steep price. I enjoy the brewing process, but I'd be willing to sacrifice some of the hands-on part to free up some time. Personally, my favorite part of the hobby is designing and testing new recipes. Moving to a closed system wouldn't affect that.

I do think that it is a benefit for a brewer to get some hands-on with each step of the process. But I don't think less of someone as a brewer for using technology. Many pro's use automated systems, so I don't see why someone would look down on a homebrewer for doing so. It's a lot like using extract, or brewing a kit beer - you may give up control of part of the process, but the end product is still your creation. I am all for anything that brings new people into our hobby.

998
Beer Recipes / Re: Malty Autumn Amber with oats
« on: August 18, 2015, 05:09:19 AM »
I have some Carabrown left over from a mild that I enjoyed, think that would be fun to swap in place of the victory?
Never used it, but from the description I think it would be a tasty addition.

999
Beer Recipes / Re: Malty Autumn Amber with oats
« on: August 17, 2015, 08:07:16 PM »
Looks pretty tasty. I generally skip the Victory if I'm already using MO as my base malt, since they pretty much do the same thing. Otherwise, I'd give it a go as-is.

I brewed an oatmeal brown ale with a somewhat similar grain bill a couple of years ago and I was pretty happy with how it turned out.

1000
Beer Recipes / Re: Imperial Red IPA
« on: August 17, 2015, 06:29:46 PM »
Howdy and welcome.

That looks like a lot of C60. I'd go with zero and get my color from a little midnight wheat.
Or replace the pale malt with Red X and drop the other malts entirely.

1001
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: It's Official
« on: August 17, 2015, 05:38:05 PM »
Well, what about forums where the people are civil, but the information is just as questionable?  I just read several threads on a forum where members were told that a two liter starter that is fermented out, crashed, decanted, and fed two more liters of wort produces the same number of viable yeast cells as a 4L starter.  I almost replied to the threads, but figured that it would be a waste of time.
In the healthcare fields we refer to that as "knows just enough to be dangerous".

1002
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: orange zest and bittering
« on: August 17, 2015, 05:36:36 PM »
Ahha...thanks for that clarification.

So perhaps 10 ibu or so with hops is prudent.

Can't hurt. But to completely contradict myself, this is a style that probably wouldn't be hurt by some slowly building lactic acidity. If you skip the hops and a little lacto develops it might not be so bad either. Sounds like a fun experiment either way.

1003
Commercial Beer Reviews / Medusa Brewing Company
« on: August 17, 2015, 05:33:53 PM »
I met up with some friends up in Hudson, MA a week ago for a night out. It was my first time in that area, but it's a recently gentrified old mill town with a really promising food scene that is developing. After a great dinner and dessert, we ended up at Medusa Brewing Company. We have a lot of brewpubs down my way, but this was the first nano/taproom style brewery I've been to. The taproom was a decent size and clean & well-maintained. Entertainment was a dude on mandolin playing an eclectic mix of tunes (I don't remember his whole set, but there was some 70's Bowie at one point).

Anyways, onto the beer. They had a really nice selection, with many sessionable brews and only a couple of IPA's (one being a session IPA). I started off with Sir Terry, which is a 3.8% dark mild that goes down really easy. There were toasty/nutty malt notes with hints of fruity esters and roasty chocolate. It was a little more watery than I'd like, but there was enough of a mineral character to dry out the finish and counteract that wateriness. I made a note that it would be killer on cask. I think the carbonation level may have made it seem a bit thin.

My buddy had their 80/-. I didn't take any detailed notes, but it was damn good. I remember thinking that this is what Belhaven must taste like fresh at the brewery.

Then I had Fermette, which is a 6% saison, dry-hopped with Sorachi and Centennial. My friends (who are admittedly not beer nerds like me) all made "the face" when they tried it - "not my tastes". Then I tried it. I made "the face", too. My notes read "Lemony, soapy, meaty. Something went wrong." Soap is almost definitely the hops. I'm not quite sure where the meaty thing is coming from. I always hear that this is an autolysis issue, but any time I've experienced that it's been in an overaged beer and it's been closer to soy sauce. This was more like chicken broth.

Overall, I was pretty happy with Medusa. I will definitely stop back in next time I'm in the area. But man, I wish they would have dumped that batch of saison. They're fairly new (open less than a year from what I've been told), so I hope they learn that it's OK to dump a beer. It's less expensive in the long run to lose a batch of beer than to lose customers.


1004
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: orange zest and bittering
« on: August 17, 2015, 04:16:09 PM »

Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant, not a preservative. And there's not much in the skin of an orange - it is primarily in the juice.

You could always bitter to a low amount of IBU's with hops, then use orange peel to get the majority of your actual bitterness. That would be the best of both worlds if you're looking to go that route.

Hmm. Here's what I'm reading Eric :

Preserving Properties
Ascorbic acid neutralizes oxygen when it comes into contact with it. Oxygen allows foods to continue to ripen, an aging process similar to the one people go through that ends in death. Oxygen is also vital for many microorganisms to thrive, some of which cause decay. Ascorbic acid slows or neutralizes these events. The substance blocks cured meat’s propensity to form carcinogens called nitrosamines, for example. In the process, the vitamin also preserves the flesh’s red color. In addition, ascorbic acid preserves flavor.

Food-Preservation Mechanism
Canned vegetables, bottled juices, jams and other preserved fruit are processed foods manufacturers protect with ascorbic acid. The vitamin’s acidity makes it hard for the enzyme phenolase to act. Phenolase accelerates oxidation, a chemical process in which oxygen level rises, resulting in decay. This is also the process that ascorbic acid combats.
The preservative properties of ascorbic acid are due to its ability to scavenge oxygen. This inhibits or delays oxidation, which does enhance storage stability of food products. In particular, it helps slow the oxidation of fats, which leads to off flavors and rancidity.

Ascorbic acid is not antimicrobial. In fact, the main bacteria we are using hops to inhibit (Lactobacillis) is anaerobic. That means ascorbic acid may hypothetically be beneficial for lactobacillus by reducing the amount of oxygen in the beer. Vitamin C prevents spoilage from oxygen, rather than from microbes.

1005
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: orange zest and bittering
« on: August 17, 2015, 03:56:02 PM »
Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant, not a preservative. And there's not much in the skin of an orange - it is primarily in the juice.

You could always bitter to a low amount of IBU's with hops, then use orange peel to get the majority of your actual bitterness. That would be the best of both worlds if you're looking to go that route.

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