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Messages - mpietropaoli

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16


That's just silly. Debating the merits of low/no O2 brewing is what this thread should be about - now that we've been given the info to debate. What I meant (and what I believe Pete meant) was that.................

"Statement: These guys are jerks, just trolling.
Response: These guys are just this way because you criticize them."

.................has gotten stale and non-productive at this point.

aaaaah, my bad! 

We are in agreement there.  In Beersk's defense, I took this post as trying to get it back to the discussion you would like (the merits) as opposed to brewers/users holding grudges against the authors of the article because they are huge d!cks (whether or not they are huge d!cks is both unknown and completely irrelevant to me). 

17
I have a better idea:  I think the admins should create an icon to signify a trigger warning when anyone posts about low/no O2 brewing. 

18
I took it to mean total parts per million, not parts per million per liter (?)

The sodium is a result of the sulfate binding to the o2 and leaving the sodium ion free it seems.


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19
All this blahbittyblah, I don't see any data from Denny or anyone else either. All I see there is, "Welp! It works for me! Never had a problem!" Anecdotal. Yeah, there's been experiments, but maybe there's something to the low O2 thing that rendered those experiments worthless. It isn't crazy sounding to me.
Read it with an open mind and quit pushing back on it so much. Don't do it if you don't want to do it. I don't understand all the arguing. It's like everyone doesn't want to change what they're doing to make better beer. I see it everyday, we all fear change. I don't know if I'm going to implement any of these methods, but I'm not whining about it.

Not that I'm giving these guys the benefit of the doubt, but maybe they're d*cks because everyone here is pushing back on them so much.

You see no data from me becasue I'm not trying to prove anything.  Besides, I've already told everyone anything they want to know about my methods so they can try them for themselves.  Whether you use my methods or someone else's doesn't matter to me.  I've brewed enough and judged enough to have at least a general idea of what's going on.  I've tired many different methods.

In talking to a few of them, I'm quite certain these guys are also not out to prove anything to anyone.  But many on here seems to hold them to that standard or assume that they are. 

Also, FWIW, I wasn't personally trying to single you out Denny for your opinions and lack/abundance of data, for the exact reason you cite, which you have specified in the past. 

20

All this blahbittyblah, I don't see any data from Denny or anyone else either. All I see there is, "Welp! It works for me! Never had a problem!" Anecdotal. Yeah, there's been experiments, but maybe there's something to the low O2 thing that rendered those experiments worthless. It isn't crazy sounding to me.
Read it with an open mind and quit pushing back on it so much. Don't do it if you don't want to do it. I don't understand all the arguing. It's like everyone doesn't want to change what they're doing to make better beer. I see it everyday, we all fear change. I don't know if I'm going to implement any of these methods, but I'm not whining about it.

Not that I'm giving these guys the benefit of the doubt, but maybe they're d*cks because everyone here is pushing back on them so much.
[/quote]

Where is the 'like' button?

I think its a bit of a double standard that "its never been a problem for me" from some brewers is evidence enough, yet when someone else presents something different that works for them, the homebrew community wants gas chromatograph readouts and 500+ sample sizes.

21
Also, I thought bamforth was all about low o2 throughout (I could be mistaken)

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22
It doesn't exist.  Or, at least, not in a bad way  ;)

Have you seen what a grant or a traditional decoction look like?

This.  Plus have these guys ever listened to somebody like Charlie Bamforth, a real scientist?
Narziss and Kunze weren't scientists? Also, I didn't think many (any?) Of the German breweries were doing decoctions anymore.

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23
Bipa is a little different of an animal.  I like going more toward dank hop profile than citrus, as you have, for those.  But yes, adding some midnight wheat, black Prinz or other huskless roasted grain will get you there.

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24
On hopping, I would honestly get rid of the 10 minute additions and do 6-8 oz of simcoe Amarillo and mosaic as a hopburst/whirlpool steep.  I personally prefer hop extract or Magnum in a pinch for bittering.  Also, I would leave the mosaics out of the dry hop.  I LOVE them as a hopburst/whirlpool addition but don't love them as pure aroma.  Simcoe/Amarillo/ahantum on the other hand, will give you a great aroma.  How/when are you dry hopping?

Go 5-10% LIGHT Munich as well.  If doing single infusion, I would mash at 152F.  Ferment temp? I don't know how that yeast behaves at all.

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25
Beer Recipes / Re: First time/design American IPA
« on: March 19, 2016, 02:28:51 PM »
Not a fan of MO in American ipas, particularly a pure West coast one like you have here.  It just has a weird tangy flavor that is awesome in British beers, but not my bag here.   I would go preferably rahr 2-row or briess in a pinch.  I use all Thomas fawcett Pearle but I brew Vermont inspired ipas, which are a little different than what you have. Good advice above on hopping schedule.  Cara pils won't hurt. 

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26
The Pub / Re: Drew's Weight Loss
« on: March 19, 2016, 06:07:50 AM »
Also interested.  I was blown away after seeing a recent picture.  90% of beer drinkers I know could stand to lose a few, including myself.  Even 10% of bodyweight can really help.  Success stories are always great to hear.   Specifically id like to hear about how much beer you allowed yourself, along with how beer played into total calories, balance, etc. 

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27
Beer Recipes / Re: First Pale Ale Recipe
« on: March 10, 2016, 12:03:21 PM »
For an APA I would consider a yeast that can produce some esters.  If you ferment Chico down in the low 60's you will get a peach ester that I personally like a lot in lighter abv, crisp APA's, and it works great in a pub ale I make with it (US-05). 

I personally am a Conan man, but west coast works as well, especially as a baseline.  Since you don't brew these often, maybe split the wort after chilling and use two different yeasts?

28
Beer Recipes / Re: Doppelbock into Eisbock
« on: March 10, 2016, 11:59:40 AM »
Denny what method did you use to freeze distill?  We have about 4 gallons sitting in a corny keg.  I would prefer not to rack it again, but I can if need be. 

29
Equipment and Software / Re: Higher End Glassware Cautionary Tale
« on: February 24, 2016, 11:13:37 AM »
Green pads

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30
Equipment and Software / Higher End Glassware Cautionary Tale
« on: February 23, 2016, 10:21:12 AM »
I can't tell whether this was from abrasives (typically I either use salt or baking powder) or Scotch-Brite pads, but every 6 months or so, I would do an oxyclean soak and scrub on my Spigleau glasses (use the tulips for just about everything).  After most uses I will just spray with vinegar solution, then heavy rinse with crazy hot water, and maybe a paper towel rub. 

After spending months trying to figure out why head on my beers would quickly dissipate, I looked closer at the glasses, and noticed pretty visible scratches in the direction of my scrubbing.  Likely the cause of the head falling quickly. 

Upon reading this, I can't imagine that either salt or baking powder is harder than glass, so it must be the pads. 

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