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Messages - narvin

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Sankey D Kegs
« on: June 24, 2016, 10:30:01 AM »
You're really not going to want to start with sankey kegs.  You'll at least have to build a keg cleaner, since taking the spear out every time is a PITA.  Get some corneys.

2
Beer Travel / Re: Wash DC brew pubs tonight?
« on: June 24, 2016, 09:21:27 AM »
Right Proper is nearby, both the tasting room at the new production brewery (no food unless a food truck shows up) and the Brewpub.  Their beer is excellent.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 24, 2016, 09:16:47 AM »
I thought the crabtree effect meant that all growth in regular gravity wort was due to fermentation, and O2 was just used for building ergosterol and other during the process.  AKA there are no actual phases in fermentation unless you're propagating yeast at a very low gravity (< 1.010).

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 23, 2016, 08:18:48 PM »
I'd also add that there has been discussion in other threads about the shearing force caused by stirplates exerting some stress on the yeast that can cause off flavors. My paraphrasing may be inadequate, but my take-away was that stirplate-made starters yield off-flavored starter beer. Most people making stirplate starters have no issues if they decant or repitch that liquid into a "standard" fermentation (where ostensibly the yeast could clean up some of the damage). However, if you were applying the stirplate to the full beer, it seems you would be susceptible to the same off-flavors.



You have to spin it like a cyclone to even hit this in theory.  In practice, it doesn't happen.  Starters smell a bit estery because they are fermented warm.

I needed a big pitch for my last lager so I did two 1 gallon jugs, one on the stir plate and the other without but substituting a minute of pure O2 at the start.  It was the O2 started that smelled odd, not just oxidized but a bit harsh and phenolic.  The stir plate was fine.

At any rate, I don't think you'd get any positive effects from using it on a fermenting beer, but you probably won't see any negative ones either for the first few days.  I still think it would be interesting to try with Ringwood.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 23, 2016, 11:44:11 AM »
If you wanted to make a beer that required daily oxygenation (i.e. with Ringwood) this could help.

With a Peter Austin system, they not only perform open fermentations with Ringwood but also rouse and aerate daily.

Or it could also be useful in a super high gravity beer.  But I agree that "regular" beers don't need it.

You need to define "super high gravity".  I've made beers up to around 1.120 using "normal" techniques and they turned out fine.  I can't see any advantage to this over occasional rousing.

Well, I was thinking of an 18%+ beer.  I hear incremental feedings and aeration help.  But I've never felt like I wanted to make one so I haven't tried any of the tricks.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 23, 2016, 10:54:53 AM »
If you wanted to make a beer that required daily oxygenation (i.e. with Ringwood) this could help.

With a Peter Austin system, they not only perform open fermentations with Ringwood but also rouse and aerate daily.

Or it could also be useful in a super high gravity beer.  But I agree that "regular" beers don't need it.

7
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO 2 Questions
« on: June 22, 2016, 01:44:34 PM »
CO2 in your tank is liquid, so the pressure will be constant for a given temperature until all of the liquid has evaporated into gas.  At this point, you're almost empty, so the high pressure gauge is not very useful.

At room temperature, if you have any liquid CO2 left you'll read 816 psi.


The CO2 in the tank is gas over liquid, to be more exact. I think you know that from the rest of your post.

Yes, that's a good thing to point out.  The liquid is evaporating into gas as it is released from the tank, leaving more gas and less liquid.

This is also why tanks that you fill other tanks from have a dip tube.

Until enough liquid has been removed that only gas is left, the temperature and pressure are tied together on the black line between liquid and gas:


8
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO 2 Questions
« on: June 22, 2016, 01:35:10 PM »
In theory, a 5lb tank should last a while. 

At STP, 1 mole of CO2 (or any gas) is 22.4L.  This equates to 1.96g of CO2 per liter.  2.5 volumes of CO2 is 2.5L of CO2 at stp per L of beer.  Assuming your beer has maybe 1 vol of CO2 before you carbonate to 2.5L, and then you push it out at the same pressure, filling the entire keg with CO2, you'd use 4 L of CO2 per L of beer.  This is around 76 Liters per keg.  5 pounds at 1.96 g/L equates to 1157L, which is 15 kegs at that rate.

I'm sure there are some simplifications (or mistakes  >:() here, but it seems like a good estimate.

9
The Pub / Re: Curse is over in cleveland
« on: June 22, 2016, 08:00:11 AM »
"Cavaliers invite Bernie Kosar to ride in victory parade"

Well now it's just getting sad.  If anything, this will start a new curse.

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO 2 Questions
« on: June 22, 2016, 06:25:12 AM »
CO2 in your tank is liquid, so the pressure will be constant for a given temperature until all of the liquid has evaporated into gas.  At this point, you're almost empty, so the high pressure gauge is not very useful.

At room temperature, if you have any liquid CO2 left you'll read 816 psi.


11
The Pub / Re: What's the Weather Like Where You Are?
« on: June 21, 2016, 02:38:08 PM »
It was 99, then we had the most insane thunderstorm I've ever seen (with tornado watch), and now it's 77.   :o

12
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg tap beer comes out very very slowly.
« on: June 21, 2016, 11:36:28 AM »
I still think it's due to hop debris.  It usually happens at the poppit valve, not in the dip tube, so pushing CO2 back in through the beer out post would clear it temporarily.  If you take off the post you'll see if it's clogged.

13
There is nothing wrong with using a thermowell.  The temperature of the wort is what matters, and you should be able to keep it within 1 degree of your target, since it has a lot of thermal mass.

It sounds like something may be wrong with your setup.  If the cooling delta on the temp controller is set higher than 1, it won't come on until temperature reaches your set point plus the delta.  As for the heating, you have it set too tight. Do you even need heating?

14
Ingredients / Re: Pekko Hops
« on: June 18, 2016, 06:58:23 PM »
She could be a goddess.  Have you seen the original Starbucks logo?

Although, the days could be considered insensitive to dwarfs.

15
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: June 16, 2016, 09:00:10 AM »
Brewing a German Pils with my new sack of Barke malt on Sunday.  Wish I had some brewtan... Denny, why weren't you handing out little ziplock baggies of it at the conference?  I'm sure the TSA wouldn't have thought that odd.

Ya know, if either of us had thought of it, I could have introduced you to the guy I got it from.  He had packs he was handing out.

D'OH!

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