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Messages - narvin

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16
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Reconfirm: I HATE White Labs new packaging
« on: February 10, 2018, 03:08:51 PM »
Yeah... it's like toothpaste, which I don't really like.  But I've dealt with it by using a funnel and squeezing it out first, then adding the starter wort through the funnel to wash it down.  I hadn't really thought about the hand thing but drying it first sees like the way to go.

17
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 10, 2018, 03:04:17 PM »
I'll also say that I had a two hearted recently and thought "Wow, this is malty."  So it a) either wasn't very fresh, or b) my tastes have moved towards less (or no) crystal malt in an IPA.  Either way, I don't see how a typical NEIPA would taste sweet, except for the ones that go for the extreme "no bitterness" end of the spectrum due to the balance.  But still, I'd think they finish at a lower gravity than the old school American IPAs like Two Hearted.

18
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 10, 2018, 02:58:48 PM »
I swear these "no IBU" fruit bomb "IPA's" are for people that would rather have a wine cooler but are too embarrassed to order one  :D  :D. But seriously, tons of residual sugar, huge body, no bitterness and fruitiness out the ying yang, that sounds like Bartles and James not an IPA.

Any specific examples you're talking about?  Obviously they exist but I think many other IPAs have improved vs 10 years ago due to better packaging/freshness, more late hops, and fewer residual sugars/crystal malts.

these neipa that use super fruity hop varieties, super fruity, low attenuating yeast and high chloride water. It makes for a fruity and insipid drink for my tastes. They taste like wine coolers.

Any specific examples? I've had some from Hill Farmstead, Trillium, etc. that are obviously crafted very well and taste great. Obviously you get turds as outliers but the well made versions are worth seeking out.

Indeed, Trillium is one of my favorites.  Not insipid at all.  Crisip and bright, with some bitterness but the hop flavors are varied and extremely fresh.

19
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 04:45:55 PM »
I swear these "no IBU" fruit bomb "IPA's" are for people that would rather have a wine cooler but are too embarrassed to order one  :D  :D. But seriously, tons of residual sugar, huge body, no bitterness and fruitiness out the ying yang, that sounds like Bartles and James not an IPA.

Any specific examples you're talking about?  Obviously they exist but I think many other IPAs have improved vs 10 years ago due to better packaging/freshness, more late hops, and fewer residual sugars/crystal malts.

20
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 04:18:29 PM »
The cloudy/milkshake thing is overdone.  But I will say that I've been drinking more IPAs since they have started to 1) focus on freshness, 2) reduce the abv somewhat to reasonable levels of historical IPAs, and 3) move a little bit away from the "bitterness masochism challenge" that was a fad for a while.

In fact, I think my go to beers now are split between medium abv late hop IPAs and Pilsners  :)

21
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Biotransformation
« on: February 06, 2018, 04:56:55 PM »
This Palmer interview was one of the best interviews on NEIPA I have heard so far.  I agreed with him on just about everything he said.  Where Palmer went wrong was that he failed to explain that there are different types of "bioconversions".  The word "bioconversion" is a rather generic word for any biochemical transformation that is biologically driven (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioconversion).  Fermentation is a form of bioconversion, for example.  The study that Palmer was talking about looked specifically at the enzymatic hydrolysis of glycosides, the Luk Daenen study.  Luk Daenen published a study that found that out of over a hundred strains, there was very weak support for beta-glucosidase in S. cerevisiae, and one strain of Brettanomyces anomalus that had strong activity.  So Palmer is right, there is no evidence for beta-glucosidase activity in ale yeast.

But that isn't the full story.  The 2003 study that was linked showed that there are other bioconversions happening.  They HAVE to be happening because the hops don't contain the compounds that are being found in the finished beer.  There are a lot of different biotransformations of hop compounds during fermentation.  In many cases, they don't know how or why, but there is something going on.  This is a completely separate issue from glycosides though (although in some of these papers, glycosidic reactions have been hypothesized as the cause).

Here are some reviews I've written on the Shellhammer and Daenen studies on these two topics:
http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Glycosides
http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Hops#Hop_Derived_Compounds_In_Beer_and_Biotransformations

That's cool, thanks for the links.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Biotransformation
« on: February 06, 2018, 04:56:14 PM »
It's also possible that other factors are having an effect.  I'd expect less oxidation from adding hops during fermentation.  The two aren't mutually exclusive, though. 

23
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: February 03, 2018, 05:52:57 AM »
They aren't selling anything other than the basic stuff to welders, and beverage grade is the same.  So, don't pay any extra for food or beverage grade, but recognize that you have only 3 9s of purity.  That's not very high when you look at it in ppm.

24
Equipment and Software / Re: Kettle condenser in lieu of ventilation
« on: February 01, 2018, 05:22:33 PM »
While it can arrest a lot of the humidity, it wouldn't do anything with the hop and malt aromas. If you can live with that, it could be an option. I'll keep my vent hood.

Good, that's the best part!

25
Equipment and Software / Kettle condenser in lieu of ventilation
« on: February 01, 2018, 04:47:35 PM »
After a mini-hiatus due to moving I'm working on setting up an electric brewery in the basement.  I saw this idea here https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/boil-kettle-condenser-no-overhead-ventilation-needed.636955 and thought it looked freakin cool.  Definitely better than doing the work to install a big noisy vent hood in an already finished basement, and it lets you dial back the boil electricity as well.  DMS?  I'm not worried about any DMS  :)

Getting everything up and running is still a ways off but I'll keep you posted if I try it.

26
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: January 26, 2018, 09:09:35 PM »
Spunding is the obvious fix for force carbonation, but what about when you start serving?  I would think that O2 diffusion would happen even after beer is carbonated when impure CO2 is used for serving.

Have you looked into any type of CO2 purifier, since I don't think homebrewers really have access to a legitimate source of high-purity CO2?  Or, do you think a bag in a box / party pig style keg would improve shelf life?

27
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: AB sending water to help flood victems
« on: August 31, 2017, 01:56:35 PM »

28
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: "We Might Have Been Wrong About FWH"
« on: August 18, 2017, 01:18:09 AM »
I also wouldn't say that first wort hopping is "traditional".  It may have been rediscovered in the 90s but if you listen to Yvan De Baets, all of the great Belgian beers had already begun their decline by then.  8)

29
The Pub / Re: Guess I'm not gonna be a star....
« on: August 05, 2017, 06:10:19 PM »
It could have been fun... You could play a character nothing like yourself to get famous (i.e. rich) with rubes around America like Duck Dynasty, Larry the Cable Guy, etc.

30
The Pub / Re: Shrubs
« on: July 26, 2017, 10:19:17 PM »
Making kombucha is so easy... if you're already buying it raw, you can just pour the dregs into a sugar/tea mix and start your own scoby.  I agree that you might end up with more than you want to drink, but it's worth trying.  If nothing else you'll save $5 a few times  :)

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