Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - narvin

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 146
31
Assuming that the best CO2 you can get is 30 ppm, this is 30 mg/L.  If your beer happens to be around 1 volume of CO2 (a swag) before carbing to 2.5, you'd be adding 1.5 volumes, so that would end up being 45 ppm in your final beer I'd think.

I know that theoretically this could be significant, but the effect was stark when experienced.  Has anyone tried measuring the DO content of deoxygenated water that was then carbonated?  Might be interesting to see and could be accomplished with a soda bottle and carboy cap.  It's possible that much of the CO2 sold from welding shops as beverage grade is anything but.

32
So I was sick of sending water down the drain with my wort chiller, so I opened my window, put my wort chiller drain tube out the window, and stuffed it into my hose (a perfect fit, but used some duck tape to hold it in place) and watered my lawn with sprinkler. The Faucet pressure was not nearly as high as the garden hose hook up outside, but it was enough to pressure to make the sprinkler slooooowly oscillate and water the lawn! Got to feel good about chilling my beer and not wasting water. Took a couple pictures, but I can't figure out how to attach them.

I can't get past the fact that you are concerned with saving water but you water your lawn.

Well, if you already have a lawn, the proper care of it can have an impact on its health and the health of the planet.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/Lawn/lawn3.php
Point taken.

Of course I agree that there are likely a lot of people who over-water and fertilize.  But this was something interesting I saw the other day, so I figured I'd share  :)

33
I'm also not sure that what I'm getting is food grade, or that the filling of the bottle hasn't created some increased O2 content.  Of course, I always ask if it's beverage grade, and they say yes wherever I buy it, but...

34
On day 3, the beer was already cold.  It's possible that a large amount of oils/yeast bound to hops dropped to the bottom by then and were consumed.  However:

1) Even the very last pint was amazing that night.
2) 2 days later, it seems likely that more would have dropped to the bottom and would have been pulled by the diptube in the first pint.
3) The beer is still quite cloudy now.

35
That's interesting. I guess I'm not sure what the sulfites and ascorbic acid is supposed to accomplish that you don't get by pushing sanitizer out with CO2. Would you mind explaining your thought process behind that?

Also, is it possible that the temperature change may be behind it? Did you crash before dry hopping and kegging? Any chance the hop oils bound to some particles that dropped out?

Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

The idea is that the CO2 we buy as food/beverage grade is only 99% pure (or so... would have to look up the specifics).  Even if a fraction of that 1% is air, that is a significant dissolved oxygen to add when you're carbing to 2.5 volumes.

36
So I was sick of sending water down the drain with my wort chiller, so I opened my window, put my wort chiller drain tube out the window, and stuffed it into my hose (a perfect fit, but used some duck tape to hold it in place) and watered my lawn with sprinkler. The Faucet pressure was not nearly as high as the garden hose hook up outside, but it was enough to pressure to make the sprinkler slooooowly oscillate and water the lawn! Got to feel good about chilling my beer and not wasting water. Took a couple pictures, but I can't figure out how to attach them.

I can't get past the fact that you are concerned with saving water but you water your lawn.

Well, if you already have a lawn, the proper care of it can have an impact on its health and the health of the planet.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/Lawn/lawn3.php

37
I don't mean that I drank 20 pints a day, or invited my friends over and they enthusiastically "helped" me drink it all. 

This was the first batch where I dry hopped at the end of primary fermentation.  8 ounces per carboy went in on day 4 with ~5 points left to ferment.  Most of the IBUs came from a whirlpool charge, with only a tiny bittering addition.  10 days later I kegged, using my standard routine of pushing out sanitizer (iodiphor) with CO2.  Pushing out of the fermenter was also done completely under CO2 pressure.  It tasted great warm and flat from the keg... wonderful hop flavors.

On day 3, with just a hint of carbonation, it was amazing.  The full flavor came out.  Hop oil biotransformations were REAL!  I couldn't get enough of it.  Every last drop was delicious (and I think I had more than a couple glasses of it).  The next day I hurt (too much of a good thing), but a day later was Friday and I couldn't wait to get home and drink some more.  Well... they were gone.  All of the amazing flavors.  It was a standard, decent IPA at this point, but nothing like it was before.  This was a split batch with a friend, and he confirmed that his keg had also lost the majority of it's fresh hop flavor and aroma.

I can only conclude that force carbonation was the culprit.  Not even the transfer, but the carbonation process itself.  We know that whatever CO2 we get as homebrewers is not 100% pure.  The beer was incredible until it started to absorb CO2, and then it fell off a cliff.  Again, it's still a good IPA, and if I never tasted it before carbonation completed I wouldn't have known its potential.  But all of the fresh hop flavors have completely transformed to a more bitter, dull, and harsh flavor.

This is probably what I was used to in the past, even from some commercial breweries, so I never questioned it.  But at this point I don't think I'll force carb any of my beers ever again.  I'm looking into doing some tests on a split batch with force carbing with ascorbic acid and sulfites vs spunding with keg hops.  I'd rather not bother with hops in the keg but if it's the best solution, it will be worth it.

38
All Grain Brewing / Re: Dealing with Protein/Chill Haze
« on: June 06, 2017, 07:49:42 AM »
Any beer benefits from cold conditioning time... the colder, the better (within reason).  Without that, it is hard to coagulate and drop out chill haze.

I'd also suggest you try kettle finings again and try to separate the hot break completely from the fermenter.  Chill haze is caused by excess proteins and polyphenols in the beer.  Brewtan B is another thing to play around with, since tannins (polyphenols) help to precipitate proteins as well.

http://byo.com/malt/item/486-conquer-chill-haze

39
Classifieds / Re: PICOBREW ZYMATIC FOR SALE BRAND NEW PARTS ONLY READ
« on: June 04, 2017, 06:23:53 AM »
At this point you should take it back to amazon and tell them that it's stolen.  Auction or no, they shouldn't be selling stolen property.  They were likely unaware (or, more likely didn't care to look into it).

40
The Pub / Re: My nomination for biggest piece of SH!T in America
« on: June 02, 2017, 11:26:20 AM »
As most of you have probably seen on the news a week ago a man on a light rail train in Portland was verbally assaulting a couple of high school girls, one black and one wearing a muslim headscarf. Three other men on the train stepped in to try and calm the man down; he stabbed all three of them, killing two of them.
He's not the nominee.
The nominee is the mother***ker who stole the backpack and the wedding ring from one of the dead guys. The light rail station surveillance video clearly shows the guy with the stolen backpack.

That's messed up.  A decent nominee, but he has serious competition this year.

41
All Grain Brewing / Re: Understanding Diastatic power
« on: May 25, 2017, 03:44:44 PM »
The only reason I don't want to jump straight to oxidation is that I feel like a bit of oxidation hasn't negatively affected my dark beers, especially ones based on Munich malt.

It could be a combination of recipe (too much crystal) and oxidation.

42
All Grain Brewing / Re: Understanding Diastatic power
« on: May 25, 2017, 03:39:01 PM »
Caramel flavor is signature oxidation.  Munich is doughy, soft pretzel or outside of a soft pretzel.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It could be this. It could be under-attenuation of converted sugars due to yeast health.  It could be something else.  But I'd guess that it has nothing to do with DP.  Unconverted starches are not going to be caramel sweet.

43
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottle Spunding Trappist Ales
« on: May 25, 2017, 03:36:31 PM »
I didn't read the whole thread (apologies) but I think that the centrifuge is key in this application. Bottling without any fining is going to leave a lot of yeast, and other things (ppolyphenols?) in the bottle.  Spunding will only increase the amount of sediment.

With time in the fridge, this isn't a problem, but I don't know that you're gaining much benefit over typical priming that already scavenges oxygen for transfer.

44
My parents had some Seagrams that was still from Canada (early 80s vintage) in their liquor cabinet a few years ago.  Interesting tasting... the Old Granddad was better, though.  :)

45
The Pub / Re: Wicked Weed purchased by AB
« on: May 12, 2017, 05:47:57 PM »
They won't change anything until growth stops.  At that point, any and all cost cutting measures are on the table, including consolidating facilities.  It has happened time and time again, and is an inevitability, really.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 146