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Messages - narvin

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901
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Uh-oh... Leaky Keg Blues
« on: July 08, 2011, 05:22:40 AM »
I agree with Tom, banging the lip of the keg with a hammer has helped me fix a keg that wouldn't seal around the lid.

A spray bottle of star san is very helpful for finding leaks.

902
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Opinions on aeration system
« on: July 07, 2011, 03:55:02 PM »
As for it affecting the flavor profile of the finished beer, like you pointed out it is just one of the things you can manipulate to get the flavor profile you want.

Definitely, as long as you can adjust it in a reproducible way.

I'm just cautiously pointing out that more oxygen may not always be better.  More is different, and for your hefeweizen, more may be worse  :)

903
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Opinions on aeration system
« on: July 07, 2011, 01:22:57 PM »
As lagers become more of my brewing portfolio, one soon realizes that O2 will get you to the 10-12 ppm often quoted that you need for lager yeast.  Using air you can only get to about 8 ppm.

FWIW, the saturation point at 50°F is ~12 ppm, so if you're chilling before aerating you can also get to the recommended levels for a lager.

Sean,
I'm not disagreeing with you, but I've read elsewhere that "too much oxygenation of the wort can be detrimental to yeast." 
How is this possible if the saturation point at 50°F is ~12 ppm?
Because what you read is technically true but taken out of context.  You can't saturate the wort with enough O2 to harm your yeast.  If you constantly use O2 while growing your yeast you may overwhelm their metabolism and cause damage.  Since we don't constantly pump in O2 it is not an issue.

I don't know...  you can theoretically get to 40+ ppm with pure O2, and I have heard that there's the possibility of oxygen toxicity.  In practice I'd be much more worried about affecting the flavor profile than harming the yeast.  Pitching rate, temperature, and aeration are all factors that affect the flavor of the final beer, and adjusting any one will change the result.  I would be very careful about using too much oxygen in any beer that is supposed to derive a lot of character from the yeast.

904
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Opinions on aeration system
« on: July 07, 2011, 12:43:09 PM »
As lagers become more of my brewing portfolio, one soon realizes that O2 will get you to the 10-12 ppm often quoted that you need for lager yeast.  Using air you can only get to about 8 ppm.

FWIW, the saturation point at 50°F is ~12 ppm, so if you're chilling before aerating you can also get to the recommended levels for a lager.

Sean,
I'm not disagreeing with you, but I've read elsewhere that "too much oxygenation of the wort can be detrimental to yeast."  
How is this possible if the saturation point at 50°F is ~12 ppm?

That's the saturation point using air, not O2.  He's saying that you can get to 12 ppm using only air if you chill the wort first since the solubility increases.

905
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Opinions on aeration system
« on: July 07, 2011, 07:44:23 AM »
I'm starting to experiment with pure O2.  I want to see if it has a positive effect on lager fermentations.  My ales are great, but it might save me some time.  I'm not sure I'd switch to O2 for any of my Belgian styles, though. 

I got a welding tank and a low flow medical regulator off of ebay that has the welding CGA-540 fitting (yes, they exist).  I get a lot of foam at 1 LPM, so it seems to me like it's basically a waste of O2.  According to the BYO article that has been posted a few times, you theoretically only need 60 seconds at .2 LPM to hit 8 ppm.

I'm going to do a side by side experiment on a German pils that I'm brewing this weekend.  I'm aiming for 12-15 ppm, so one carboy will get 90 seconds at .25 LPM, and the other 90 seconds at 1 LPM. 

906
I have seen several commercial filtartion system on teh commercial side and they are 3 stage, but they are running at a much higher rate. So I would think that chloramines could be removed by a whole house filter as well.

A higher flow rate, but aren't they also the size of a small horse?

I use a filter exclusively and have had good results, but my water supply just uses Chlorine (for now), so I'm only speculating.

But maybe it depends on the amount of phenols produced by the yeast as well.  An APA might taste fine, but a Belgian Tripel might not.  And I've had some terrible Tripels by American breweries...

907
No, I'm not saying you shuldn't use campden. I'm just saying that filters work just as well (as in someone mentioned that they ran their water to a trickle and still got bandaid). And I don't believe that chloramines are as much of an issue as everyone says. I thought they would not boil out of solution, but that they could be filtered out just find. Please fix my understanding, but if that is the case then how in the world do large commercial breweries get the chloramine out their water? Surely you guys don't think they are using campden?

Super fancy filtration systems?  Isn't everything better at the commercial level?  ;)

908
All Grain Brewing / Re: Saison Brew Day
« on: July 06, 2011, 06:35:58 AM »
I'd mash lower... 145 wouldn't be too low.  Also, if you're basing it off of Saison Dupont, you'll want the Dupont strain, which is 3724.  If you stick with the French Saison strain, you don't need to ferment as hot (or mash as low).

909
All Things Food / Re: My Drunk Kitchen
« on: July 05, 2011, 08:07:04 PM »
She's the shazizzle.  8)  But my wife would probably think I love her like she thinks I love RR.  :-\

If your wife is jealous of Russian River, maybe she should learn to brew some awesome beers instead of taking it out on you.

910
I'd still use a charcoal filter, by the way, since it can help with other things.  If something tastes bad in water, it will taste bad in beer.

911
I was referring more to the canister's efficiency in stripping out chloramine.  I'm not worried about the rest.

Unless you trickle the water through the canister extremely slowly, it's basically buying you nothing.  Campden tabs are cheap.

If that were the case, then an in-line canister filter for home (like the ones found attached to a well filtration system) are useless too.  Not trying to be argumentative, I'm just trying to understand the effectiveness of a active charcoal canister filter.


They are plenty useful -- for making water taste better.  They aren't useful in removing chloramine completely, which is bad for beer making since chlorophenols have a low taste threshold.

912
The Pub / Re: Monster-in-law
« on: July 02, 2011, 09:43:22 PM »
Grammar is fun!  In my extremely humble opinion, none is plural in this case because it does refer to more than one instance of us.

—Usage note
Since none  has the meanings “not one” and “not any,” some insist that it always be treated as a singular and be followed by a singular verb: The rescue party searched for survivors, but none was found.  However, none  has been used with both singular and plural verbs since the 9th century. When the sense is “not any persons or things” (as in the example above), the plural is more common: … none were found.  Only when none  is clearly intended to mean “not one” or “not any” is it followed by a singular verb: Of all my articles, none has received more acclaim than my latest one.

913
The Pub / Re: Monster-in-law
« on: July 02, 2011, 09:36:36 PM »
To be even clearer, some of the responses in that thread were probably written before others were edited and/or deleted by moderators.

914
All Grain Brewing / Re: First All Grain Batch
« on: July 02, 2011, 09:34:05 PM »
Yep, a gal. for the mash and 6 gal. for the sparge just doesn't seem right.  And your sparge water should be more like 185-190F, not 168.

That seems high for sparge water temp doesn't it?  I thought general consensus was that sparge water above 170F would extract tannins?  Are you assuming some amount of temperature loss for a batch sparge or something?

If you're batch sparging, there is more temperature loss because you add only enough water as will be drained. Sparge water heated to 185 added to a drained grain bed that was at 150 seems to settle at or below 170 in my experience.

915
You buy something that you lack the required prescription for on ebay... to use as a low-flow regulator for an O2 tank to aerate your wort.

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