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Messages - narvin

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961
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: AHA Financials
« on: October 10, 2014, 10:56:39 AM »
Wow... I had no idea things go so contentious in the 90s.

http://hbd.org/hbd/archive/2753.html#2753-15

962
All Grain Brewing / Re: Alternative to lactic acid
« on: October 09, 2014, 07:24:18 PM »
Most homebrew supply shops sell 10% phosphoric acid.  You need to use more of it than lactic, but it's incredibly safe.  Phosphoric acid is the main ingredient (along with sugar and water) in cola.

963
Equipment and Software / Re: Wanted: Homebrewers Consumer Reports
« on: October 08, 2014, 08:09:58 AM »
The induction range is a great idea, and I've considered it but currently brewing outside the propane burner is more convenient.  Maybe in the future when I have room for an indoor brew rig.

Although, I could buy a lot of propane for the price of a good induction cooktop that can hold a large kettle.

964
Equipment and Software / Re: Wanted: Homebrewers Consumer Reports
« on: October 08, 2014, 07:48:13 AM »
The induction range is a great idea, and I've considered it but currently brewing outside the propane burner is more convenient.  Maybe in the future when I have room for an indoor brew rig.

965
Equipment and Software / Re: Wanted: Homebrewers Consumer Reports
« on: October 08, 2014, 06:49:39 AM »

What does a clad bottom have to do with the situation you describe?

Mainly it means I have to crank up the burner to the max to get a good boil.  And it makes the pot heavy.  Clad bottoms are great for not burning stew, but for brewing it just makes thing inefficient.  I'm semi-serious, though, when I say that I'd rather quit brewing than pay the price for a Blichmann kettle  ;)

966
All Grain Brewing / Re: How long is a FWH?
« on: October 07, 2014, 11:01:31 PM »
As far as IBUs, science has proven that you get more IBUs out of FWH than conventional bittering hop additions, and that the flavor difference

Well, to be pedantic "science" did not prove anything about the flavor.  A single experiment conducted using the scientific method showed a taste difference, but there's really no statistical significance here, or an analysis  of the complexities of taste.

If science could even prove what beer flavor is, that would be a major breakthrough.  But we can barely quantify how hundreds of different chemical compounds combine to make a single flavor.

967
Equipment and Software / Re: Wanted: Homebrewers Consumer Reports
« on: October 07, 2014, 10:31:22 PM »
My first kettle was a keggle (that was long before keg theft was a problem).  I used my keggle for exactly five batches before giving it away. I would quit brewing before going back to using a keggle.

Well, that sounds dramatic.  I hope all of your brewing endeavors aren't so precarious.

I currently use a 20 gallon stock pot, stainless, with an aluminum core bottom.  It's fine. 

Except:

-The fatter the kettle, the more wort loss when siphoning off the break/hop trub.  Especially with a flat bottom.

-Even with the clad bottom, a bayou classic burner can be undersized when there's wind (without a screen).

-Once I get a rolling boil going, boil off pushes 20% due the the large open surface area which is high unless you don't care about your final volume.


I'm actually considering going back to a keggle, especially since it would weigh less, boil faster without the BS clas bottom, and fit better in my upstairs closet that has to hold my brewing equipment.  The only reason I have a 20 gallon pot for 10 gallon batches is the above failings.

968
Pimp My System / Re: My automated brew system
« on: October 07, 2014, 08:45:48 PM »
This is great.  I especially like the bucket heater for sparge water.  Do you have any wiring diagrams?

969
Copper is good.  In fact, Belgian brewers will tell you that they specifically keep copper mash tuns in their brand new system (Bavik) to get the trace metals into the wort.  You also see a lot of copper coolships...Not that different (in a way) from a copper chiller.

970
Beer Travel / Re: Belgium Tour Options
« on: October 07, 2014, 12:00:52 PM »
I'd looked at his site and never saw any tours listed for Belgium, just the GABF.  Maybe I'll contact him.

The tour I was on was arranged by Global Beer Network, but they don't have another one until next September. Not sure if he has anything else coming up next year.

 I think we hit 15 breweries in 9 days, and twice as many bars/restaurants.

971
Beer Travel / Re: Belgium Tour Options
« on: October 06, 2014, 02:12:55 PM »
If you're looking for a tour guide in Belgium, contact Regnier (http://www.regniersbeertours.com/contact).  I just got back from a 9 day tour of Belgium that he led and it was fantastic.  Great planning, lots of interesting locations (not just the big places), and tons of insider knowledge.

I don't see any currently planned group tours, but I think he's also available as a private guide. 

972
Ingredients / Re: Advice about water report
« on: October 06, 2014, 12:56:55 PM »
Have you considered using the pre-softner water? A high quality carbon filter should remove most of the iron? I know when I lived in a house with a softner, only the cold water lines that ran to inside faucets were treated. Hose bibs outside and all hot water was not.

I didn't think a carbon filter would remove iron.  Are you sure that's the problem?  If it's sediment, a filter would help.

973
Ingredients / Re: Advice about water report
« on: October 06, 2014, 08:28:37 AM »
I would definitely try brewing with the softened water.  You don't have as much sodium after softening as some people do.  You'll know after one batch whether you like it or not.

If you don't like the result, you can buy RO.  Do you have a grocery store that sells RO in bulk?  It's cheap but somewhat inconvenient, but if you only buy enough to dilute your water 50% it's not as much to carry home.

974
Beer Recipes / Re: Pilsner Help
« on: October 06, 2014, 08:19:57 AM »

975
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Tank Size
« on: October 06, 2014, 08:16:51 AM »
Just got a 20lb tank for the downstairs lagering fridge.  It was free from a homebrewing friend who was doing work on some old union shop and found 10 of them in the basement that the owners wanted to get rid of.

I have a 5lb tank for my kegerator built into a wooden bar, since it fits in the fridge.  Also use another 5lb tank as a backup, for transfering out of the fermenter under pressure, and for my serial killer bolt gun murder apparatus.

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