Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - narvin

Pages: 1 ... 64 65 [66] 67 68 ... 151
976
The Pub / Re: I now officially hate UPS
« on: October 16, 2014, 01:31:02 AM »

You can't tax gifts. 

False, but there is an annual exclusion amount for gifts.

977
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 16, 2014, 01:26:30 AM »

A lot of brewers make the mistake of brewing a big beer with yeast grown in 1.040 gravity wort.  Pitching a culture grown in 1.040 wort into 1.087 wort seriously stresses the yeast cells.   A better approach is to pitch the vial into 1L of 1.030 gravity wort, wait twelve to eighteen hours, chill and decant the supernatant (a.k.a the clear liquid that lies above the slurry), and then pitch the slurry into 3 liters of 1.060 wort.  Using this process, we are also increasing osmotic pressure with each step.

There are no hard and fast rules, but I would say that in most cases the mistake is making a high gravity starter.

The starter was well within the ratio of growth (4X at most). The gravity was low, the way every yeast lab propagates yeast.  The idea is that you can pitch the correct number of cells, grown in ideal conditions (LOW GRAVITY WORT).

Whether or not this is always true is another deal.  540 is one of the few where I've had any problem at all with starter grown yeast.  However, I would never encourage someone to make high gravity starters.  But obviously certain yeasts benefit more than others from growing in brewing conditions.

978
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Bru'n water PH using German Melanoiden
« on: October 16, 2014, 01:14:03 AM »
Can you post your water profile and the recipe?

Have you tried Kai's spreadsheet? A lot of Martin's work was based on experiments done by Kai, and yet I often get different results from the two.

http://braukaiser.com

979
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 15, 2014, 06:31:44 PM »
In limited experience, I've also seen "underattenuation" (at least in terms of what Rochefort gets) with the first generation of this yeast.  Doing a 6 -> 8 -> 10 clone series repitching from one to the next resulted in much better attenuation.

980
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast starter time question
« on: October 14, 2014, 11:09:43 PM »
If one examines a Peter Austin designed/Alan Pugsley installed brewery closely, one finds a device that I like to refer to as a Yorkshire shower head.  This device is used to rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation (yes, I said rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation), as can be seen at time 0:12 in this video shot at the Blacksheep Brewery in North Yorkshire: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJmLNj14C_w.   It can also be seen in the following video, which was shot a Peter Austin designed /Alan Pugsley built brew pub in Baltimore, Maryland: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGIThQ7w0ls (the device is also used to aerate wort).

Yep, Steve Jones at Oliver's/Pratt Street Ale House in Baltimore (about a block from Camden Yards) still uses Ringwood and open fermenters in the 20 year old system... however, they're finally moving production out of the basement of the 1800s building to a dedicated brewery to expand capacity.  I hope they stick with open fermenters though.

He gets beastly atteuation and never has what I'd call "excessive" diacetyl for the style, and I think the rousing/aeration is definitely a big factor.

981
The Pub / Re: Pay to Play - Pretty Things Rant!
« on: October 14, 2014, 09:07:09 PM »
Angry response from "The Lower Depths" bar:

https://app.box.com/s/f7pk06ins2dpbg4zdlkl

982
The Pub / Re: Pay to Play - Pretty Things Rant!
« on: October 14, 2014, 02:29:43 PM »
So the breweries are paying the bars directly, or through their distributors?  Seems to me that a good distributor would want to get their beers out there, so the brewery itself wouldn't need to do this.  Do they have a three-tier system in Massachusetts?

983
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: October 13, 2014, 10:00:51 PM »
Got the brew in yesterday, now the rain is back.  Thanks brew gods!

984
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: October 11, 2014, 04:11:28 PM »
It's raining... I was hoping to get my first brew in since mid-summer but it will have to wait for tomorrow.  I'm planning a hoppy Belgian blond in the style of Hommerlbier... yum.

985
Equipment and Software / Re: 15.5 gal stainless fermenter
« on: October 11, 2014, 02:18:12 AM »
Pbw through spray nozzles works wonders to remove stubborn krausen gunk.  Carboy washer hasn't failed me yet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MDBdirxAZ0

986
Equipment and Software / Re: 15.5 gal stainless fermenter
« on: October 10, 2014, 10:36:55 PM »
Cleaning pretty easy?

Yes, I already have a carboy/keg washer that I build, and the opening where the spear would be is slightly larger than a standard carboy. 

987
Equipment and Software / Re: 15.5 gal stainless fermenter
« on: October 10, 2014, 07:24:45 PM »
Yep, another bonus is that it will fit in a 5 cu. ft freezer, while a conical would require something larger than I have space for in my laundry room.

988
Equipment and Software / 15.5 gal stainless fermenter
« on: October 10, 2014, 06:07:52 PM »
http://www.beveragefactory.com/draftbeer/home_brew/kegs/Kegco_KEG1215_drop_in_valve.html

Yep, it's a keg. Take the spear out and you effectively have a large stainless carboy.

You can hook up a fancy stainless apparatus for racking/thermowell/airlock on the top if you want since a 2" tri-clamp fits on a Sankey. Some places sell them pre-assembled, but it's going to cost as much as the keg itself.  I just use a carboy cap with a large hose clamp around it and it can hold enough pressure for racking.


989
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: AHA Financials
« on: October 10, 2014, 05:56:39 PM »
Wow... I had no idea things go so contentious in the 90s.

http://hbd.org/hbd/archive/2753.html#2753-15

990
All Grain Brewing / Re: Alternative to lactic acid
« on: October 10, 2014, 02:24:18 AM »
Most homebrew supply shops sell 10% phosphoric acid.  You need to use more of it than lactic, but it's incredibly safe.  Phosphoric acid is the main ingredient (along with sugar and water) in cola.

Pages: 1 ... 64 65 [66] 67 68 ... 151