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Messages - natebriscoe

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: Today at 08:04:28 AM »
I don't think there is that one thing to a beer that makes it great. It's the right combination of good things. I.e. without great fermentation, lodo is useless.

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2
I saw that too. I doubt it makes better beer or saves any money or time. But who knows.

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3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: Today at 06:50:21 AM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)
I like this profile as well. Other than the 72 hours, I would be at terminal gravity by then. But 24 works for me.

You may be overpitching then.
What's wrong with a 3 day medium  gravity ale fermentation? I do tend to pitch closer to commercial pitch rates.

For a wheat beer you want to actually pitch near the low end of the range to develop those yeast flavors. And if you are pitching at 58 it should take longer than 3 days to reach terminal gravity on an ale yeast. I brew a Belgian wheat beer regularly (as a commercial brewer pitching at "commercial rates" I should add ;) ) and generally have about 5-6 day fermentations which is exactly what I want.

I personally think a 72 hour fermentation on just about any style of beer except for the very lowest SG beers is simply too fast of a fermentation. You simply want some of that yeast growth to happen to create those pleasant yeast derived flavors. You certainly don't want too much yeast growth or you can get solventy flavors and problems with head retention. But you can also get "yeast bite" problems on beers that are overpitched and fast fermented.

Of course, as with everything brewing, YMMV and your process may work totally fine for you. I'm just speaking from experience (but also from what I have learned over the years).
Sounds like your not a fan of under pitching either? (Seems like everyone wants to under pitch Belgians and English beers)

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: Today at 05:14:25 AM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)
I like this profile as well. Other than the 72 hours, I would be at terminal gravity by then. But 24 works for me.

You may be overpitching then.
What's wrong with a 3 day medium  gravity ale fermentation? I do tend to pitch closer to commercial pitch rates.

For a wheat beer you want to actually pitch near the low end of the range to develop those yeast flavors. And if you are pitching at 58 it should take longer than 3 days to reach terminal gravity on an ale yeast. I brew a Belgian wheat beer regularly (as a commercial brewer pitching at "commercial rates" I should add ;) ) and generally have about 5-6 day fermentations which is exactly what I want.

I personally think a 72 hour fermentation on just about any style of beer except for the very lowest SG beers is simply too fast of a fermentation. You simply want some of that yeast growth to happen to create those pleasant yeast derived flavors. You certainly don't want too much yeast growth or you can get solventy flavors and problems with head retention. But you can also get "yeast bite" problems on beers that are overpitched and fast fermented.

Of course, as with everything brewing, YMMV and your process may work totally fine for you. I'm just speaking from experience (but also from what I have learned over the years).
The commercial guys I know tend to pitch a bit higher than most homebrewer's would. I get clean beers with with a good Ester profile for whatever strain used. Some may take 4 or 5 days, but wlp300 is a beast every time I use it.
But to each there own
Cheers

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:56:01 PM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)
I like this profile as well. Other than the 72 hours, I would be at terminal gravity by then. But 24 works for me.

You may be overpitching then.
What's wrong with a 3 day medium  gravity ale fermentation? I do tend to pitch closer to commercial pitch rates.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:36:13 PM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)
I like this profile as well. Other than the 72 hours, I would be at terminal gravity by then. But 24 works for me.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:29:31 PM »
There is also this thing where the pitch temp and the fermentation temp = 30c that is some type of German wheat rule of thumb.

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8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:10:10 PM »
I think the proper pitch rate is just as important, I not a fan of under pitching anything.

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9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 05:57:00 PM »
That's crazy...I doubt that's what Weihenstephaner does...


I thought the same. I can't claim any knowledge of their practices though. But quite a few brewers (some here, some brewer friends of mine) seem to feel that 3068 is more clove heavy from 62-64F, more banana/bubblegum above 65F.  Maybe a difference in perception. I've never heard of it being used in the 50s, though.
I personally have done them at 58f, tons of banana!

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10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 05:41:12 PM »
62f is supposed to be the magic spot for it (for Balance). When I say cold like 58f. I know a lot of commercial guys run between 56 and 60f.

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That's crazy...I doubt that's what Weihenstephaner does...
Had a local brewery try to convince me that bubblegum was a positive characteristic in their hefe.  ???
Which goes to prove that because you're a professional brewer, doesn't mean you know sh*t.
I will check with a friend of mine next time I see him. He lived and studied in Munich (weihenstephan). 58 to 60f wouldn't surprise me at all.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 05:33:12 PM »
62f is supposed to be the magic spot for it (for Balance). When I say cold like 58f. I know a lot of commercial guys run between 56 and 60f.

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12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 05:24:02 PM »
The beauty of homebrewing is making beer to personal preference. I go for the clove, avoid the banana. Then again I think bananas taste too much like banana.


I'm with you, Pete. I don't make many hefes but when I do, I shoot for the low temp/clove profile. The majority of domestic weissbiers are banana bombs IMO. If I could come close to duplicating a hefe, it would be Schneider Weisse. Each his own.
Fwiw on the weihenstephan strain throws more banana at cold Temps and more bubblegum and phenols warm.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 11:30:23 AM »
Since it is fairly common for traditional hefe's to be open fermented, it would seem that LODO wouldn't be a factor, right?
Lodo is really only about the mashing. Everything after pitching is just good practice on limiting oxidation and maintaining everything done in a lodo mash.

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Disappointed with WLP300
« on: September 26, 2016, 08:23:14 AM »
A ferulic rest will increase the clove not banana. That strain throws more banana at cold temperatures. JZ recommends fermenting at 62, I have at 58 and it's a banana bomb at that temperature. 

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15
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: September 22, 2016, 09:18:26 AM »
Something that occurs to me based on a comment about mash (either LODO or Brewtan) 'smelling better' is that wouldn't the old saw about aroma compounds apply to malt as well as hops?  IOW, if you smell it once, you probably won't smell it again.
I can't speak about the brewtan side, but for the lodo when done right you don't smell the mash.

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