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Messages - natebriscoe

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31
Congrats Michael!!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk


32
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« on: January 07, 2017, 09:41:02 PM »
So, I am missing something on the spreadsheet (well many things), how are we adjusting malt ph's? Is it supposed to calculate off target OG or known %s? Think I am looking at from the wrong angle.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

As for malt pH, you need to remove all pH altering substances, set the malt to 100% of the grain bill and then enter an override value that gives you the distilled water pH of the malt.


So this override is adjusting the L to get to the predicted mash ph? Or is the ph entered somewhere?

You are manually inputting this number to manipulate the estimated pH. It's a hot labor intensive but essentially identical to the way you do it in BW, except that beer color isn't subsequently affected.

The next revision of the spreadsheet that I  am working on is an attempt to divorce the base Malts from the DeLange/Kai color type calcs.
As I increase the L(ph) my predicted mash ph actually goes up.

Right. Increasing the value makes your pH more basic, decreasing more acidic.

Say you have Weyermann Pils with 5.9 pH. You want to increase the malt override. That way you need more acid to get to your desired pH.

You have to remember that BW assumes 5.75 pH as a baseline. Anything above or below that requires some adjustment.
So a ph of 5.9 would need to be adjusted to 8.5? What about a low ph say 5.5? Can't seem adjust it out.

You want to go negative for more acidic pH.

Bryan and I use a custom version of the sheet that was designed for his use in The Beerery. I also have a streamlined version that I call the "BLAM" edition specifically for Trappist beers.

I believe what I'm going to do is revise a stripped down version for general use that keeps all the really good Low Oxygen stuff and integrated water stuff but removes some of the unnecessary bits and makes it easier to use.
How about setting the targeted gravity? It seems to only want to calculate by efficiency.

That's correct. PBG is set by mash η and OG by Brewhouse η.

Blue-ish cells are user inputs. Pinkish cells are calculated. Maroon are dropdowns.
Think I figured it out. Didn't see the grain total input.
Thanks for answering

33
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« on: January 07, 2017, 09:29:19 PM »
So, I am missing something on the spreadsheet (well many things), how are we adjusting malt ph's? Is it supposed to calculate off target OG or known %s? Think I am looking at from the wrong angle.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

As for malt pH, you need to remove all pH altering substances, set the malt to 100% of the grain bill and then enter an override value that gives you the distilled water pH of the malt.


So this override is adjusting the L to get to the predicted mash ph? Or is the ph entered somewhere?

You are manually inputting this number to manipulate the estimated pH. It's a hot labor intensive but essentially identical to the way you do it in BW, except that beer color isn't subsequently affected.

The next revision of the spreadsheet that I  am working on is an attempt to divorce the base Malts from the DeLange/Kai color type calcs.
As I increase the L(ph) my predicted mash ph actually goes up.

Right. Increasing the value makes your pH more basic, decreasing more acidic.

Say you have Weyermann Pils with 5.9 pH. You want to increase the malt override. That way you need more acid to get to your desired pH.

You have to remember that BW assumes 5.75 pH as a baseline. Anything above or below that requires some adjustment.
So a ph of 5.9 would need to be adjusted to 8.5? What about a low ph say 5.5? Can't seem adjust it out.

You want to go negative for more acidic pH.

Bryan and I use a custom version of the sheet that was designed for his use in The Beerery. I also have a streamlined version that I call the "BLAM" edition specifically for Trappist beers.

I believe what I'm going to do is revise a stripped down version for general use that keeps all the really good Low Oxygen stuff and integrated water stuff but removes some of the unnecessary bits and makes it easier to use.
How about setting the targeted gravity? It seems to only want to calculate by efficiency.

34
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« on: January 07, 2017, 09:17:32 PM »
So, I am missing something on the spreadsheet (well many things), how are we adjusting malt ph's? Is it supposed to calculate off target OG or known %s? Think I am looking at from the wrong angle.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

As for malt pH, you need to remove all pH altering substances, set the malt to 100% of the grain bill and then enter an override value that gives you the distilled water pH of the malt.


So this override is adjusting the L to get to the predicted mash ph? Or is the ph entered somewhere?

You are manually inputting this number to manipulate the estimated pH. It's a hot labor intensive but essentially identical to the way you do it in BW, except that beer color isn't subsequently affected.

The next revision of the spreadsheet that I  am working on is an attempt to divorce the base Malts from the DeLange/Kai color type calcs.
As I increase the L(ph) my predicted mash ph actually goes up.

Right. Increasing the value makes your pH more basic, decreasing more acidic.

Say you have Weyermann Pils with 5.9 pH. You want to increase the malt override. That way you need more acid to get to your desired pH.

You have to remember that BW assumes 5.75 pH as a baseline. Anything above or below that requires some adjustment.
So a ph of 5.9 would need to be adjusted to 8.5? What about a low ph say 5.5? Can't seem adjust it out.

35
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« on: January 07, 2017, 08:59:36 PM »
So, I am missing something on the spreadsheet (well many things), how are we adjusting malt ph's? Is it supposed to calculate off target OG or known %s? Think I am looking at from the wrong angle.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

As for malt pH, you need to remove all pH altering substances, set the malt to 100% of the grain bill and then enter an override value that gives you the distilled water pH of the malt.


So this override is adjusting the L to get to the predicted mash ph? Or is the ph entered somewhere?

You are manually inputting this number to manipulate the estimated pH. It's a hot labor intensive but essentially identical to the way you do it in BW, except that beer color isn't subsequently affected.

The next revision of the spreadsheet that I  am working on is an attempt to divorce the base Malts from the DeLange/Kai color type calcs.
As I increase the L(ph) my predicted mash ph actually goes up.

36
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« on: January 07, 2017, 08:45:17 PM »
So, I am missing something on the spreadsheet (well many things), how are we adjusting malt ph's? Is it supposed to calculate off target OG or known %s? Think I am looking at from the wrong angle.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

As for malt pH, you need to remove all pH altering substances, set the malt to 100% of the grain bill and then enter an override value that gives you the distilled water pH of the malt.


So this override is adjusting the L to get to the predicted mash ph? Or is the ph entered somewhere?   

37
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« on: January 07, 2017, 07:19:12 PM »
So, I am missing something on the spreadsheet (well many things), how are we adjusting malt ph's? Is it supposed to calculate off target OG or known %s? Think I am looking at from the wrong angle.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk


38
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 07:16:12 PM »
So I have a question on debugging for the experienced among you (I wasn't really sure which of these Low Oxy threads to stick this in, so I put it here):

I have done 3 batches using the LODO techniques as best as I can implement them with what I have.  The beers were:  semi-English Pale Ale, Best Bitter, Munich Helles.

For all of the beers, I can see what you are getting at with the different malt character.  The helles is the most pronounced of them, in that it was just 100% pilsner malt and it shows.  I'm not sure that the malt character that it evoked worked as nicely in the english beers, but I have much refining of the process to do. 

My question is this:  All three of the beers have this sharp character to them that I perceived as them being either too acidic or as a mineral thing (like if I used too much gypsum, which none of them had).  I posted about this after making the pale ale a couple months ago, relating it to an almost soda like sharpness (orange soda).  All of the beers were made using a mix of RO and tap water which has little in it.  Mineral additions used were CaCl to bring up the calcium and a bit of baking soda to adjust the mash pH (5.2 in all cases).  I have been using a bit lower than the recommended dosing rates for SMB from the tables, coming in around 75ppm.  The finished beer pH is normal for that kind of beer, so that doesn't seem like it should be it.  My guess is that I'm using too much SMB and getting the residual sulfur compounds causing the sharpness in the beer.  Thoughts?

As a side note (I have posted this in other threads too), the best bitter was a sulfur bomb with lots of H2S in it, but the other two don't come off as overly sulfury.
I would say residual smb is the culprit.

39
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 09:03:37 AM »
I was talking to someone that is considering try low o2 mashing the other day. I believe they biab and was talking about slowly lowering the bag and grains into the strike water instead of under letting. Thoughts?

40
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 08:38:31 AM »
Transfer to keg when at about 4 points from final gravity

What would be the best practice for ales and people who don't have the equipment to spund?
I keep a close eye on fermentation, when I see the bubbles start to slow it's probably getting close to being time to transfer. For lagers it's about 7 or 8 days, for ales it's more like 4 or 5 days (for me). I don't have a spunding valve either, just close it up, seal like normal and let sit for another week before putting in the kegerator.
I have had good luck catching it right at fg and priming the keg and keg conditioning. Keeps a bit more yeast out of the keg.

For sure that will work, I noticed however a flavor hit when doing it (I currently have like 3 on tap like this), and when comparing them side by side to their counterparts, there is a small cidery flavor present. I don't mean this to stop anyone either, just a heads up.
I will agree that spunding is the best option. But for the person not ready to jump into that, keg priming is a good option. Have not noticed a cider flavor in mine, but most have been big flavored ales.

41
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 08:24:56 AM »
Transfer to keg when at about 4 points from final gravity

What would be the best practice for ales and people who don't have the equipment to spund?
I keep a close eye on fermentation, when I see the bubbles start to slow it's probably getting close to being time to transfer. For lagers it's about 7 or 8 days, for ales it's more like 4 or 5 days (for me). I don't have a spunding valve either, just close it up, seal like normal and let sit for another week before putting in the kegerator.
I have had good luck catching it right at fg and priming the keg and keg conditioning. Keeps a bit more yeast out of the keg.

42
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 21, 2016, 08:12:47 AM »
Low o2 mashing improves every beer that uses malt, hands down.  Doesn't matter if it's lager, ale, hoppy or malty. Some styles show it more than others, but all are improved.

43
All Grain Brewing / Re: LODO Impact on Roast Flavor
« on: December 12, 2016, 08:44:35 AM »
So finally made time to brew up a  low o2 stout. My initial tasting after the mash and post boil was a very smooth roast and a pretty pronounced coffee flavor. This was 1.5lb roast malt (50/50 chocolate/ black barley) in a 5 gallon batch. Will have to wait and see how it finishes, but at this point I might even consider using a bit more roast malt.



What mash pH did you use, out of curiosity?
Ended up at 5.4. Was shooting for closer to 5.5, But I will take it.

44
All Grain Brewing / Re: LODO Impact on Roast Flavor
« on: December 12, 2016, 08:30:54 AM »
So finally made time to brew up a  low o2 stout. My initial tasting after the mash and post boil was a very smooth roast and a pretty pronounced coffee flavor. This was 1.5lb roast malt (50/50 chocolate/ black barley) in a 5 gallon batch. Will have to wait and see how it finishes, but at this point I might even consider using a bit more roast malt.

45
Equipment and Software / Re: BCS Support and the future of the controller
« on: December 01, 2016, 04:43:31 PM »
Glad to here there is still support! I have 2 and really like them. Would be a shame for the bcs to go obsolete.

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