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Messages - denny

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: More pedestrian questions
« on: July 25, 2016, 12:04:30 PM »
When I saw that the Duvel recipe included pear extract, I gave up.
Yeah, just lame. If you ferment it right you get that from the yeast.   :)

FYI --- WLP400 witbier yeast throws a lot of pear ester.  I'll bet it would be wonderful in a Duvel clone.

IMO too phenolic.  Duvel is vert clean other than the slightest bit of fruit.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: More pedestrian questions
« on: July 25, 2016, 10:58:16 AM »
I have done multistep mashing for the majority of my AG batches and have not noticed any adverse effects from the grains.  Why would a rest at 120F damage the malts? dmtaylor, dennyC, Hoosierbrew?  Randys book, Mastering Homebrew, talks about theses rests in detail. Why they are necessary, even with todays malts.  If only I could put my thumb on the page & paragraph...

A 120 rest with highly modified malt can ruin the body and foam of a beer.  Plus, as far as I can tell, you're not actually improving anything.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: More pedestrian questions
« on: July 25, 2016, 09:55:03 AM »
IMO, Clone Brews is about the worst homebrew book ever written.


Yeah, it's bad. I brewed a couple of those recipes to the T, and then tossed the book.

When I saw that the Duvel recipe included pear extract, I gave up.

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: More pedestrian questions
« on: July 25, 2016, 09:40:24 AM »
   Clone Brews has a number of recipes which call for protein rests, I was thinking that Classic Styles also had some but after re-checking theirs are all single step infusion mashes, the rest of the books which include protein rests are early to mid 90's or older. There are a number of recipes on the AHA website which includes rests in the protein temperature range? The ones I found are all decoction mashes, but I would think a protein rest is a protein rest, regardless of mashing style.
   How long has it been since under modified malts were available on the homebrew market?

IMO, Clone Brews is about the worst homebrew book ever written.  It's been 12 years or more since you didn't have to go out of your way to find malts that required a protein rest.  As the commercial beer market got bigger and bigger, commercial brewers didn't want to mess with it, so the malts became more highly modified.

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: No fermentation after 24 hours.
« on: July 25, 2016, 08:47:58 AM »
Relax.  Rehydrate or don't. It makes little difference with dry yeast.

Buckets are notorious for bad seals that allow gas out so you don't see air lock activity.  But this is not something to worry about.  Buckets are just fine for fermenting.

ALL OF THIS^^^^...plus, 24 hours is WAY too soon to be worrying!

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Medal displays
« on: July 25, 2016, 08:40:16 AM »
I just hang 'em on nails in the brewery.

37 lb.!

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: More pedestrian questions
« on: July 22, 2016, 10:39:32 AM »
   Kind of what I suspected. Why do so many recipes in well known books that I'm assuming were written after the current malts replaced the old under modified ones, still include protein rests in so many recipes? Perhaps that's a rhetorical question.
   And yes the stout is not only drinkable, but is better than some of the stuff I've paid money for. I wish I had a few more bottles to share with others.

What books are you referring to?

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewing as you age
« on: July 22, 2016, 10:37:24 AM »
A pump makes a huge difference for me.  I tried BIAB and didn't find it any faster or easier than what I normally do.

9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Experience with Saflager 34/70?
« on: July 21, 2016, 10:33:38 AM »
Now today I just read on Brulosophy.com that people can't taste the difference between WLP833 and W-34/70.


I guess I need to do a side by side - 833 definitely seems to leave a maltier mouthfeel than 2124 to me. Sort of like the difference between 1056 and 1450. Who knows? I can always be wrong.

I think we all (including me) fall victim to confirmation bias very easily.  We are told that one yeast is crisper or maltier, and we believe it and actually taste the beer that way.  But until there's a blind triangle, we may very well be fooling ourselves.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Experience with Saflager 34/70?
« on: July 21, 2016, 09:03:54 AM »
A friend of mine swears WLP833 is the secret to the finest lagers and I totally believe him, as they're great.

Now today I just read on Brulosophy.com that people can't taste the difference between WLP833 and W-34/70.  So there's that.

There's a lot less variation between lager yeasts than there is in ale yeast.  Doesn't really surprise me that people have a hard time telling them apart.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Experimental Brewing Episode 19
« on: July 20, 2016, 08:49:00 AM »
This episode starts with a brief stop at the brewery where we walk you through some of the newest things we're playing with! (Like Drew's new mill - review on the site)

Then we ask - What happens when you get a whole bunch of brewers together and have them open up their breweries? Well, if they belong to the Falcons then it becomes their annual event "Brew with a Falcon". Denny tests out our spiffy phone interface and calls five brewers in the Los Angeles area as they're brewing. At least one of them will be familiar to you! See what sort of crazy beer is being made!

Then it's time for our last turn around the block in Charm City as we present our HomeBrewCon presentation - "How To Brew Like An All-Star". The audio is courtesy of the American Homebrewer's Association. Did you know that all members of the AHA get free access to audio recordings and slide decks from all of the Con's presentations? To join the AHA just click on the AHA logo on our homepage! Support the podcast and the group that fights for your rights as a homebrewer!

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/sites/default/files/ExperimentalBrewing_Episode_019_Brew_Like_An_AllStar.mp3

OR find us on YouTube!  https://youtu.be/UQnHdAK94F0

12
Beer Recipes / Re: altbier feedback
« on: July 19, 2016, 02:32:58 PM »
Depends on what you want...Munich malt seems to not be used very often in German alts, although I really like it in my version.  I do a 60 min. mash at 150.  Never bothered to check pH because between my water and the dark Munich they always turn out great.  But I think your pH target looks good.  I'd advise you to skip the caramunich.  Also, I prefer Sinamar to using dark malts...easier to dial in the color.  If you want to go more German, look for the Zum Uerige recipe here in the forum.  Here's my American take on an alt, which has won me a lot of awards....http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/MilosAlt

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: mashing at 148F
« on: July 19, 2016, 09:19:14 AM »
Yup. At 148F I always go for 90 minutes but I'm sure you'll hear from a few people that even at that low of a temp that basically all the enzymatic activity is done in 45 min and you won't know the difference. I don't doubt them but I'm typically not in a rush on brew days anyway so I don't chance it - and it doesn't hurt anything to go longer.

See, the thing is that not ALL the enzymatic activity is done that soon.  Even if a lot of it is, it still goes on as long as the temp is in range.

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: mashing at 148F
« on: July 19, 2016, 09:01:05 AM »
There may be differing opinions, but when I mash sub 150F I go for 90 minutes. Enzymatic conversion allegedly takes longer sub 150F, but I don't have any scientific data on how much slower, just anecdotal observations. Regardless, for a saison where you want super high attenuation, a 146-148F/90 min mash makes a nice dry beer.

Same here...just to be sure.  Plus it I'm mashing at 148 it's becasue I want a highly attenuative wort, so an extra 30 min. doesn't hurt.

15
Equipment and Software / Re: Favorite type of wort chiller ?
« on: July 19, 2016, 08:59:56 AM »
I recently started using a Hydra chiller from JaDeD.  With my 56F water, it took 5.5  gal. from boiling to 58F in 8 minutes.  It's pretty much as fast as a plate or counter flow with a fraction of the hassles.

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