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Messages - denny

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1
Hi all, let's say I am using a recipe posted online, but I need to add 4-5 lbs of base malt to make up for my lower efficiency. Do I need to increase the specialty grains by the same pro-rated amount to keep the grain %'s the same, or is this irrelevant?

For example: an imperial stout

20lbs maris otter
2lbs chocolate malt
1lb crystal 60
1.5lbs roasted barley

But I need approx 26lbs maris otter to achieve the same OG. Do I increase the chocolate malt/c60 and roasted barley by the same amount or keep as is? I always wondered this. Thanks!

This is a topic of some debate.  I'll tell you that I increase all the grain to keep the relative % the same.  But not everyone does.

2
Going Pro / Re: Switching careers to brew?
« on: Today at 09:46:09 AM »
Is it realistic to be their brewer AND work full time at my regular job?

Resoundingly no.

THIS^^^

3
https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/brew-files-episode-25-double-juice-mike

The Brew is Out There!

RECIPE SHOW

Drew sits down with Michael Tonsmeire, aka the Mad Fermentationist, and walks through how you can get two juicy beers of radically different natures from one brew session. So sit back as we explore his Apricot infused Sour and super juicy New England IPA.

4
Submitted

5
Beer Recipes / Re: Rye IPA recipe
« on: December 12, 2017, 10:31:43 AM »
I'm not a big fan of Rye and Munich together.   To my tastes they clash.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: American light lager
« on: December 11, 2017, 02:16:30 PM »
Okay,  I'm NOT the expert,  but whether or not the longer process makes a difference,  I can see that lacking constant air flow, temperatures could spike and more CO2 could be trapped in the piece.  That sounds to me just like what's done towards the end of germination to produce Brumalt/ honey malt/melanoidin malt (does it go by any other names?)  Makes you think, since floor malts are supposed to have a richer flavor.   Again, not an expert.

Are you sure they lack constant air flow?  The one floor malting operation I've visited indicated that it was constant.  I'll try to double check on that.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: American light lager
« on: December 11, 2017, 02:14:59 PM »
Floor malting is a marketing term.  Sure, the barley is malted traditionally on the floor and turned/shoveled by hand after each steep but that's it.

There is no other difference.  Modification is the same unless purposefully cut short.

Now if it said "Wood fire kilned" as opposed to an electronically controlled kiln profile then yes there would probably be a noticeable difference.

I haven't tested it but a triangle test would most certainly indicate that there is no discernable difference.  Maybe someone (Brulosophy, Experimental Brewing, etc...) can do an experiment on this.

Trying malting your own sometime and you'll see what I mean.

As far as adjuncts are concerned, I don't believe they're required to make a light lager, one can use all malt, proper mash temps and perhaps amylase enzyme.

Well, I've used quite a bit of Mecca Grade malts and they're mechanically floor malted  I doubt any maltster of any size uses human labor to turn them, but I could be wrong.  In the case of Mecca Grade I believe that more difference in flavor comes form the barley variety they use than the way they malt it.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: American light lager
« on: December 11, 2017, 01:36:18 PM »
Oh, I'm not 100% certain, but highly suspicious!  I'd be very interested in trying some heirloom malts to see if they are really different.  Of course floor malting would have an impact too.

Now you've done it...brought up something else I have questions about!  What is the difference floor malting makes and why?

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: American light lager
« on: December 11, 2017, 01:18:27 PM »
Since I think modern six-row bears little resemblance to the old stuff

I'm curious about how you reached this conclusion.

I think a big hint is right in the Wahl-Henius Handybook, the analyses showing American six-rows with protein levels in the 9%-11% range.  That shows they must have differed from the end product of a century of breeding.  And I'd be shocked if protein was all that had changed.  Flavor hasn't been top priority for breeders, agronomic qualities have.  So as long as I'm not doing an archaeology project, I just use the best malt I can.  I know there ARE micro-maltsters using heirloom barley, but I haven't had access.

Thanks for the explanation.  I don't deny that there very well could be flavor differences, but I guess I'm not as certain about it as you are.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: American light lager
« on: December 11, 2017, 12:19:01 PM »
Since I think modern six-row bears little resemblance to the old stuff

I'm curious about how you reached this conclusion.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Silly bitterness in Grapefruit IPA
« on: December 11, 2017, 09:28:16 AM »
It's only been fermenting 6 days, don't dump it.  Beers taste totally different when they're warm, straight from the fermenter and uncarbonated (not to mention potentially still fermenting) than they will cold and fermented.

THIS^^^^

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Does grain absorption depend on crush?
« on: December 10, 2017, 02:09:23 PM »
I haven't noticed much difference across crushes.

Same here

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Down sides of no mashout?
« on: December 10, 2017, 11:05:46 AM »
You mean, one last burst off alpha activity before it's denatured?

Yep, that's what it looks like to me.

14
Ingredients / Re: Gold Rush Toasted Pale Malt
« on: December 10, 2017, 11:04:54 AM »
Between them and Mecca Grade, I'm developing a real fondness for Full Pint barley.

Denny, would you consider GR fundamentally different from other full pint base malts? Do you recall if it was in the 1-2º L or 3-4º L range?

The first "full pint" I got was from Great Western and I was not a fan (and I love GW's pale and "pale ale" 2-row). I tried Mecca Grade and liked it all right, but found it overpriced at nearly double the price of imported base malt and triple the price of domestic. I haven't tried Gold Rush yet, but wondered if it was more akin to a British base malt or a domestic 2-row. I can't seem to find a malt analysis anywhere and the website is pretty barren. The name they use at Steinbart's ("toasted pale") implies that it is somehow differently-processed.

If you don't care for Full Pint you probably won't care for GR.  It's different than MG, but not a world of difference.  Still has the Full Pint flavor.

15
All Grain Brewing / Re: Down sides of no mashout?
« on: December 10, 2017, 10:17:09 AM »
Thanks for that info, Denny.  But something is affecting yield, and I'm curious what it is. Maybe Martin could elaborate? He addressed this.  As to Jeff's observation on foam:  I guess even if your alpha rest is on the low side, if you mash off you at least pass through the 162°-163°F range and gain some benefit in glycoprotein development.

What I found by checking conversion efficiency is that the hotter temp is increasing conversion slightly.  So it's more that additonal sugar is being created more than you're drawing more out of the mash.

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