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Messages - denny

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Best way to store empty kegs?
« on: June 27, 2016, 08:52:55 AM »
You cou;d just clean them and then store them. No need at all to store them with sani in them, or water. If you want to be particularly anal clean, sani and purge them with co2.

That's what I do.  I clean them and once they're dry I put enough CO2 on them to seal them.  I sanitize right before I use them.  If they aren't pressurized when I go to use them, I know I have a leaky keg.

2
I have a 3 gal. water heater under the sink.  It's not instant, but due to the small size it recovers quickly.  That's great for small cleaning jobs, but not big enough for larger stuff.  My solution to that was to start using Craftmeister Alkaline Brewery Wash.  It's more effective in cold water than PBW is in hot water, so I can now clean my large stuff with cold water and not have to worry about the water heater capacity.

3
The Pub / Re: Oregon
« on: June 26, 2016, 09:06:06 AM »
Why do you think I live here?  ;)

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all grain brew day
« on: June 25, 2016, 12:06:22 PM »
Good on ya!

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all grain brew day
« on: June 25, 2016, 10:44:44 AM »

I got the grain on Wednesday, and left in the bag sealed up tight in a bucket.

Thank you for the tip, maybe I'll buy the night before next time!

Doesn't hurt, but isn't necessary.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all grain brew day
« on: June 25, 2016, 10:43:52 AM »
Heck of a job getting it all done before Lunch time.  My buddy and I can't manage to get it done that quickly and it sounds like you went at it alone!  (we also have to wait for the grain store to open so they're milled fresh the morning of).

Keep up the good work, take meticulous notes and perfect the process :)

How are you fermenting?
 
Tightly sealed paper bag stored in a cool, dry closet if it's only a few days.  If it's longer, I put that in a plastic trash bag, still stored in a cool dry closet.  I once had a heart attack after I had grain crushed for a German pils and dind't get to it for 5 months.  It was still fine.


FWIW, I often crush grain several days, or even a week or more, in advance and it doesn't seem to make any difference if stored properly.

How do you store?  Air tight bag? Refrigerate?

7
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Doctoring an insipid cream ale
« on: June 25, 2016, 09:34:57 AM »
*slaps forehead* That's so obvious and yet, my brain never went there. Thanks Denny.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

You were trying hard to make it more difficult, so I went pragmatic....;)

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all grain brew day
« on: June 25, 2016, 09:33:38 AM »
Heck of a job getting it all done before Lunch time.  My buddy and I can't manage to get it done that quickly and it sounds like you went at it alone!  (we also have to wait for the grain store to open so they're milled fresh the morning of).

Keep up the good work, take meticulous notes and perfect the process :)

How are you fermenting?

FWIW, I often crush grain several days, or even a week or more, in advance and it doesn't seem to make any difference if stored properly.

9
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Doctoring an insipid cream ale
« on: June 25, 2016, 09:07:43 AM »
How about dry hopping it?

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 24, 2016, 01:40:51 PM »
I thought the use of O2 indicates respiration as opposed to fermentation, with no ethanol production during that time, due to the different pathway.

If I am wrong, I apologize.

The O2 is to synthesize sterols to keep cell walls flexible for budding.  And the Crabtree Effect states that in the presence of a >.05% glucose solution, like wort, fermentation begins immediately.  As Narvin pointed out, there are no distinct phases.  It all happens at once.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 24, 2016, 10:51:34 AM »
I thought the crabtree effect meant that all growth in regular gravity wort was due to fermentation, and O2 was just used for building ergosterol and other during the process.  AKA there are no actual phases in fermentation unless you're propagating yeast at a very low gravity (< 1.010).

AFAIK, you are correct.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Sankey D Kegs
« on: June 24, 2016, 10:50:40 AM »
You're really not going to want to start with sankey kegs.  You'll at least have to build a keg cleaner, since taking the spear out every time is a PITA.  Get some corneys.

THIS^^^^^

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 23, 2016, 11:56:46 AM »
The thing is, you never really know when the yeast are done with their growth phase. I think you'd run a much bigger chance of oxidation by continuous aeration rather than a one-time shot of oxygen. For a big beer, I'd rather hit it with a 2nd dose of oxygen about 18-30 hours after pitching. I've had good results up to 1.142 O.G. with this.

Totally agreed

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 23, 2016, 11:26:39 AM »
If you wanted to make a beer that required daily oxygenation (i.e. with Ringwood) this could help.

With a Peter Austin system, they not only perform open fermentations with Ringwood but also rouse and aerate daily.

Or it could also be useful in a super high gravity beer.  But I agree that "regular" beers don't need it.

You need to define "super high gravity".  I've made beers up to around 1.120 using "normal" techniques and they turned out fine.  I can't see any advantage to this over occasional rousing.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stirring the fermenter
« on: June 23, 2016, 09:19:29 AM »
I bought this stir plate

http://www.northernbrewer.com/maelstrom-stir-plate

In the video it has a 5gal fermenter filled with water and it creates a very nice vortex.

My question, would using it in the first 2-3 days after pitching increase the rate of fermentation? would there be any bad/good side effects?

I really doubt it would increase the rate of fermentation.  The yeast at that point is very active and pretty much keeps itself in suspension.  A possible drawback could be oxidizing your beer. 

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