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Messages - denny

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16
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydra wort chillers
« on: October 18, 2018, 03:48:19 PM »
At one point, just for a moment, I found myself considering what it would take to plumb in a full pressure garden spigot under the kitchen sink to run a Hydra off of.  Then I realized this might be a sign of an unhealthy obsession.    8)

Hey, that's minor compared to what some people do.  It's nearly sane!

17
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydra wort chillers
« on: October 17, 2018, 09:36:18 PM »
^^^^
No, I'm old school, 10 gal stockpot on the stove.   IC in, stir with a spoon, agitate the pre chiller in the ice bath,  and I take 6.5-7 gal from boiling to the 60s in ~18 minutes.   Looks like with my flow rate I can't beat that right now.   The Hydra looks like it's better suited to the brewer who's outdoors with a garden hose,  not to mention a bigger batch than me.  By no means do I suggest there's anything fundamentally wrong with the Hydra.

Yeah, I got that.  I was just curious.

18
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydra wort chillers
« on: October 17, 2018, 08:36:12 PM »
I did some research including online reviews,  a search of the forum and stuff posted by JaDeD (or however they type that out.)  It seems that the 6gpm flow rate is integral to getting the stated performance,  and I can only provide more like ~1gpm or a bit more.  At that rate, it appears  that instead of 3 minutes to reach groundwater +10F, it will take 15-20 minutes.  They recommended against using a pre chiller as it will further restrict the flow.   Rather they suggest,  if groundwater is not cool enough, stopping at G+10F,  hooking up a pump, and finishing by running (not recirculating) ice water.  So without 6gpm,  it's 15-20 minutes, then break down, reset, and pump for who knows how long.

My IC is 50ft of 3/8in configured in a very loose double coil to maximize contact and flow of stirred wort over the surface area.   My pre chiller is 25ft of 1/2in in an ice bath, used only when groundwater temperature requires.   My chilling time for 6.5-7 gal wort is never over 18 minutes, with my available ~1gpm flow.

So for now, it looks like I'm better off sticking with what I have.   If I could provide the 6gpm, I'd surely try the Hydra, as I know I couldn't push that through my current system.  3 minutes + switching to pumping ice water might still beat my current time.

Hope this info helps anyone else with similar questions to mine.

Do you use the whirlpool arm?

19
This was a great listen, Denny. Nice certainly loves yeast and other microbes. I think out here in the Rockies, Inland Island is our closest similar yeast provider, but they still focus on somewhat more traditional strains so the "yeast boutique" has some room to grow out here. I will definitely recommend Yeast Bay to my brother out on the coast.

Thanks!

20
https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/brew-files-episode-47-bays-portland

The Brew is Out There! 

One of our favorite yeast people is back and he's got big news! Nick Impelitteri is going full time and moving to Beervana - aka Portland - aka the new "Bay" City? In addition we talk about new toys he's bringing to bear including a nectar loving critter that might change how you experience hops.

21
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydra wort chillers
« on: October 17, 2018, 03:52:53 PM »
Is it equally advantageous at a lower flow rate?  I run my IC (with prechiller) off the kitchen faucet,  so it's a significantly lower rate than I believe is quoted to get the super speed advertised (full line pressure off a garden hose I believe.)

I haven't tried it, so I don't know.  The guys at Hydra are very responsive and knowledgeable, so I suggest you contact them.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydra wort chillers
« on: October 17, 2018, 02:43:44 PM »
The $150 price tag has me stuck though. At that point I could get into a counterflow chiller. I don't have one thought, just an IC, so I'm guessing the hydra is easier to clean and you only have one fluid to circulate though.

The Hydra is at least as fast as a counterflow and easier to maintain.  No contest.

23
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Six New Beer Styles of 2018
« on: October 16, 2018, 09:44:13 PM »
> Should NEIPA/NEPA be in 21 or 18? Based on bitterness, it would fit more in line with an American Pale Ale.

IMO neither. I find the majority of NE / hazy "IPAs" to be nowhere near bitter enough to label as IPA, and they're typically less bitter than an APA too. To me they represent an entirely new (albeit derivative) style creation of modern American craft brewers, and should be named as such.

The originators of the style, most notably Heady Topper, are far more bitter than what typifies the style today.

THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU!

24
The Pub / Re: The future has never seemed more bleak
« on: October 16, 2018, 07:35:20 PM »
All I’m going to say is this:  threads like this cause my tongue to bleed.  The proximal cause is biting it.  The distal is not wanting to get banned for making people mad over politics.

Thank you.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pump or Gravity Stand?
« on: October 15, 2018, 10:47:05 PM »
I have everything on one level and, similarly to RC, use a pitcher for transfers.  LT drains by gravity to a pitcher or pail as a "grant" and I only lift a bit at a time to the kettle.  I've always done it like this, but appreciate it more as I need to lift less.  Ain't fancy, but it also avoids the PITA factors mentioned.   Unfortunately, there is no pump available to alleviate the need to lift sacks of grain, kegs in and out of the keezer... Maybe Denny will have some workarounds for these kinds of operations, too.   :)

I recommend anti gravity devices.  Like young friends! 

But somewhat seriously, I use CO2 xfers to get beer into keezers, assuming the spacing works for you.  I also split kegs and grain into 2 containers so they're easier to lift.

26
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pump or Gravity Stand?
« on: October 15, 2018, 07:36:51 PM »
I've been using a pump for years and find it very useful.  But I do not do recirculation.  My trials haven't found any value to me from it.  But I'm building a no lift system and I find pumps so useful that I just sprung for a Blichmann Riptide.

27
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 06:34:49 PM »



But higher temps would encourage fermentation, not hinder it.  Unless your fermentation got to over 115F.
Well, some yeasts are sensitive to temperatures lower than 115°, some will crap out at 90°, but ambient the 70s is just going to get you to fermentation temperatures that give off flavors,  not dead yeast.  The point is spot on that you should have seen accelerated a activity.  I don't think it's a yeast issue here.  But temperature control is still one of the most valuable additions you can make to your brewery.  Should come before all the other bells and whistles.

Hey, Rob, for my own edification what yeasts crap out at 90F?
I think pretty much any lager yeast will stop at 90° but I'm being a bit pedantic there I guess.  Nobody's likely to be in that situation, except maybe in propagation.  Which would then stop being propagation.   I don't know if any ale strains would shut down before they're dead.  But not many will make beer you want to drink under those conditions. Sorry to distract.

(One old test to differentiate ale and lager yeast was to incubate them at 90°, and if they didn't die, they were ale yeast!)

OK, now I'm gonna be guilty of diversion...I'm not aware of any lager strain that will shut down at 90F.  But that's exact;y what I mean...I'm not aware.  I'll see if I can get any info from my friends at Wyeast.  I'll also see Chris White in Australia in a couple weeks and I'll try to remember to ask him.

28
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 05:32:02 PM »
You must have mashed too hot and killed off the beta amylase quickly.  That would explain the low attenuation better than anything else.

Yeah,  that would do it, but he fairly good verification on both strike water and mash temp.  Although if his thermometer was massively off, it could be.  Kinda seems like a long shot, though.

29
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 05:30:24 PM »



But higher temps would encourage fermentation, not hinder it.  Unless your fermentation got to over 115F.
Well, some yeasts are sensitive to temperatures lower than 115°, some will crap out at 90°, but ambient the 70s is just going to get you to fermentation temperatures that give off flavors,  not dead yeast.  The point is spot on that you should have seen accelerated a activity.  I don't think it's a yeast issue here.  But temperature control is still one of the most valuable additions you can make to your brewery.  Should come before all the other bells and whistles.

Hey, Rob, for my own edification what yeasts crap out at 90F?

30
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 04:56:46 PM »

But temperature control is still one of the most valuable additions you can make to your brewery.  Should come before all the other bells and whistles.

Absolutely, but we're straying from the original question...as usually happens!  I just don't want it to get lost in our rambling.

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